Friday 24 July 2015

My Books

A Brief History of the Smile
Comments: print

liii, 226 p. : ill. ; 21 cm.

Angus Trumble.

Includes bibliographical references (p. 197-216) and index.

Abstract:
A Companion to English Renaissance Literature and Culture
Comments: print

xix, 747 p. ; 26 cm.

edited by Michael Hattaway.

Includes bibliographical references and index.

Abstract:
A Culture of Teaching
Comments: print

xiii, 210 p. : ill. ; 24 cm.

Rebecca W. Bushnell.

Includes bibliographical references and index.

Abstract:
A Farewell to Alms
Comments: print

xii, 420 p. : ill., maps ; 24 cm.

Gregory Clark.

Includes bibliographical references (p. 383-407) and index.

Abstract:
A General View of the Rural Economy of England, 1538-1840
Comments: In rural England prior to the Industrial Revolution people generally married when they were not busy with work. Parish registers of marriage therefore form an important and innovative source for the study of economic change in this period. Dr Kussmaul employs marriage dates to identify three main patterns of work and risk (arable, pastoral and rural industrial) and more importantly to show the long-term changes in economic activities across 542 English parishes from the beginning of national marriage registration in 1538. No single historical landscape emerges. Instead A General View of the Rural Economy of England, 1538-1840 maps the changes in economic orientation from arable through regional specialization to rural industrialization and explores how these changes had implications for the extent of population growth in the early modern period. Dr Kussmaul's study presents a view of early modern English economic history from a unique standpoint.
Abstract:
A Historian's Guide to Computing
Comments: As computers become ever more essential in study in research, scholars and students need clear advice on how best to use them. A Historians' Guide to Computing is the one place to find that advice. Designed especially for computer non-literate readers, this handy guide covers all you need to know about computers and research: databases and information management, numbers and measurement, statistics, graphical and tabular display, document preparation, and textual analysis. From e-mail to on-line catalogs, Greenstein uses real-life examples to show how to avoid pitfalls and solve problems. Not tied to any specific software, the Guide will help users harness computers efficiently, productively, and cost-effectively for projects of any size or complexity.
Abstract:
A History of Economics
Comments: print

ix, 324 p. ; 24 cm.

John Kenneth Galbraith.

Includes bibliographical references and index.

Abstract:
A History of Everyday Things
Comments: print

ix, 309 p. ; 24 cm.

Daniel Roche ; translated by Brian Pearce.

Translation of: Histoire des choses banales.

Includes bibliographical references (p. 256-304) and index.

Abstract:
A History of Gold and Money, 1450 to 1920
Comments: print

360 p. : ill., maps ; 22 cm.

Pierre Vilar ; translated by Judith White.

Translation of: Oro y moneda en la historia.

Includes bibliographical references and indexes.

Abstract:
A History of Women in the West: From Ancient Goddesses to Christian Saints
Comments: In the words of the general editors, A History of Women seeks "to understand women's place in society, their condition, the roles they played and the powers they possessed, their silence, their speech, and their deeds. It is the variety of the representations of women--as gods, Madonnas, witches, and so on--that we hope to capture, in its permanence as well as its many transformations." Informed by the work of seventy-five distinguished historians, this five-volume series sets before us an engaging, panoramic chronicle that extends from antiquity to the present day. The inaugural volume brings women from the margins of ancient history into the fore. The authors' deft analysis offers fresh insight into more than twenty centuries of Greek and Roman history and encompasses a landscape that stretches from the North Sea to the Mediterranean and from the Pillars of Hercules to the banks of the Indus. In the minds of the ancients, the roles for which women were destined were silent ones: motherhood and homemaking, tasks relegated to obscurity by scribes who focused exclusively on the deeds of men. Even the census neglected women; in Rome, only heiresses were counted. But the dearth of information about women in official archives and the near absence of writing by women from this era stand in stark contrast to the astonishing profusion of texts and images created by men that are concerned with women and gender. The number of women's representations is astonishing. The authors draw upon sources ranging from gravestones to floor plans, from stele inscriptions to papyrus rolls, from vase paintings to Greek and Roman literary works, to illustrate how representations of women evolved during thisage. They journey into the minds of men--from the Greeks imagining their goddesses to the Church Fathers inventing the figure of the martyred female saint--and bring to light an imaginative history of women and of the relations between the sexes. The authors explore select aspects o
Abstract:
A History of Women in the West: Renaissance and Enlightenment Paradoxes
Comments: In the words of the general editors, A History of Women seeks "to understand women's place in society, their condition, the roles they played and the powers they possessed, their silence, their speech, and their deeds. It is the variety of the representations of women--as gods, Madonnas, witches, and so on--that we hope to capture, in its permanence as well as its many transformations." Informed by the work of seventy-five distinguished historians, this five-volume series sets before us an engaging, panoramic chronicle that extends from antiquity to the present day. The inaugural volume brings women from the margins of ancient history into the fore. The authors' deft analysis offers fresh insight into more than twenty centuries of Greek and Roman history and encompasses a landscape that stretches from the North Sea to the Mediterranean and from the Pillars of Hercules to the banks of the Indus. In the minds of the ancients, the roles for which women were destined were silent ones: motherhood and homemaking, tasks relegated to obscurity by scribes who focused exclusively on the deeds of men. Even the census neglected women; in Rome, only heiresses were counted. But the dearth of information about women in official archives and the near absence of writing by women from this era stand in stark contrast to the astonishing profusion of texts and images created by men that are concerned with women and gender. The number of women's representations is astonishing. The authors draw upon sources ranging from gravestones to floor plans, from stele inscriptions to papyrus rolls, from vase paintings to Greek and Roman literary works, to illustrate how representations of women evolved during thisage. They journey into the minds of men--from the Greeks imagining their goddesses to the Church Fathers inventing the figure of the martyred female saint--and bring to light an imaginative history of women and of the relations between the sexes. The authors explore select aspects o
Abstract:
A History of Young People in the West
Comments: print

2 v. : ill. ; 25 cm.

edited by Giovanni Levi and Jean-Claude Schmitt ; translated by Camille Naish.

Includes bibliographical references and indexes.

Abstract:
A History of Young People in the West: Stormy Evolution to Modern Times
Comments:

However swiftly it passes, youth is always with us, a perpetual passing phase, an apprenticeship to the myriad ways of the world, subject of panegyrics and diatribes, romances and cautionary tales from antiquity to our day. This two-volume history is the first to present a comprehensive account of what youth has been in the West and what it has meant through the ages. Brought together by Giovanni Levi and Jean-Claude Schmitt, a company of gifted historians and social scientists traces the changing character and status of young people from the gymnasia of ancient Greece to the lycées of modern France, from the sweatshops of the industrial revolution to the crucibles of Nazi youth.

Monumental in its scope, minute in its attention to detail, A History of Young People takes us into the sensational rituals surrounding youth in Roman antiquity (such as the Lupercalia, with its nudity and whipping) and into the chivalric trials awaiting the privileged young of the Middle Ages. Elisabeth Crouzet-Pavan and Michel Pastoureau explore the elusive question of what defines youth, a concept that over time has reached from infancy to the age of forty. Elliott Horowitz and Renata Ago consider the young in the context of the family--within the different worlds of European Judaism and Catholicism through the Renaissance. Sabina Loriga takes us through three centuries of military experience to temper and complicate our assumptions about the youthful face of war. Michelle Perrot focuses on working-class youth, and Jean-Claude Caron on the young at school. The obedient and the rebellious are here, the cherished and the sacrificed, the children catapulted into adult responsibility, the adults who have yet to forsake the protections of childhood. What emerges in this history as never before is a vast, richly textured picture of youth as a changing constant of culture, society, economics, politics, and art, and as a uniquely complex experience of acculturation in every life.

Abstract:
A History of Youth
Comments:
Abstract:
A House in Gross Disorder
Comments: xvi, 216 p., [8] p. of plates : ill., geneal. tables ; 22 cm.

Includes bibliographical references (p. [195]-211) and index.
Abstract:
A Millennium of Family Change
Comments: print

vii, 343 p. ; 24 cm.

Wally Seccombe.

Includes bibliographical references (p. 307-331) and index.

Abstract:
A New Historical Geography of England
Comments: xiv, 767 p. illus. 24 cm.

Includes bibliographical references.
Abstract:
A Phenomenology of Working-Class Experience
Comments: This moving and challenging 1999 book by Simon Charlesworth deals with the personal consequences of poverty and class and the effects of growing up as part of a poor and stigmatized group. Charlesworth examines these themes by focussing on a particular town - Rotherham - in South Yorkshire, England, and using the personal testimony of disadvantaged people who live there, acquired through recorded interviews and conversations. He applies to these life stories the interpretative tools of philosophy and social theory, drawing in particular on the work of Pierre Bourdieu and Merleau-Ponty, in order to explore the social relations and experiences of a distinct but largely ignored social group. The culture described in this book is not unique to Rotherham and Charlesworth argues that the themes and problems identified in this book will be familiar to economically powerless and politically dispossessed people everywhere.
Abstract:
A Social History of Knowledge II
Comments: Peter Burke follows up his magisterial Social History ofKnowledge, picking up where the first volume left off around1750 at the publication of the French Encyclopédie andfollowing the story through to Wikipedia. Like the previous volume,it offers a social history (or a retrospective sociology ofknowledge) in the sense that it focuses not on individuals but ongroups, institutions, collective practices and general trends.

The book is divided into 3 parts. The first argues thatactivities which appear to be timeless - gathering knowledge,analysing, disseminating and employing it - are in fact time-boundand take different forms in different periods and places. Thesecond part tries to counter the tendency to write a triumphalisthistory of the 'growth' of knowledge by discussing losses ofknowledge and the price of specialization. The third part offersgeographical, sociological and chronological overviews, contrastingthe experience of centres and peripheries and arguing that each ofthe main trends of the period - professionalization,secularization, nationalization, democratization, etc, coexistedand interacted with its opposite.

As ever, Peter Burke presents a breath-taking range ofscholarship in prose of exemplary clarity and accessibility. Thishighly anticipated second volume will be essential reading acrossthe humanities and social sciences.

Abstract:
A Sociology of Crime
Comments: ix, 303 p. ; 23 cm.

Includes bibliographical references (p. [272]-293) and indexes.
Abstract:
A Theory of Justice
Comments: XV, 607 p.

�ndices
Abstract:
A World of Their Own Making
Comments: print

xix, 310 p. : ill. ; 24 cm.

John R. Gillis.

Includes bibliographical references (241-298) and index.

Abstract:
A World of Their Own Making
Comments: Our whole society may be obsessed with "family values," but as John Gillis points out in this entertaining and eye-opening book, most of our images of "home sweet home" are of very recent vintage. A World of Their Own Making examines our idealized notion of "The Family," a mind-set in which myth and symbol still hold sway.
Abstract:
Absence of Myth, The
Comments: 'Surrealism', wrote Georges Bataille in 1945, 'has from the start given consistency to a "morality of revolt" and its most important contribution - important perhaps even in the political realm - is to have remained, in matters of morality, a revolution.'. For Bataille, 'the absence of myth' had itself become the myth of the modern age. In a world that had 'lost the secret of its cohesion', Bataille saw surrealism as both a symptom and the beginning of an attempt to address this loss. His writings on this theme - which he had hoped to assemble into a book and which are published here for the first time - mostly date from the immediate postwar period, and are the result of profound reflection in the wake of World War Two. In one respect they represent preliminary notes for his later work, especially for The Accursed Share and Theory of Religion. But many of the issues raised were never taken up again; therefore they offer a fresh perspective on his thinking at a decisive time. Together, these texts also comprise perhaps the most incisive study yet made of surrealism, insisting on its importance as a cultural and social phenomenon with far-reaching consequences. They clarify Bataille's links with the surrealist movement, and throw revealing light on his complex and greatly misunderstood relationship with Andre Breton. Above all, The Absence of Myth shows Bataille to be a much more radical figure than his postmodernist devotees would have us believe: a man who continually tried to extend Marxist social theory; a pessimistic thinker, but one as far removed from nihilism as can be.
Abstract:
Accounting for Oneself: Worth, Status, and the Social Order in Early Modern England
Comments: Accounting for Oneself is a major new study of the social order in early modern England, as viewed and articulated from the bottom up. Engaging with how people from across the social spectrum placed themselves within the social order, it pieces together the language of self-description deployed by over 13,500 witnesses in English courts when answering questions designed to assess their creditworthiness. Spanning the period between 1550 and 1728, and with a broad geographical coverage, this study explores how men and women accounted for their 'worth' and described what they did for a living at differing points in the life-cycle. A corrective to top-down, male-centric accounts of the social order penned by elite observers, the perspective from below testifies to an intricate hierarchy based on sophisticated forms of social reckoning that were articulated throughout the social scale. A culture of appraisal was central to the competitive processes whereby people judged their own and others' social positions. For the majority it was not land that was the yardstick of status but moveable property-the goods and chattels in people's possession ranging from livestock to linens, tools to trading goods, tables to tubs, clothes to cushions. Such items were repositories of wealth and the security for the credit on which the bulk of early modern exchange depended. Accounting for Oneself also sheds new light on women's relationship to property, on gendered divisions of labour, and on early modern understandings of work which were linked as much to having as to getting a living. The view from below was not unchanging, but bears witness to the profound impact of widening social inequality that opened up a chasm between the middle ranks and the labouring poor between the mid-sixteenth and mid-seventeenth centuries. As a result, not only was the social hierarchy distorted beyond recognition, from the later-seventeenth century there was also a gradual yet fundamental reworking of the criteria informing the calculus of esteem.
Abstract:
Accumulation of Capital, The
Comments: Originally published in 1956, The Accumulation of Capital provides a dynamic approach to the question of what determines growth and capital accumulation in the long run. Covering topics relating to finance, money and credit this work is prescient in the concerns it addresses.

The Accumulation of Capital is as relevant today as when it was first published. A true classic, it demonstrates Robinson's innovative approach to economics and her ability to embrace and extend the ideas of Marx, Keynes and Kalecki.

This re-issued classic contains a new introduction by Professor Geoff Harcourt and Prue Kerr who explore the influences of Keynes, Marx and Kaleki on this great work and examine the relevance of the growth model.
Abstract:
Acoustic World of Early Modern England, The
Comments: xiv, 386 p. : ill. ; 24 cm.

Includes bibliographical references (p. 343-365) and index. 1. Around. 1. Opening. 2. Mapping the Field. 3. The Soundscapes of Early Modern England: City, Country, Court. 4. Re: Membering. 5. Some Propositions Concerning O -- 2. Within. 6. Games, Gambols, Gests, Jests, Jibes, Jigs. 7. Ballads Within, Around, Among, Of, Upon, Against, Within. 8. Within the Wooden O. 9. Circling the Subject -- 3. Beyond. 10. Listen, Otherwise.
Abstract:
Adorno and Critical Theory
Comments: vi, 192 p. ; 22 cm.

Includes bibliographical references (p. [165]-187) and index.
Abstract:
Ageing and Popular Culture
Comments: print

xi, 247 p. : ill. ; 24 cm.

Andrew Blaikie.

Includes bibliographical references (p. 219-241) and index.

Abstract:
Agnes Bowker's Cat
Comments: xi, 351 p. : ill. ; 20 cm.

Originally published as Travesties and transgressions in Tudor and Stuart England, 2000. Includes bibliographical references and index.
Abstract:
Agrarian History of England and Wales, The
Comments: print

illus., plates, maps, plans, tables. 24 cm.

General editor, v. 1, pt. 1, v. 5, pt. 1-2, v. 8: Joan Thirsk.

Includes bibliographies.

Abstract:
Agrarian History of England and Wales:, The
Comments: Volume VIII of the Agrarian History of England and Wales was first published in 1978, and provides a technical, social and economic history of rural England and Wales in the years 1914-39. This period included four years of war, during which there was a rapid rise in prices, the post-war deflation and the depression. The author assesses the effects of these political and economic conditions on farming and farm workers. She describes regional variations in patterns of farming and the changes in methods of production by which farmers tried to reduce costs and increase output. She also examines the extension of government control over farming and the introduction of the marketing boards, and discusses the development of agricultural technology. Above all, she describes considers the conditions of life for the diminishing numbers of farm workers.
Abstract:
Agrarian Problem in the Sixteenth Century, The
Comments: print

xxv, 464 p. col. maps. 21 cm.

[by] R. H. Tawney. Introd. by Lawrence Stone.

Reprint, with a new introduction, of the 1912 ed.

Bibliography: p. xix-xxii.

Abstract:
Agrarian Problems in the Sixteenth Century and After
Comments: print

3-216 p. 23 cm.

Bibliographical footnotes.

Abstract:
Ale, Beer, and Brewsters in England
Comments: Women brewed and sold most of the ale drunk in medieval England, but after 1350, men slowly took over the trade. By 1600, most brewers in London - as well as in many towns and villages - were male, not female. Ale, Beer, and Brewsters in England investigates this transition, asking how, when, and why brewing ceased to be a women's trade and became a trade of men. Drawing on a wide variety of sources - such as literary and artistic materials, court records, accounts, and administrative orders - Judith Bennett vividly describes how brewsters (that is, female brewers) slowly left the trade. She tells a story of commercial growth, gild formation, changing technologies, innovative regulations, and finally, enduring ideas that linked brewsters with drunkenness and disorder. Examining this instance of seemingly dramatic change in women's status, Bennett argues that it included significant elements of continuity. Women might not have brewed in 1600 as often as they had in 1300, but they still worked predominantly in low-status, low-skilled, and poorly remunerated tasks. Using the experiences of brewsters to rewrite the history of women's work during the rise of capitalism, Ale, Beer, and Brewsters in England offers a telling story of the endurance of patriarchy in a time of dramatic economic change.
Abstract:
An Anatomy of Trade in Medieval Writing
Comments: print

x, 235 p. : ill. ; 24 cm.

Lianna Farber.

Includes bibliographical references (p. [215]-230) and index.

Abstract:
An Historical Geography of England and Wales
Comments: xx, 450 p. : ill. ; 24 cm.

Includes bibliographical references and index.
Abstract:
An Intimate History of Humanity
Comments: print

vii, 488 p. ; 24 cm.

Theodore Zeldin.

"Originally published in Great Britain in 1994 by Sinclair-Stevenson"--T.p. verso.

Includes bibliographical references and index.

Abstract:
An Introduction to Political Philosophy
Comments: print

viii, 215 p. ; 22 cm.

Jonathan Wolff.

Includes bibliographical references (p. [200]-209) and index.

Abstract:
An Introduction to Quantitative Methods for Historians
Comments:

Many statements made by historians are quantitative statements, involving the use of measurable historical evidence. The historian who uses quantitative methods to analyse and interpret such information needs to be well acquainted with the particular methods and techniques of analysis and to be able to make the best use of the data that are available. There is an increasing need for training in such methods and in the interpretation of the large volume of literature now using quantitative techniques. Dr Floud’s text, which is relevant to all branches of historical inquiry, provides a straightforward and intelligible introduction for all students and research workers.

The simpler and more useful techniques of descriptive and analytical statistics are described, up to the level of simple linear regression. Historical examples are used throughout, and great attention is paid to the need to ensure that the techniques are consistent with the quality of the data and with the historical problems they are intended to solve. Attention is paid to problems of the analysis of time series, which are of particular use to historians. No previous knowledge of statistics is assumed, and the simple mathematical techniques that are used are fully and clearly explained, without the use of more mathematical knowledge than is provided by an O-level course. A bibliography is provided to guide historians towards the most useful further reading. This student friendly text was first published in 1973.

Abstract:
An Introduction to Regional Geography
Comments: print

xvi, 299 p. : ill., maps ; 26 cm.

Paul Claval ; translated by Ian Thompson.

Includes bibliographical references (p. [288]-291) and index.

Abstract:
An Introduction to Social Constructionism
Comments: viii, 198 p. ; 22 cm.

Title from e-book title screen (viewed October 16, 2007). Includes bibliographical references (p. [186]-192) and indexes. Electronic reproduction.UK :MyiLibrary,2007Available via World Wide Web.
Abstract:
An Ordered Society
Comments:

The highly publicized obscenity trial of Radclyffe Hall's The Well of Loneliness (1928) is generally recognized as the crystallizing moment in the construction of a visible modern English lesbian culture, marking a great divide between innocence and deviance, private and public, New Woman and Modern Lesbian. Yet despite unreserved agreement on the importance of this cultural moment, previous studies often reductively distort our reading of the formation of early twentieth-century lesbian identity, either by neglecting to examine in detail the developments leading up to the ban or by framing events in too broad a context against other cultural phenomena.

Fashioning Sapphism locates the novelist Radclyffe Hall and other prominent lesbians--including the pioneer in women's policing, Mary Allen, the artist Gluck, and the writer Bryher--within English modernity through the multiple sites of law, sexology, fashion, and literary and visual representation, thus tracing the emergence of a modern English lesbian subculture in the first two decades of the twentieth century. Drawing on extensive new archival research, the book interrogates anew a range of myths long accepted without question (and still in circulation) concerning, to cite only a few, the extent of homophobia in the 1920s, the strategic deployment of sexology against sexual minorities, and the rigidity of certain cultural codes to denote lesbianism in public culture.

Abstract:
Analyzing Cultures
Comments: xiii, 413 p. : ill. ; 24 cm.

Includes bibliographical references (p. [371]-401) and index.
Abstract:
Anatomy of Disgust, The
Comments:

William Miller embarks on an alluring journey into the world of disgust, showing how it brings order and meaning to our lives even as it horrifies and revolts us. Our notion of the self, intimately dependent as it is on our response to the excretions and secretions of our bodies, depends on it. Cultural identities have frequent recourse to its boundary-policing powers. Love depends on overcoming it, while the pleasure of sex comes in large measure from the titillating violation of disgust prohibitions. Imagine aesthetics without disgust for tastelessness and vulgarity; imagine morality without disgust for evil, hypocrisy, stupidity, and cruelty.

Miller details our anxious relation to basic life processes: eating, excreting, fornicating, decaying, and dying. But disgust pushes beyond the flesh to vivify the larger social order with the idiom it commandeers from the sights, smells, tastes, feels, and sounds of fleshly physicality. Disgust and contempt, Miller argues, play crucial political roles in creating and maintaining social hierarchy. Democracy depends less on respect for persons than on an equal distribution of contempt. Disgust, however, signals dangerous division. The high's belief that the low actually smell bad, or are sources of pollution, seriously threatens democracy.

Miller argues that disgust is deeply grounded in our ambivalence to life: it distresses us that the fair is so fragile, so easily reduced to foulness, and that the foul may seem more than passing fair in certain slants of light. When we are disgusted, we are attempting to set bounds, to keep chaos at bay. Of course we fail. But, as Miller points out, our failure is hardly an occasion for despair, for disgust also helps to animate the world, and to make it a dangerous, magical, and exciting place.

Abstract:
Anatomy of Tudor Literature, The
Comments: x, 235 p. ; 23 cm.

Includes bibliographical references (p. 214-227) and index.
Abstract:
Anthropology of Friendship, The
Comments: xvi, 189 p. ; 24 cm.

Includes bibliographical references and index. The anthropology of friendship : enduring themes and future possibilities / Sandra Bell and Simon Coleman -- People who can be friends : selves and social relationships / James G. Carrier -- Friendship : the hazards of an ideal relationship / Robert Paine -- The importance of friendship in the the absence of states, according to the Icelandic sagas / E. Paul Durrenberger and Gisli P�lsson -- Building affinity through friendship / Claudia Barcellos Rezende -- The 'bones of friendship' : playing dominoes with Arthur of an evening in the Eagle Pub / Nigel Rapport -- Expressions of interest : friendship and guanxi in Chinese societies / Alan Smart -- Friendship, kinship and the life course in rural Auvergne / Deborah Reed-Danahay -- Friends and networks as survival strategies in North-east Europe / Ray Abrahams -- Localized kin and globalized friends : religious modernity and the 'educated self' in East Africa / Mario I. Aguilar.
Abstract:
Argument and Authority in Early Modern England
Comments: print

x, 399 p. ; 24 cm.

Conal Condren.

Includes bibliographical references (p. 353-390) and index.

Abstract:
Art of Forgetting, The
Comments: In tracing the process through which monuments give rise to collective memories, this path-breaking book emphasizes that memorials are not just inert and amnesiac spaces upon which individuals may graft their ever-shifting memories. To the contrary, the materiality of monuments can be seen to elicit a particular collective mode of remembering which shapes the consumption of the past as a shared cultural form of memory. In a variety of disciplines over the past decade, attention has moved away from the oral tradition of memory to the interplay between social remembering and object worlds. But research is very sketchy in this area and the materiality of monuments has tended to be ignored within anthropological literature, compared to the amount of attention given to commemorative practice. Art and architectural history, on the other hand, have been much interested in memorial representation through objects, but have paid scant attention to issues of social memory. Cross-cultural and interdisciplinary in scope, this book fills this gap and addresses topics ranging from material objects to physical space; from the contemporary to the historical; and from ‘high art’ to memorials outside the category of art altogether. In so doing, it represents a significant contribution to an emerging field.
Abstract:
Artisans in Europe, 1300-1914
Comments: ix, 306 p. : ill. ; 23 cm.

Includes bibliographical references and index.
Abstract:
As She Likes It
Comments: xii, 208 : ill. ; 23 cm.

Includes bibliographical references (p. 201-204) and index.
Abstract:
Available Light
Comments:

Clifford Geertz, one of the most influential thinkers of our time, here discusses some of the most urgent issues facing intellectuals today. In this collection of personal and revealing essays, he explores the nature of his anthropological work in relation to a broader public, serving as the foremost spokesperson of his generation of scholars, those who came of age after World War II. His reflections are written in a style that both entertains and disconcerts, as they engage us in topics ranging from moral relativism to the relationship between cultural and psychological differences, from the diversity and tension among activist faiths to "ethnic conflict" in today's politics.

Geertz, who once considered a career in philosophy, begins by explaining how he got swept into the revolutionary movement of symbolic anthropology. At that point, his work began to encompass not only the ethnography of groups in Southeast Asia and North Africa, but also the study of how meaning is made in all cultures--or, to use his phrase, to explore the "frames of meaning" in which people everywhere live out their lives. His philosophical orientation helped him to establish the role of anthropology within broader intellectual circles and led him to address the work of such leading thinkers as Charles Taylor, Thomas Kuhn, William James, and Jerome Bruner. In this volume, Geertz comments on their work as he explores questions in political philosophy, psychology, and religion that have intrigued him throughout his career but that now hold particular relevance in light of postmodernist thinking and multiculturalism. Available Light offers insightful discussions of concepts such as nation, identity, country, and self, with a reminder that like symbols in general, their meanings are not categorically fixed but grow and change through time and place.

This book treats the reader to an analysis of the American intellectual climate by someone who did much to shape it. One can read Available Light both for its revelation of public culture in its dynamic, evolving forms and for the story it tells about the remarkable adventures of an innovator during the "golden years" of American academia.

Abstract:
Bataille
Comments: viii, 224 p. ; 24 cm.

Includes bibliographical references (p. [214]-218) and index.
Abstract:
Behavior in Public Places
Comments: Erving Goffman effectively extends his argument in favor of a diagnosis of deviant behavior which takes account of the whole social situation.
Abstract:
Being-in-the-World
Comments:

Being-in-the-World is a guide to one of the most influential philosophical works of this century: Division I of Part One of Being and Time, where Martin Heidegger works out an original and powerful account of being-in-the-world which he then uses to ground a profound critique of traditional ontology and epistemology. Hubert Dreyfus's commentary opens the way for a new appreciation of this difficult philosopher, revealing a rigorous and illuminating vocabulary that is indispensable for talking about the phenomenon of world.The publication of Being and Time in 1927 turned the academic world on its head. Since then it has become a touchstone for philosophers as diverse as Marcuse, Sartre, Foucault, and Derrida who seek an alternative to the rationalist Cartesian tradition of western philosophy. But Heidegger's text is notoriously dense, and his language seems to consist of unnecessarily barbaric neologisms; to the neophyte and even to those schooled in Heidegger thought, the result is often incomprehensible.Dreyfus's approach to this daunting book is straightforward and pragmatic. He explains the text by frequent examples drawn from everyday life, and he skillfully relates Heidegger's ideas to the questions about being and mind that have preoccupied a generation of cognitive scientists and philosophers of mind.Hubert L. Dreyfus is Professor of Philosophy at the University of California, Berkeley.

Abstract:
Beliefs, Behaviors, & Alcoholic Beverages
Comments: Essays on the use of alcoholic beverages within diverse societies and cultures
Abstract:
Ben Jonson
Comments: viii, 399 p. : ill., ports. ; 25 cm.

Bibliography: p. 357-385.
Abstract:
Ben Jonson
Comments: Ben Jonson was the greatest of Shakespeare's contemporaries. In the century following his death he was seen by many as the finest of all English writers, living or dead. His fame rested not only on the numerous plays he had written for the theatre, but on his achievements over three decades as principal masque-writer to the early Stuart court, where he had worked in creative, and often stormy, collaboration with Inigo Jones. One of the most accomplished poets of the age, he had become - in fact if not in title - the first Poet Laureate in England. Jonson's life was full of drama. Serving in the Low Countries as a young man, he overcame a Spanish adversary in single combat in full view of both the armies. His early satirical play, The Isle of Dogs, landed him in prison, and brought all theatrical activity in London to a temporary -- and very nearly to a permanent -- standstill. He was 'almost at the gallows' for killing a fellow actor after a quarrel, and converted to Catholicism while awaiting execution. He supped with the Gunpowder conspirators on the eve of their planned coup at Westminster. After satirizing the Scots in Eastward Ho! he was imprisoned again; and throughout his career was repeatedly interrogated about plays and poems thought to contain seditious or slanderous material. In his middle years, twenty stone in weight, he walked to Scotland and back, seemingly partly to fulfil a wager, and partly to see the land of his forebears. He travelled in Europe as tutor to the mischievous son of Sir Walter Ralegh, who 'caused him to be drunken and dead drunk' and wheeled provocatively through the streets of Paris. During his later years he presided over a sociable club in the Apollo Room in Fleet Street, mixed with the most learned scholars of his day, and viewed with keen interest the political, religious, and scientific controversies of the day. Ian Donaldson's new biography draws on freshly discovered writings by and about Ben Jonson, and locates his work within the social and intellectual contexts of his time. Jonson emerges from this study as a more complex and volatile character than his own self-declarations (and much modern scholarship) would allow, and as a writer whose work strikingly foresees - and at times pre-emptively satirizes - the modern age.
Abstract:
Ben Jonson's Antimasques
Comments: print

vi, 207 p. ; 25 cm.

Lesley Mickel.

Includes bibliographical references (p. [193]-204) and index.

Abstract:
Beyond the Cultural Turn
Comments: print

xi, 350 p. ; 24 cm.

edited and with an introduction by Victoria E. Bonnell and Lynn Hunt ; essays by Richard Biernacki ... [et al.] ; with an afterword by Hayden White.

Papers presented at a conference held Apr. 26-27, 1996 in California.

Includes bibliographical references and index.

Abstract:
Birth, Marriage, and Death : Ritual, Religion, and the Life-Cycle in Tudor and Stuart England
Comments: From childbirth and baptism through to courtship, weddings, and funerals, every stage in the life-cycle of Tudor and Stuart England was accompanied by ritual. Even under the protestantism of the reformed Church, the spiritual and social dramas of birth, marriage, and death were graced with elaborate ceremony. Powerful and controversial protocols were in operation, shaped and altered by the influences of the Reformation, the Revolution, and the Restoration. Each of the major rituals was potentially an arena for argument, ambiguity, and dissent. Ideally, as classic rites of passage, these ceremonies worked to bring people together. But they also set up traps into which people could stumble, and tests which not everybody could pass. In practice, ritual performance revealed frictions and fractures that everyday local discourse attempted to hide or to heal. Using fascinating first-hand evidence, David Cressy shows how the making and remaking of ritual formed part of a continuing debate, sometimes strained and occasionally acrimonious, which exposed the raw nerves of society in the midst of great historical events. In doing so, he vividly brings to life the common experiences of living and dying in Tudor and Stuart England.
Abstract:
Black Swan, The
Comments: 5.2"x7.9"x0.9"; 0.7 lb; 366 pages

Abstract:
Blood, Bodies, and Families in Early Modern England
Comments: print

ix, 251 p. : ill. ; 24 cm.

Patricia Crawford.

Includes bibliographical references (p. [239]-244) and index.

Abstract:
Bodies That Matter
Comments: In Bodies That Matter, Judith Butler further develops her distinctive theory of gender by examining the workings of power at the most "material" dimensions of sex and sexuality. Deepening the inquiries she began in Gender Trouble, Butler offers an original reformulation of the materiality of bodies, examining how the power of heterosexual hegemony forms the "matter" of bodies, sex, and gender.
Butler argues that power operates to constrain "sex" from the start, delimiting what counts as a viable sex. She offers a clarification of the notion of "performativity" introduced in Gender Trouble and explores the meaning of a citational politics. The text includes readings of Plato, Irigaray, Lacan, and Freud on the formation of materiality and bodily boundaries; "Paris is Burning," Nella Larsen's "Passing," and short stories by Willa Cather; along with a reconsideration of "performativity" and politics in feminist, queer, and radical democratic theory.
Abstract:
Body and Society, The
Comments: 272 p. ; 23 cm.

Cover title: The body & society. Includes index. Bibliography: p. [252]-266.
Abstract:
Body, Culture, and Society, The
Comments: print

x, 146 p. ; 25 cm.

Philip Hancock ... [et al.].

Includes bibliographical references (p. [123]-136) and index.

Abstract:
Body, Culture, and Society, The
Comments: print

x, 146 p. ; 25 cm.

Philip Hancock ... [et al.].

Includes bibliographical references (p. [123]-136) and index.

Abstract:
Bonfires and Bells
Comments: print

xiv, 271 p. : ill. ; 25 cm.

David Cressy.

Title on spine: Bonfires & bells.

Includes bibliographical references (p. 241-264) and index.

Abstract:
Brenner Debate, The
Comments: Few historical issues have occasioned such discussion since at least the time of Marx as the transition from feudalism to capitalism in Western Europe. The Brenner Debate, which reprints from Past and Present various article in 1976, is a scholarly presentation of a variety of points of view, covering a very wide range in time, place and type of approach. Weighty theoretical responses to Brenner's first formulation followed from the late Sir Michael Postan, John Hatcher, Emmanuel Le Roy Ladurie and Guy Bois; more particular contributions came from Patricia Croot, David Parker, Arnost Klìma and Heide Wunder on England, France, Bohemia and Germany; and reflective pieces from R. H. Hilton and the late J. P. Cooper. Completing the volume, and giving it an overall coherence, are Brenner's own comprehensive response to those who had taken part in the debate, and also R. H. Hilton's introduction that aims to bring together the major themes in the collection of essays. The debate has already aroused widespread interest among historians and scholars in allied fields as well as among ordinary readers, and may reasonably be regarded as one of the most important historical debates of prevailing years.
Abstract:
Bride Ales and Penny Weddings
Comments: Some of the poorest regions of historic Britain had some of its most vibrant festivities. Between the sixteenth and nineteenth centuries, the peoples of northern England, Lowland Scotland, and Wales used extensive celebrations at events such as marriage, along with reciprocal exchange of gifts, to emote a sense of belonging to their locality. Bride Ales and Penny Weddings looks at regionally distinctive practices of giving and receiving wedding gifts, in order to understand social networks and community attitudes. Examining a wide variety of sources over four centuries, the volume examines contributory weddings, where guests paid for their own entertainment and gave money to the couple, to suggest a new view of the societies of 'middle Britain', and re-interpret social and cultural change across Britain. These regions were not old fashioned, as is commonly assumed, but differently fashioned, possessing social priorities that set them apart both from the south of England and from 'the Celtic fringe'. This volume is about informal communities of people whose aim was maintaining and enhancing social cohesion through sociability and reciprocity. Communities relied on negotiation, compromise, and agreement, to create and re-create consensus around more-or-less shared values, expressed in traditions of hospitality and generosity. Ranging across issues of trust and neighbourliness, recreation and leisure, eating and drinking, order and authority, personal lives and public attitudes, R. A. Houston explores many areas of interest not only to social historians, but also literary scholars of the British Isles.
Abstract:
Bridges of Medieval England, The
Comments: print

xix, 249 p. : ill., maps ; 25 cm.

David Harrison.

Includes bibliographical references (p. [233]-239) and index.

Abstract:
Bristol and Gloucestershire Lay Subsidy of 1523-1527, The
Comments: lx, 548 p. : map ; 26 cm.

Includes bibliographical references and indexes.
Abstract:
British America, 1500-1800
Comments: print

xix, 332 p. : maps ; 25 cm.

Steven Sarson.

Includes bibliographical references (p. [297]-321) and index.

Abstract:
British Clubs and Societies 1580-1800 : The Origins of an Associational World
Comments: Modern freemasonry was invented in London about 1717, but was only one of a surge of British associations in the early modern era which had originated before the English Revolution. By 1800, thousands of clubs and societies had swept the country. Recruiting widely from the urban affluent classes, mainly amongst men, they traditionally involved heavy drinking, feasting, singing, and gambling. They ranged from political, religious and scientific societies, artistic and literary clubs, to sporting societies, bee keeping, and birdfancying clubs, and a myriad of other associations.
Abstract:
British Cultural Studies
Comments: vii, 259 p. : ill. ; 24 cm.

Previous ed.: 1996. Includes bibliographical references and index.
Abstract:
British Drama Before 1660
Comments: print

ix, 261 p. : ill. ; 23 cm.

Jennifer R. Goodman.

Includes bibliographical references (p. 239-248) and index.

Abstract:
British Population History
Comments: print

v, 421 p. : ill. ; 23 cm.

edited by Michael Anderson.

Includes five essays originally appearing in Studies in economic and social history.

Includes bibliographical references (p. 403-409) and index.

Abstract:
British Population History
Comments: v, 421 p. : ill. ; 23 cm.

Includes five essays originally appearing in Studies in economic and social history. Includes bibliographical references (p. 403-409) and index.
Abstract:
British Subjects
Comments: xii, 340 p. : ill. ; 24 cm.

Includes bibliographical references and index.
Abstract:
Cambridge Companion to Ben Jonson, The
Comments: print

xvi, 218 p. ; 24 cm.

edited by Richard Harp and Stanley Stewart.

Includes bibliographical references (p. 202-209) and index.

Abstract:
Cambridge Companion to English Renaissance Drama, The
Comments: print

xviii, 463 p. : ill., maps ; 24 cm.

edited by A.R. Braunmuller and Michael Hattaway.

Includes bibliographical references (p. 372-419) and indexes.

Abstract:
Cambridge Companion to Medieval English Theatre, The
Comments: xxi, 372 p. : ill., map ; 23 cm.

Includes bibliographical references (p. 344-364) and indexes. An introduction to medieval English theatre / William Tydeman -- The theatricality of medieval English plays / Meg Twycross -- The York cycle / Richard Beadle -- The Chester cycle / David Mills -- The towneley cycle / Peter Meredith -- The N-Town plays / Alan J. Fletcher -- The non-cycle plays and the East Anglian tradition / John C. Coldewey -- The Cornish medieval drama / Brian O. Murdoch -- Morality plays / Pamela M. King -- Saints' plays / Darryll Grantley -- Modern productions of medieval English plays / John Marshall -- A guide to criticism of medievel English theatre / Peter Happ�.
Abstract:
Cambridge Companion to Shakespeare and Contemporary Dramatists, The
Comments: print

xxii, 298 p. : ill. ; 24 cm.

edited by Ton Hoenselaars.

Includes bibliographical references and index.

Abstract:
Cambridge Companion to Utopian Literature, The
Comments: print

xvi, 295 p.; 24 cm.

edited by Gregory Claeys.

Includes bibliographical references and index.

Abstract: "Since the publication of Thomas More's genre-defining work Utopia in 1516, the field of utopian literature has evolved into an ever-expanding domain. This Companion presents an extensive historical survey of the development of utopianism, from the publication of Utopia to today's dark and despairing tendency towards dystopian pessimism, epitomised by works such as George Orwell's Nineteen Eighty-Four and Margaret Atwood's The Handmaid's Tale. Chapters address the difficult definition of the concept of utopia, and consider its relation to science fiction and other literary genres. The volume takes an innovative approach to the major themes predominating within the utopian and dystopian literary tradition, including feminism, romance and ecology, and explores in detail the vexed question of the purportedly 'western' nature of the concept of utopia. The reader is provided with a balanced overview of the evolution and current state of a long-standing, rich tradition of historical, political and literary scholarship"--
Cambridge Companion to the Literature of London, The
Comments: print

xviii, 297 p. : ill. ; 23 cm.

edited by Lawrence Manley.

Includes bibliographical references and index.

Abstract: "London has provided the setting and inspiration for a host of literary works in English, from canonical masterpieces to the popular and ephemeral. Drawing upon a variety of methods and materials, the essays in this volume explore the London of Langland and the Peasants' Rebellion, of Shakespeare and the Elizabethan stage, of Pepys and the Restoration coffee house, of Dickens and Victorian wealth and poverty, of Conrad and the Empire, of Woolf and the wartime Blitz, of Naipaul and postcolonial immigration, and of contemporary globalism. Contributions from historians, art historians, theorists and media specialists as well as leading literary scholars exemplify current approaches to genre, gender studies, book history, performance studies and urban studies. In showing how the tradition of English literature is shaped by representations of London, this volume also illuminates the relationship between the literary imagination and the society of one of the world's greatest cities"--
Cambridge Introduction to Early English Theatre, The
Comments: This 2006 introduction offers an overview of early English theatre from the earliest recorded vernacular texts in the late medieval period to the closing of the theatres in 1642. Where most existing studies focus on one side or the other of an imaginary boundary between 'medieval' and 'early modern' or 'Renaissance' drama, this book examines the theatre of nearly three centuries in a way that highlights continuities as well as divisions. The study is organised into five subject-based chapters: Place and space; Actors and audiences; Writers, controllers and critics; Genre and tradition; Instruction and spectacle. It includes full chronologies, helpful text boxes and over twenty illustrations.
Abstract:
Cambridge Introduction to Jacques Derrida, The
Comments: Few thinkers of the latter half of the twentieth century have so profoundly and radically transformed our understanding of writing and literature as Jacques Derrida (1930–2004). Derridian deconstruction remains one of the most powerful intellectual movements of the present century, and Derrida's own innovative writings on literature and philosophy are crucially relevant for any understanding of the future of literature and literary criticism today. Derrida's own manner of writing is complex and challenging and has often been misrepresented or misunderstood. In this book, Leslie Hill provides an accessible introduction to Derrida's writings on literature which presupposes no prior knowledge of Derrida's work. He explores in detail Derrida's relationship to literary theory and criticism, and offers close readings of some of Derrida's best known essays. This introduction will help those coming to Derrida's work for the first time, and suggests further directions to take in studying this hugely influential thinker.
Abstract:
Cambridge Introduction to Narrative, The
Comments: print

xvii, 252 p. : ill. ; 23 cm.

H. Porter Abbott.

Includes bibliographical references (p. 223-227) and indexes.

Abstract:
Cambridge Urban History of Britain, The
Comments: print

3 v. : ill., maps ; 24 cm.

[general editor, Peter Clark].

Includes bibliographical references and indexes.

Abstract:
Cash Nexus, The
Comments: xix, 553p. ; 24cm.

Originally published: 2001. First paperback ed.: 2002. Bibliography: p.487-528.- Includes index.
Abstract:
Caste
Comments: This text examines the concept of caste, noting its origin in orientalist descriptions of Indian society, and showing how it made its way into social scientific discourse as a tool for the comparative analysis of social stratification. It reviews social scientists' accounts of caste in contemporary India, discussing the theoretical assumptions underlying such descriptions. The author takes issue with the view of caste which regards it as specific to Hindu India and makes a case for a comparative sociology concerned with social processes. The book represents a key text for students of comparative sociology and social anthropology, as well as those studying ethnicity, cultural difference and social and cultural change, religious studies, and others with an interest in Asian studies.
Abstract:
Casualties of Credit
Comments: print

ix, 348 p. ; 25 cm.

Carl Wennerlind.

Includes bibliographical references and index.

Abstract:
Các Thể Chế, Sự Thay Đổi Thể Chế, Và Hoạt Động Kinh Tế
Comments: print

303 p. ; 21 cm.

Douglass C. North ; [Trung tâm nghiên cứu Bắc Mỹ, biên dịch].

Translation of: Institutions, institutional change, and economic performance. New York : Cambridge University Press, 1990.

At head of title: Trung tâm khoa học xã hội và nhân vǎn quốc gia.

Includes bibliographical references (p. 291-303).

Abstract:
Centuries of Childhood
Comments: 414 p. ; 22 cm.

Translation of L'enfant et la vie familiale sous l'Ancien R�gime. Includes bibliographical references (p. [400]-404) and index.
Abstract:
Challenge of Affluence, The
Comments: xviii, 454 p. : ill. ; 24 cm.

Abstract:
Character of Credit, The
Comments: xii, 362 p. : ill. ; 24 cm.

Includes bibliographical references (p. 328-355) and index.
Abstract:
Chaucer to Spenser
Comments: print

xviii, 327 p. ; 24 cm.

edited by Derek Pearsall.

Companion vol. to: Chaucer to Spenser--an anthology.

Includes bibliographical references and index.

Abstract:
Cheap Print and Popular Piety, 1550-1640
Comments: This book looks at how popular religious belief was reflected in the cheapest printed wares available in England in the century after the Reformation: the broadside ballad, the woodcut picture and the chapbook (a small pamphlet, usually of 24 pages). Dr. Watt's study is illustrated throughout by extracts from these wares, many of which are being reproduced for the first time. The production of this "cheap print" is an important chapter in book trade history, showing the increasing specialization of the ballad trade, and tracing for the first time the beginnings of the chapbook trade in the early seventeenth century. But much of this print was not only read; it was also to be sung or pasted as decoration on the wall. The ballad is placed in the context of contemporary musical culture, and the woodcut is related to the decorative arts--wall painting and painted cloth--which have been neglected by mainstream historians. At the same time, the book challenges the picture drawn by recent historians of a great gulf between Protestantism and "popular culture," showing the continuity of many aspects of traditional pre-Reformation piety--modified by Protestant doctrine--well into the seventeenth century.
Abstract:
Childerley
Comments: In Childerley a twelfth-century church rises above the rolling quilt of pastures and grain fields. Volvos and tractors share the winding country roads. Here, in this small village two hours from London, stockbrokers and stock-keepers live side by side in thatched cottages, converted barns, and modern homes.

Why do these villagers find country living so compelling? Why, despite our urban lives, do so many of us strive for a home in the country, closer to nature? Michael Bell suggests that we are looking for a natural conscience: an unshakeable source of identity and moral value that is free from social interests—comfort and solace and a grounding of self in a world of conflict and change.

During his interviews with over a hundred of Childerley's 475 residents—both working-class and professional—Bell heard time and again of their desire to be "country people" and of their anxiety over their class identities. Even though they often knowingly participate in class discrimination themselves—and see their neighbors doing the same—most Childerleyans feel a deep moral ambivalence over class. Bell argues they find in class and its conflicts the restraints and workings of social interests and feel that by living "close to nature" they have an alternative: the identity of a "country person," a "villager that the natural consicence gives."

Yet there are clear parallels between the ways in which the villagers conceive of nature and of social life, and Bell traces these parallels across Childerleyans' perspectives on class, gender, and politics. Where conventional theories would suggest that what the villagers see as nature is a reflection of how they see society, and that the natural conscience must be a product of social interests, Bell argues that ideological processes are more complex. Childerleyans' understandings of society and of the natural conscience shape each other, says Bell, through a largely intuitive process he calls resonance.

For anyone who has ever lived in the countryside or considered doing so, this book is not to be missed. It will also be of particular interest to scholars of British studies and the sociology of knowledge and culture, and to those who work on problems of environment, community, class, and rural life.

"[An] exemplary piece of fieldwork. . . . These gentle conclusions . . . reminds us (when we most need reminding) of the skillful ethnographer's enduring capacity to make the everyday seem truly extraordinary."—Laurie Taylor, New Statesman & Society

"Bell's achievement, and his perceptions, are impressive."—J.W.M. Thompson, London Times

"Races along with all the gossipy compulsion of a blockbuster."—Frances Hardy, Daily Mill

"I believe this view of how people relate to the different domains of their experience is absolutely right. . . . The reader, this ready anyway, finishes Childerley with the feeling that she has just returned from visiting a remote Hampshire village and has learned something, not just about that place, but about human social life lived in other places and lived through place itself."—Wendy Griswold, American Journal of Sociology
Abstract:
Childhood Transformed
Comments: print

viii, 343 p. ; 23 cm.

Eric Hopkins.

Includes bibliographical references (p. [323]-333) and index.

Abstract:
Children and Childhood in Western Society Since 1500
Comments:

This book investigates the relationship between ideas about childhood and the actual experience of being a child, and assesses how it has changed over the span of five hundred years.  Hugh Cunningham tells an engaging story of the development of ideas about childhood from the Renaissance to the present, taking in Locke, Rosseau, Wordsworth and Freud, revealing considerable differences in the way western societites have understood and valued childhood over time.  His survey of parent/child relationships uncovers evidence of parental love, care and, in the frequent cases of child death, grief throughout the period, concluding that there was as much continuity as change in the actual relations of children and adults across these five centuries.

For undergraduate courses in History of the Family, European Social History, History of Children and Gender History.

Abstract:
Church Courts, Sex and Marriage in England, 1570-1640
Comments: Adultery, fornication, breach of marriage contract, sexual slander - these, along with religious offences of various kinds, were typical of the cases dealt with by the ecclesiastical courts in Elizabethan and early Stuart England. What was it like to live in a society in which personal morality was regulated by law in this fashion? How far-reaching was such surveillance in actual practice? How did ordinary people view the courts - as useful institutions upholding accepted standards, or as an alien system purveying unwanted values? How effective were the church courts in influencing attitudes and behaviour? Previous assessments of ecclesiastical justice, coloured by contemporary puritan and common law criticisms, have mostly been unfavourable. This in-depth, richly documented study of the sex and marriage business dealt with under church law, based on the records of the courts in Wiltshire, Cambridgeshire, Leicestershire and West Sussex in the period 1570-1640, presents a more balanced and more positive view.
Abstract:
Church and Childhood, The
Comments: print

xxiv, 530 p. : ill. ; 23 cm.

edited by Diana Wood.

Includes bibliographical references and index.

Abstract:
Church and Parish
Comments: 174 p., [8] p. of plates : ill. ; 23 cm.

Includes bibliographical references (p. [167]) and index.
Abstract:
Cities and Social Change in Early Modern France
Comments: print

251 p. : ill., maps ; 24 cm.

edited by Philip Benedict.

Includes bibliographical references and index.

Abstract:
Cities and the Rise of States in Europe, A.D. 1000 to 1800
Comments: print

v, 290 p. ; 24 cm.

edited by Charles Tilly and Wim P. Blockmans.

Some articles previously published in Theory and society, v. 18, no. 5 (Sept. 1989).

Includes bibliographical references (p. 251-279) and index.

Abstract:
Cities in a Global Society
Comments: "Cities in a Global Society is an impressive collection of essays focused on an important global redefinition. "Go Global" is a rapidly emerging theme of the 1990s, and this book is the definitive overview of cities that are doing so." --Michael Marien, Editor, Future Survey "This is one of the most significant public policy books to appear.... In essay after essay, this important volume makes clear a simple idea: That the culture, environment and economy of cities are increasingly influenced by forces well beyond the end of Main Street." --Bulletin of Municipal Foreign Policy As the year 2000 approaches, urbanized areas are entering a new era--one in which they will be shaped primarily by their responses to powerful global forces. The editors and contributors to this fascinating and timely volume believe that cities must begin to assess their roles in a global society and establish their strategic position and comparative advantage in the global marketplace. A wide range of essays by noted international scholars shows how national urban policies tend to be reactive, driven by problems rather than by opportunities, consequently reinforcing the passive nature of cities and their dependency on national initiatives. The diversity of their perspectives, analyses, observations, and insights helps to identify and define critical issues that cities are beginning to address as they become more internationally oriented. After first examining the role of cities in society, the contributors present several perspectives on a city futures management model and review strategies for developing global cities. This stimulating volume offers a wide range of innovative responses to these new challenges and will be useful to professionals and students in urban studies, economics, development studies, anthropology, international relations, future studies, political science, political theory, and sociology.
Abstract:
Civil Histories
Comments: print

xiii, 399 p. : ill. ; 24 cm.

edited by Peter Burke, Brian Harrison, and Paul Slack.

"The published writings of Keith Thomas, 1957-1998": p. [359]-377.

Includes bibliographical references and index.

Abstract:
Clash of Economic Ideas, The
Comments: The Clash of Economic Ideas interweaves the economic history of the last hundred years with the history of economic doctrines to understand how contrasting economic ideas have originated and developed over time to take their present forms. It traces the connections running from historical events to debates among economists, and from the ideas of academic writers to major experiments in economic policy. The treatment offers fresh perspectives on laissez faire, socialism, and fascism; the Roaring Twenties, business cycle theories, and the Great Depression; Institutionalism and the New Deal; the Keynesian Revolution; and war, nationalization, and central planning. After 1945, the work explores the postwar revival of invisible-hand ideas; economic development and growth, with special attention to contrasting policies and thought in Germany and India; the gold standard, the interwar gold-exchange standard, the postwar Bretton Woods system, and the Great Inflation; public goods and public choice; free trade versus protectionism; and finally fiscal policy and public debt. The investigation analyzes the theories of Adam Smith and earlier writers on economics when those antecedents are useful for readers.
Abstract:
Class Struggles
Comments:

In the 1960s and 1970s the study of history and sociology was heavily influenced by Marxism and theories of class. But the collapse of Communism and significant changes in culture and society threw the study of class into crisis. Its most basic premises were called into question.

More recently accelerating globalisation, proliferating multinational corporations and unbridled free-market capitalism have given the study of class a new significance and caused historians and sociologists to revisit the debate.

This book looks at the changes that caused the crisis in the study of class and shows how new, vibrant theories have appeared that will drive forward our understanding of history and sociology.

Abstract:
Class and Ethnicity
Comments: xiv, 180 p. : map ; 24 cm.

Includes bibliographical references (p. [160]-175) and index.
Abstract:
Class in Britain
Comments: xiii, 242 p. ; 24 cm.

Includes bibliographical references and index.
Abstract:
Closure or Critique
Comments:
Abstract:
Clothing Matters
Comments: What do I wear today? The way we answer this question says much about how we manage and express our identities. This detailed study examines sartorial style in India from the late nineteenth century to the present, showing how trends in clothing are related to caste, level of education, urbanization, and a larger cultural debate about the nature of Indian identity.

Clothes have been used to assert power, challenge authority, and instigate social change throughout Indian society. During the struggle for independence, members of the Indian elite incorporated elements of Western style into their clothes, while Gandhi's adoption of the loincloth symbolized the rejection of European power and the contrast between Indian poverty and British wealth. Similar tensions are played out today, with urban Indians adopting "ethnic" dress as villagers seek modern fashions.

Illustrated with photographs, satirical drawings, and magazine advertisements, this book shows how individuals and groups play with history and culture as they decide what to wear.
Abstract:
Coinage and State Formation in Early Modern English Literature
Comments: print

xvi, 268 p. ; 22 cm.

Stephen Deng.

Includes bibliographical references (p. [244]-257) and index.

Abstract:
Colonial and Postcolonial Literature
Comments: 351 p. : ill., maps ; 22 cm.

Includes bibliographical references (p. [294]-342) and index.
Abstract:
Coming of the Book, The
Comments:

Abstract:
Commensality: From Everyday Food to Feast
Comments: Throughout time and in all parts of the world, humans have eaten together socially. Commensality, eating and drinking together, is fundamentally a social activity which creates and cements bonds which define our place in society. Covering prehistoric archaeology, to medieval banquets, to the inaugural dinner of the American President to everyday commensality as we eat in our homes, with friends, in religious ceremonies and as a form of political activism, this rich collection provides a unique exploration of commensality.

Scholars from history, archaeology and anthropology have long studied the human practices and material culture and artefacts associated with communal eating and feasting, but until now these critical insights have not been presented in dialogue with one another. Uniquely, this book fuses insights from anthropologists, archaeologists, historians, religious studies and literary scholars to introduce a truly multidisciplinary and inclusive survey of commensality to the present day.

From the role of drinking in China to religious taboos to ancient cooking practices, this fascinating volume is indispensable reading for students and scholars of the anthropology, history and archaeology of food.
Abstract:
Commercial Crisis and Change in England, 1600-1642
Comments: print

xii, 296 p. 23 cm.

Bibliography: p. [268]-276.

Abstract:
Common Bodies
Comments: print

viii, 260 p. : ill. ; 24 cm.

Laura Gowing.

Includes bibliographical references (p. [238]-248) and index.

Abstract:
Common Lot, The
Comments: xiv, 270 p. : ill.

Includes bibliographical references and index.
Abstract:
Communities in Early Modern England
Comments: xii, 276 p. : facsims. ; 24 cm.

Includes bibliographical references (p. 253-267) and index.
Abstract:
Community
Comments: The increasing individualism of modern Western society has been accompanied by an enduring nostalgia for the idea of community as a source of security and belonging and, in recent years, as an alternative to the state as a basis for politics.

Gerard Delanty begins this stimulating introduction to the concept with an analysis of the origins of the idea of community in Western Utopian thought, and as an imagined primitive state equated with traditional societies in classical sociology and anthropology. He goes on to chart the resurgence of the idea within communitarian thought, the complications and critiques of multiculturalism, and its new manifestations within a society where new modes of communication produce both fragmentation and the possibilities of new social bonds. Contemporary community, he argues, is essentially a communication community based on new kinds of belonging. No longer bounded by place, we are able to belong to multiple communities based on religion, nationalism, ethnicity, life-styles and gender.
Abstract:
Community Life
Comments: First published in 1994. Routledge is an imprint of Taylor & Francis, an informa company.
Abstract:
Community of Kent and the Great Rebellion, 1640-60, The
Comments: print

356 p. 6 tables. 23 cm.

by Alan Everitt.

Bibliographical footnotes.

Abstract:
Computing for Historians
Comments: This guide is intended to introduce historians to some of the ways in which the computer revolution can be of benefit in dealing with their sources and presenting their findings.
Abstract:
Concepts of the Self
Comments: More than ten years on from its original publication, Concepts of the Self still mesmerizes with its insight, comprehensiveness and critique of debates over the self in the social sciences and humanities. Anthony Elliott has written a new preface to this third edition to address some of the most recent developments in the field, and offers a powerful challenge to what he describes as ‘the emergence of anti-theories of the self’.

The first two editions have proven exceptionally popular among students and teachers worldwide. Anthony Elliott provides a scintillating introduction to the major accounts of the self from symbolic interactionism and psychoanalysis to post-feminism and postmodernism. This new edition has been extensively revised and updated to take account of more recent theoretical developments, and a new chapter has been added on individualization which focuses on how the self becomes an agent of ‘do-it-yourself’ autobiographical reconstruction in an age of intensive globalization.

Concepts of the Self remains the most lively, lucid and compelling introduction to contemporary controversies over the self and self-identity in the social sciences and humanities. Written by an author of international reputation, it connects debates about the self directly to identity politics, the sociology of personal relationships and intimacy, and the politics of sexuality, and will continue to be an invaluable introductory text for students in of social and political theory, sociology, social psychology, cultural studies, and gender studies.
Abstract:
Constructing Death
Comments: print

x, 236 p. ; 24 cm.

Clive Seale.

Includes bibliographical references (p. 212-231) and index.

Abstract:
Consumer Behaviour and Material Culture in Britain, 1660-1760
Comments: xii, 252 p. : ill. ; 22 cm.

Includes index. Bibliography: p. [240]-243.
Abstract:
Consumer Culture and Postmodernism
Comments: xii, 164 p. ; 25 cm.

Spine title: Consumer culture & postmodernism. Includes bibliographical references and index.
Abstract:
Consumerism in World History
Comments: xi, 147 p. ; 24 cm.

Includes bibliographical references and index.
Abstract:
Consumption and the World of Goods
Comments: The study of past society in terms of what it consumes rather than what it produces is - relatively speaking - a new development. The focus on consumption changes the whole emphasis and structure of historical enquiry. While human beings usually work within a single trade or industry as producers, as, say, farmers or industrial workers, as consumers they are active in many different markets or networks. And while history written from a production viewpoint has, by chance or design, largely been centred on the work of men, consumption history helps to restore women o the mainstream.
The history of consumption demands a wide range of skills. It calls upon the methods and techniques of many other disciplines, including archaeology, sociology, social and economic history, anthropology and art criticism. But it is not simply a melting-pot of techniques and skills, brought to bear on a past epoch. Its objectives amount to a new description of a past culture in its totality, as perceived through its patterns of consumption in goods and services.
Consumption and the World of Goods is the first of three volumes to examine history from this perspective, and is a unique collaboration between twenty-six leading subject specialists from Europe and North America. The outcome is a new interpretation of the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries, one that shapes a new historical landscape based on the consumption of goods and services.
Abstract:
Contemporary Issues in the Sociology of Death, Dying and Disposal
Comments: This book utilises a dynamic analysis of mortality to acknowledge shifts of emphasis in cultural and religious traditions. A central concern is the diversity of representations of death to be found within the varying cultural, religious, medical and legal systems of contemporary western societies. Since the construction of death mores has social implications, a major element of the book is an examination of the way in which groups and individuals employ specific representations of mortality in order to generate meaning and purpose for life and death.
Abstract:
Contemporary Social Theory
Comments:

In this comprehensive, stylish and accessible introduction to contemporary social theory, Anthony Elliott examines the major social theoretical traditions. The first edition set new standards for introductory textbooks, such was the far-reaching sweep of social theorists discussed – including Theodor Adorno, Herbert Marcuse, Michel Foucault, Jacques Lacan, Jacques Derrida, Anthony Giddens, Pierre Bourdieu, Julia Kristeva, Jurgen Habermas, Judith Butler, Slavoj Zizek, Manuel Castells, Ulrich Beck, Zygmunt Bauman, Giorgio Agamben and Manuel De Landa.

From the Frankfurt School to globalization, from feminism to the network society, this new edition has been fully revised and updated, taking into account the most recent developments in social theory. The second edition also contains a completely new chapter on classical social theory, allowing students to contextualise the modern debates.

Like its predecessor, the second edition of Contemporary Social Theory combines stylish exposition with reflective social critique and original insights. This new edition will prove a superb textbook with which to navigate the twists and turns of contemporary social theory as taught in the disciplines of sociology, politics, history, cultural studies and many more.

Abstract:
Contested Hierarchies
Comments: print

364 p. : ill., maps ; 24 cm.

edited by David N. Gellner and Declan Quigley.

Includes bibliographical references (p. [332]-349) and index.

Abstract:
Contrasting Communities
Comments: This book is a detailed history of the economic, educational and religious life of three contrasting communities, Chippenham, Orwell and Willingham in Cambridgeshire from 1525 to 1700. The three villages had very difference economic settings, in which the pattern of landholding changed over this period and the general and particular reasons for the changes that took place. The study also covers the educational opportunities open to the villagers, and examines religious affairs, the effect on peasant communities of the Reformation and the disturbance in the devotional life of the ordinary villager, which often culminated in dissent and disruption under the Commonwealth. Dr Spufford has penetrated into the social life of the English village at all levels, and with fascinating detail has created a whole social universe around her villagers or a 'picture in the round' view. The book will be invaluable to economic, social, and ecclesiastical historians of England in the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries, as well as historians of Britain generally, and those with a special interest in Cambridgeshire.
Abstract:
Controlling Misbehavior in England, 1370-1600
Comments: xviii, 289 p. : ill. ; 24 cm.

Includes bibliographical references (p. 265-278) and index.
Abstract:
Cooking, Cuisine, and Class
Comments: print

viii, 253 p. : ill. ; 24 cm.

Jack Goody.

Includes index.

Bibliography: p. 234-245.

Abstract:
Cost of Inequality, The
Comments: How are we to regain economic growth? In this seminal new book based on 60 years of data, economist Stewart Lansley shows that economic equality is necessary for economic growth. Like a tumour, the economy for the rich has grown at least 10-fold in countries like Britain and the US, sucking in ever-increasing quantities money away from circulating in the real economy. 30 years after the creed that inequality is good for us all became common wisdom, it is clear that the experiment has failed and a world of two economies has grown up. In order to regain growth in the west, we need to dismantle the economy of the rich if we want to prevent a permanent recession.
Abstract:
Country And The City, The
Comments: In his brilliant survey of English literature, Williams examines changing attitudes towards country and city. This highly-acclaimed study reveals the shifting images and associations between these two traditional poles of life throughout the major developmental periods of English culture.
Abstract:
Country Towns in Pre-Industrial England
Comments: xiii, 258 p. : ill., maps ; 25 cm.

Includes bibliographies and index.
Abstract:
Country and the City Revisited, The
Comments: xiv, 258 p. : ill. ; 24 cm.

Includes bibliographical references and index.
Abstract:
Courtship and Constraint
Comments: This book is the first major study of courtship in early modern England. Courtship was a vitally important process in early modern England. It was a period of private and public negotiation, often fraught with anxiety. If completed successfully it brought respectability, the privileges of marriage and adulthood, and a stable union between socially, economically, and emotionally compatible couples. Using Kent church court and probate material dating from the 15th to the end of the 16th century, the book blends historical and anthropological perspectives to suggest novel and exciting approaches to the making of marriage.
Abstract:
Courtship, Illegitimacy, and Marriage in Early Modern England
Comments: A study of illegitimacy in England between 1538 and 1754, this text assembles data from over 500 parishes across the country, providing a detailed reconstruction of the lives and marital histories of the women and men who had children, both inside and outside marriage. A regional perspective is explored, providing evidence of a clear cleavage in the texture of courtship in England during this period. The survey shows the concept of national demographic data, often the basis of past research, to be deeply flawed. Offering a fresh look at contemporary attitudes towards marriage, the research is synthesized with original material from the ecclesiastical courts, in order to illustrate hitherto unsuspected regional contrasts in courtship behaviour in this period.
Abstract:
Crime and Mentalities in Early Modern England
Comments: print

xiii, 377 p. ; 24 cm.

Malcolm Gaskill.

Includes bibliographical references (p. [312]-364) and index.

Abstract:
Crime, Gender, and Social Order in Early Modern England
Comments: print

xvi, 310 p. : ill. ; 24 cm.

Garthine Walker.

Includes bibliographical references and index.

Abstract:
Crimes of Women in Early Modern Germany, The
Comments: ix, 292 p. : ill. ; 24 cm.

Includes bibliographical references (p. [264]-285) and index.
Abstract:
Crimes of Women in Early Modern Germany, The
Comments: 'The Crimes of Women in Early Modern Germany' is a fascinating study of 'deviant' women. It is the first scholarly account of how women were prosecuted for theft, infanticide, and sexual crimes in early modern Germany, and challenges the assumption that women were treated more leniently than men. Ulinka Rublack uses criminal trials to illuminate the social status and conflicts of women living through the Reformation and Thirty Years War, telling, for the first time, the stories of cutpurses, maidservants' dangerous liaisons, and artisans' troubled marriages. She provides a thought-provoking analysis of labelling and sentencing processes, and of the punishments inflicted on those found guilty. Above all, she brilliantly engages with the way 'ordinary' women experienced authority and sexuality, household and community.
Abstract:
Critical Theory Today
Comments:

This thoroughly updated third edition of Critical Theory Today offers an accessible introduction to contemporary critical theory, providing in-depth coverage of the most common approaches to literary analysis today, including: feminism; psychoanalysis; Marxism; reader-response theory; New Criticism; structuralism and semiotics; deconstruction; new historicism and cultural criticism; lesbian, gay, and queer theory; African American criticism and postcolonial criticism.

This new edition features:

  • a major expansion of the chapter on postcolonial criticism that includes topics such as Nordicism, globalization and the ‘end’ of postcolonial theory, global tourism and global conservation
  • an extended explanation of each theory, using examples from everyday life, popular culture, and literary texts
  • a list of specific questions critics ask about literary texts
  • an interpretation of F. Scott Fitzgerald's The Great Gatsby through the lens of each theory
  • a list of questions for further practice to guide readers in applying each theory to different literary works
  • updated and expanded bibliographies

Both engaging and rigorous, this is a "how-to" book for undergraduate and graduate students new to critical theory and for college professors who want to broaden their repertoire of critical approaches to literature.

Abstract:
Cultural Capitals
Comments: print

xii, 200 p. : ill., maps ; 25 cm.

Karen Newman.

Includes bibliographical references (p. [153]-193) and index.

Abstract:
Cultural Consumption and Everyday Life
Comments: xiii,191p ; 25cm.

Includes bibliographical references (p. [173]-182) and index.
Abstract:
Cultural History
Comments:
Abstract:
Cultural Sociology in Practice
Comments: ix, 265 p. : ill. ; 24 cm.

Includes bibliographical references (p. [237]-261) and index.
Abstract:
Cultural Theory and Late Modernity
Comments: viii, 312 p. : ill. ; 24 cm.

Includes bibliographical references (p. [281]-305) and index.
Abstract:
Cultural Theory and the Problem of Modernity
Comments: xiv, 188 p. ; 23 cm.

Includes bibliographical references (p. 181-185) and index.
Abstract:
Culture
Comments: ix, 262 p. ; 22 cm.

Includes bibliographical references (p. 240-255) and index.
Abstract:
Culture
Comments: viii, 148 p. ; 23 cm.

Includes bibliographical references and index.
Abstract:
Culture Through Time
Comments: Anthropological literature has traditionally been static and synchronic, only occasionally according a role to historical processes. but recent years have seen a burgeoning exchange between anthropology and history, each field taking on a powerful new dimension in consequence. Just what this means for anthropologists has not been clear, and this collection (eight core papers plus introduction and final commentary) introduces focus and direction to this interface between anthropology challenges several basic assumptions long held by anthropologists. Researchers can no longer be satisfied with approaches epitomized in 'the ethnographic present'. Society may be a bounded entity, but culture cannot be treated as such; a culture should be examined as it has interacted with other cultures and with its environment over time. Many traditionalists in anthropology, faced with these disturbing new challenges, fear the disintegration of the discipline; but these thoughtful papers demonstrate, on the contrary, its vitality, growth, and promise.
Abstract:
Culture and Agency
Comments: xxix, 351 p. ; 24 cm.

Includes bibliographical references (p. 316-347) and index.
Abstract:
Culture and Cultivation in Early Modern England
Comments: print

xiii, 241 p. : ill. ; 24 cm.

edited by Michael Leslie and Timothy Raylor.

Includes bibliographical references and index.

Abstract:
Culture and History, 1350-1600
Comments:
Abstract:
Culture and Politics in Early Stuart England
Comments: print

x, 382 p. : ill. ; 23 cm.

edited by Kevin Sharpe and Peter Lake.

Includes bibliographical references (p. 311-371) and index.

Abstract:
Culture and Power in England, 1585-1685
Comments: print

xi, 201 p. : ill. ; 23 cm.

R. Malcolm Smuts.

Includes bibliographical references (p. 185-192) and index.

Abstract:
Culture of Capital, The
Comments: print

x, 304 p. : ill. ; 24 cm.

edited by Henry S. Turner.

Includes bibliographical references and index.

Abstract:
Culture of Fashion, The
Comments: This illustrated survey of 600 years of fashion investigates its cultural and social meanings from medieval Europe to 20th-century America. It provides a guide to the changes in style and taste, and challenges existing fashion histories, showing that clothes have always played a pivotal role in defining a sense of identity and society, especially when concerned with sexual and body politics. With a chronological structure, each chapter focuses on both male and female fashion of a specific period, covering its fascinating developments. It discusses: andrognous dressing; body piercing; fabrics, clothing and the rise of city life; dress, and the changing shape of the human body; controversies surrounding trousers and leg wear for both men and women; exposure of flesh; fashion and social status; and the dissemination of fashion through travel, film, magazines and catwalk shows.
Abstract:
Culture of Food, The
Comments: print

xii, 214 p. ; 24 cm.

Massimo Montanari ; translated by Carl Ipsen.

Includes bibliographical references (p. [194]-205) and index.

Abstract:
Culture of Giving, The
Comments: print

xi, 426 p. ; 25 cm.

Ilana Krausman Ben-Amos.

Includes bibliographical references (p. 390-417) and index.

Abstract:
Culture of Power and the Power of Culture, The
Comments: In this fascinating new account of Old Regime Europe, T. C. W. Blanning explores the cultural revolution which transformed eighteenth-century Europe. During this period the court culture exemplified by Louis XIV's Versailles was pushed from the centre to the margins by the emergence of a new kind of space - the public sphere. The author shows how many of the world's most important cultural institutions developed in this space: the periodical, the newspaper, the novel, the lending library, the coffee house, the voluntary association, the journalist, and the critic. It was here that public opinion staked its claim to be the ultimate arbiter of culture and politics. For the established order this new force was to prove both a challenge and an opportunity and the author's comparative study of power and culture shows how regimes sought to keep their balance as the ground moved beneath their feet. In the process he explains, among other things, why Britain won the 'Second Hundred Years War' against France, how Prussia rose to become the dominant power in German-speaking Europe, and why the French monarchy collapsed.
Abstract:
Culture of Usury in Renaissance England, The
Comments: print

200 p. ; 22 cm.

David Hawkes.

Includes bibliographical references and index.

Abstract:
Custom, Improvement and the Landscape in Early Modern Britain
Comments: print

x, 317 p. : ill. ; 25 cm.

edited by Richard W. Hoyle.

Includes bibliographical references and index.

Abstract:
Dangerous Talk
Comments: print

xiii, 374 p. ; 24 cm.

by David Cressy.

Includes bibliographical references and index.

Abstract:
Databases in Historical Research
Comments: xvi, 331 p. : ill., maps ; 24 cm.

Includes bibliographical references (p. 297-319) and index.
Abstract:
Daughters, Wives, and Widows
Comments:
Abstract:
Death and the Regeneration of Life
Comments: It is a classical anthropological paradox that symbols of rebirth and fertility are frequently found in funerary rituals throughout the world. The original essays collected here re-examine this phenomenon through insights from China, India, New Guinea, Latin America, and Africa. The contributors, each a specialist in one of these areas, have worked in close collaboration to produce a genuinely innovative theoretical approach to the study of the symbolism surrounding death, an outline of which is provided in an important introduction by the editors. The major concern of the volume is the way in which funerary rituals dramatically transform the image of life as a dialectic flux involving exchange and transaction, marriage and procreation, into an image of a still, transcendental order in which oppositions such as those between self and other, wife-giver and wife-taker, Brahmin and untouchable, birth and therefore death have been abolished. This transformation often involves a general devaluation of biology, and, particularly, of sexuality, which is contrasted with a more spiritual and controlled source of life. The role of women, who are frequently associated with biological processes, mourning and death pollution, is often predominant in funerary rituals, and in examining this book makes a further contribution to the understanding of the symbolism of gender. The death rituals and the symbolism of rebirth are also analysed in the context of the political processes of the different societies considered, and it is argued that social order and political organisation may be legitimated through an exploitation of the emotions and biology.
Abstract:
Death in Towns
Comments: print

vi, 258 p. : ill., maps ; 24 cm.

edited by Steven Bassett.

Papers from a conference, April 19-21, 1991, organized by the Urban Research Committee of the University of Birmingham.

Includes bibliographical references and index.

Abstract:
Death, Burial and the Individual in Early Modern England
Comments:
Abstract:
Death, Religion, and the Family in England, 1480-1750
Comments: The interest and importance of the social history of death have been increasingly recognized during the last thirty years. Ralph Houlbrooke examines the effects of religious change on the English `way of death' between 1480 and 1750. He discusses relatively neglected aspects of the subject, such as the death-bed, will making, and the last rites. He also examines the rich variety of commemorative media and practices and is the first to describe the development of the English funeral sermon between the late Middle Ages and the eighteenth century. Dr Houlbrooke shows how the need of the living to remember the dead remained important throughout the later medieval and early modern periods, even though its justification and means of expression changed.
Abstract:
Debt: The First 5, 000 Years
Comments: 224 pages

Abstract:
Decline of Life, The
Comments: print

xiv, 322 p. : ill. ; 24 cm.

Susannah R. Ottaway.

Includes bibliographical references (p. 284-314) and index.

Abstract:
Defining Dress
Comments: This collection of essays brings together many separate but related issues which form the focus of contemporary research into the history of dress. Historically, in Britain at least, investigations of dress were primarily informed by historical and empirical protocols, although the symbolic meaning of dress was explored by anthroplogists and sociologists, who tended to concentrate on either non-Western cultures or British or Western sub-cultures. In recent years these approaches have moved closer together partly as a result of the impact of feminism.
Abstract:
Dekker and Heywood
Comments: Each generation needs to be introduced to the culture of the past and to reinterpret it in its own ways. This series re-examines the important English dramatists of earlier centuries in the light of new information, new interests and new attitudes. The books are written for students, theatre-goers and general readers who want an up-to-date view of the plays and dramatists, with an emphasis on drama as theatre, in the context of their stage, social and political history.
Abstract:
Deleuze and Philosophy
Comments: print

x, 277 p. ; 24 cm.

edited by Keith Ansell Pearson.

Includes bibliographical references and index.

Abstract:
Demography of Early Modern Towns, The
Comments: xiv, 220 p. : ill. ; 24 cm.

Includes bibliographical references (p. [200]-214) and index.
Abstract:
Derbyshire Hearth Tax Assessments 1662-70
Comments: lxxv, 225 p., [4] p. of plates : ill., maps ; 22 cm.

Includes bibliographical references and indexes.
Abstract:
Desolation of a City
Comments: print

xx, 350 p. : ill. ; 23 cm.

Charles Phythian-Adams.

Includes index.

Bibliography: p. 325-337.

Abstract:
Development as Freedom
Comments: In Development as Freedom Amartya Sen quotes the eighteenth century poet William Cowper on freedom: Freedom has a thousand charms to show, That slaves howe'er contented, never know. Sen explains how in a world of unprecedented increase in overall opulence, millions of people living in rich and poor countries are still unfree. Even if they are not technically slaves, they are denied elementary freedom and remain imprisoned in one way or another by economic poverty, socialdeprivation, political tyranny or cultural authoritarianism. The main purpose of development is to spread freedom and its 'thousand charms' to the unfree citizens. Freedom, Sen persuasively argues, is at once the ultimate goal of social and economic arrangements and the most efficient means of realizing general welfare. Social institutions like markets, political parties, legislatures, the judiciary, and the media contribute to development by enhancing individual freedom and are in turnsustained by social values. Values, institutions, development, and freedom are all closely interrelated, and Sen links them together in an elegant analytical framework. By asking "What is the relation between our collective economic wealth and our individual ability to live as we would like?" and by incorporating individual freedom as a social commitment into his analysis, Sen allows economics once again, as it did in the time of Adam Smith, to address the social basis of individual well-beingand freedom.
Abstract:
Development of the Family and Marriage in Europe, The
Comments: print

xii, 308 p. : ill. ; 23 cm.

Jack Goody.

Includes index.

Bibliography: p. 279-294.

Abstract:
Dictionary of Demography, The
Comments: xii, 243 p. ; 25 cm.

Abstract:
Diocesan Population Returns for 1563 and 1603, The
Comments: print

lxxxv, 595 p. : ill., maps ; 24 cm.

edited by Alan D. Dyer, David M. Palliser.

Includes bibliographical references (p. 525-531) and index.

Abstract:
Disciplining Punishment
Comments: print

vi, 283 p. : ill., map ; 23 cm.

Satadru Sen.

Includes bibliographical references (p. [275]-278) and index.

Abstract:
Discontinuities
Comments: xx, 244 p. : 24 cm.

Includes bibliographical references and index.
Abstract:
Disorderly Women in Eighteenth-Century London
Comments: This is the first full-length study of prostitution in London during the eighteenth and early nineteenth centuries. It is a compelling account, exposing the real lives of the capital's prostitutes, and also shedding light on London society as a whole, its policing systems and its attitudes towards the female urban poor. Drawing on the archives of London's parishes, jury records, reports from Southwark gaol as well as other sources which have been overlooked by historians, it provides a fascinating study for all those interested in Georgian society.
Abstract:
Disrespect
Comments: xiii, 275 p. ; 24 cm

"First published in Greman as Das Andere der Gerechtigkeit"--T.p. verso. Includes bibliographical references and index.
Abstract:
Distinction
Comments:
Abstract:
Domestic Dangers
Comments: `What else is woman but a foe to friendship ... a domestic danger?' Sexual morality was central to the patriarchal society of sixteenth- and seventeenth-century England, as demonstrated by this quotation taken from a biblical commentary by St John Chrysostom. In a fascinating and original book, Laura Gowing considers what gender difference meant in the practice of daily life, examining the working of gender relations in sex, courtship, marriage, conflict and verbal disputes. Her focus isthe richly detailed and hitherto unused records of litigation over sexual insult, contracts of marriage and marriage separation in London c.1560-1640. Gowing takes a new approach to these legal testimonies. She reads them as texts with complicated layers of meaning in order to reveal precisely how culture, language, stories and experience connected. Arguing that women's and men's sexual honour had such different meanings as to make them incommensurable, she reveals how, in every area of sex and marriage , women were perceived as acting differently, and with different results, from men. This is the first analysis of women's special experiences in the metropolis, and presents powerful evidence for women's use of legal agency. From the formal world of law to the daily world of the street, Domestic Dangers reveals the organization of gender relations and the shape of women's lives in early modern London.
Abstract:
Domination and Resistance
Comments: xx, 332 p : ill., maps, plans ; 24 cm.

"First published in 1989 by Unwin Hyman Ltd" - t.p. verso.
Abstract:
Domination and the Arts of Resistance
Comments:
Abstract:
Drama and Religion in English Provincial Society, 1485-1660
Comments: xii, 247 p. : ill., maps ; 24 cm.

Includes bibliographical references (p. 214-229) and index. Drama and religion in the English parish -- The parish Robin Hood and religious guilds -- Civic biblical drama in the age of reformation -- Theater, religion, and town-gown conflict in Cambridge -- Bishops, recusants, and household theater -- Traveling troupes and regional religion -- From Mankind to Mucedorus.
Abstract:
Dressing Up
Comments: 6.9"x9.8"x1.2"; 2.5 lb; 352 pages

Dressing Up shows why clothes made history and history can be about clothes. It imagines the Renaissance afresh by considering people's appearances: what they wore, how this made them move, what images they created, and how all this made people feel about themselves. Using an astonishing array of sources, Ulinka Rublack argues that an appreciation of people's relationship to appearances and images is essential to an understanding of what it meant to live at this time - and ever since. We read about the head accountant of a sixteenth-century merchant firm who commissioned 136 images of himself elaborately dressed across a lifetime; students arguing with their mother about which clothes they could have; or Nuremberg women wearing false braids dyed red or green. This brilliantly illustrated book draws on a range of insights across the disciplines and allows us to see an entire period in new ways. In integrating its findings into larger arguments about consumption, visual culture, the Reformation, German history, and the relationship of European and global history, it promises to re-shape the field.
Abstract:
Early Modern City, 1450-1750, The
Comments: x, 381 p. : ill., map ; 22 cm.

Includes bibliographical references (p. 347-369) and index.
Abstract:
Early Modern English Literature
Comments: vi, 325 p. : ill., maps ; 23 cm.

Includes bibliographical references (p. [288]-317) and index.
Abstract:
Early Modern Things
Comments:

What can we learn about the past by studying things? How does the meaning of things, and our relationship to them, change over time? This fascinating collection taps a rich vein of recent scholarship to explore a variety of approaches to the material culture of the early modern world (c.1500-1800).

Divided into six parts this book explores; the ambiguity of things, representing things, making things, empires of things, consuming things and lastly the power of things. Spanning across the early modern world, from Ming dynasty China to Georgian England, and from Ottoman Egypt to Spanish America, the authors provide a generous set of examples in how to study the circulation, use, consumption and, most fundamentally, the nature of things themselves.

Drawing on a broad range of disciplinary perspectives and lavishly illustrated, Early Modern Things supplies fresh and provocative insights into how objects – ordinary and extraordinary, secular and sacred, natural and man-made – came to define some of the key developments of the early modern world. This book will be essential reading for all those interested in the early modern world.

Abstract:
Early Modern Town, The
Comments: print

viii, 332 p. ; 22 cm.

edited with an introd. by Peter Clark.

Includes bibliographical references and index.

Abstract:
Earthly Necessities
Comments: xii, 372 p. ; 25 cm.

Includes bibliographical references and index.
Abstract:
Economic Expansion and Social Change: England 1500-1700: Volume 2, Industry, Trade and Government
Comments: Historical understanding of the dynamics of economic and social change in the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries has been transformed in the last twenty or thirty years by an enormous volume of original research. A fascinating picture has emerged of an economy and society in turmoil under the influence of population growth, inflation, the commercialisation of agriculture, the growth of a huge capital city, the emergence of distinct forms of manufacturing, and changes in the international economic context. Traditional forms of production, traditional social structures, and traditional values, all came under increasingly insistent attack from the forces of change, leading to radical economic and social readjustments. In this book, Christopher Clay draws on this flourishing research to provide a lucidly written analysis of the economy and society of England in the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries, logically organised on a thematic rather than a chronological basis.
Abstract:
Economics
Comments: 704 p. : ill. ; 26 cm.

Previous ed.: published as Principles of economics. 1999. Bibliography.
Abstract:
Economy of Obligation, The
Comments: This book is an excellent work of scholarship. It seeks to redefine the early modern English economy by rejecting the concept of capitalism, and instead explores the cultural meaning of credit which resulted from the way in which it was economically structured. It is a major argument of the book that money was used only in a limited number of exchanges, and that credit in terms of household reputation was a "cultural currency" of trust used to transact most business. As the market expanded in the late-sixteenth century such trust became harder to maintain, leading to an explosion of debt litigation, which in turn resulted in social relations being partially redefined in terms of contractual equality.
Abstract:
Education in Early Modern England
Comments: viii, 231 p. ; 23 cm.

This book offers a comprehensive survey of the developments in education in England throughout the early modern period. Helen Jewell presents an analysis of the aims, facilities and achievements across all levels of education in England, institutional and informal. Education in the rest of the British Isles, Western Europe and North America is also selectively surveyed, as the development of English education was part of a common Western tradition.

Includes bibliographical references (p. 196-216) and index.
Abstract:
Elizabethans
Comments: print

xii, 265 p. : ill. ; 24 cm.

Patrick Collinson.

Includes bibliographical references and index.

Abstract:
Emotions and Sociology
Comments: print

175 p. ; 23 cm.

edited by Jack Barbalet.

Includes bibliographical references and index.

Abstract:
Empire of Fashion, The
Comments: print

x, 276 p. ; 25 cm.

Gilles Lipovetsky ; translated by Catherine Porter ; with a foreword by Richard Sennett.

Includes bibliographical references (p. [265]-270) and index.

Abstract:
Encyclopedia of Social and Cultural Anthropology
Comments:

Written by leading scholars in the field, this comprehensive and readable resource gives anthropology students a unique guide to the ideas, arguments and history of the discipline. The fully revised and expanded second edition reflects major changes in anthropology in the past decade.

Abstract:
Ends of Life, The
Comments: print

xiv, 393 p., 14 p. of plates : ill. ; 25 cm.

Keith Thomas.

"This book is a revised and expanded version of the Ford lectures given in the University of Oxford in Hilary term 2000"--Pref.

Includes bibliographical references (p. 273-367) and index.

Abstract:
Energy and the English Industrial Revolution
Comments: print

xiii, 272 p. : ill. ; 24 cm.

E.A. Wrigley.

Includes bibliographical references and index.

Abstract: "The industrial revolution transformed the productive power of societies. It did so by vastly increasing the individual productivity, thus delivering whole populations from poverty. In this new account by one of the world's acknowledged authorities the central issue is not simply how the revolution began but still more why it did not quickly end. The answer lay in the use of a new source of energy. Pre-industrial societies had access only to very limited energy supplies. As long as mechanical energy came principally from human or animal muscle and heat energy from wood, the maximum attainable level of productivity was bound to be low. Exploitation of a new source of energy in the form of coal provided an escape route from the constraints of an organic economy but also brought novel dangers. Since this happened first in England, its experience has a special fascination, though other countries rapidly followed suit"--
Enforcement of English Apprenticeship, The
Comments: print

x, 319 p. 22 cm.

Bibliography: p. [281]-301.

Abstract:
England on Edge
Comments: England on Edge deals with the collapse of the government of Charles I, the disintegration of the Church of England, and the accompanying cultural panic that led to civil war. Focused on the years 1640 to 1642, it examines stresses and fractures in social, political, and religious culture, and the emergence of an unrestrained popular press. Hundreds of people not normally seen in historical surveys make appearances here, in a drama much larger than the struggle of king and parliament. Historians commonly assert that royalists and parliamentarians parted company over issues of principle, constitutional scruples, and religious belief, but a more complex picture emerges from the environment of anxiety, mistrust, and fear.

Rather than seeing England's revolutionary transformation as a product of the civil war, as has been common among historians, David Cressy finds the world turned upside down in the two years preceding the outbreak of hostilities. The humbling of Charles I, the erosion of the royal prerogative, and the rise of an executive parliament were central features of the revolutionary drama of 1640-1642. The collapse of the Laudian ascendancy, the splintering of the established church, the rise of radical sectarianism, and the emergence of an Anglican resistance all took place in these two years before the beginnings of bloodshed. The world of public discourse became rapidly energized and expanded, in counterpoint with an exuberantly unfettered press and a deeply traumatized state.

These linked processes, and the disruptive contradictions within them, made this a time of shaking and of prayer. England's elite encountered multiple transgressions, some more imagined than real, involving lay encroachments on the domain of the clergy, lowly intrusions into matters of state, the city clashing with the court, the street with institutions of government, and women undermining the territories of men. The simultaneity, concatenation, and cumulative, compounding effect of these disturbances added to their ferocious intensity, and helped to bring down England's ancien regime. This was the revolution before the Revolution, the revolution that led to civil war.
Abstract:
England's Population
Comments: x, 291 p. : ill., maps ; 24 cm.

Includes bibliographical references and index.
Abstract:
English Alehouse, The
Comments: xiv, 353 p., [16] p. of plates : ill. ; 24 cm.

Includes bibliographical references and index.
Abstract:
English Civic Pageantry, 1558-1642
Comments: print

x, 325 p. illus. 23 cm.

by David M. Bergeron.

Bibliography: p. 311-319.

Abstract:
English Drama Before Shakespeare
Comments: xi, 291 p. ; 23 cm.

Includes bibliographical references (p. [265]-282) and index.
Abstract:
English Family, 1450-1700, The
Comments: print

vii, 272 p. ; 22 cm.

Ralph A. Houlbrooke.

Includes index.

Bibliography: p. [255]-263.

Abstract:
English Masculinities, 1660-1800
Comments: x, 268 p. ; 23 cm.

Includes bibliographical references (p. 239-258) and index.
Abstract:
English Rural Community, The
Comments: This book examines the English rural community, past and present, in its variety and dynamism. The distinguished team of contributors brings a variety of disciplinary perspectives to bear upon the central issues of movement and migration; the farm family and rural labour force; the development of contrasting rural communities; the portrayal of rural labour in both 'high' and popular culture; the changing nature of religious practice in the English countryside; the rural/urban fringe, and the spread of notions of a rural English arcadia within a predominantly urban society. Fully illustrated with accompanying maps, paintings and photographs, The English Rural Community provides an important and innovative overview of a subject where history, myth and debate are inseparably entwined. A full bibliography will assist a broad range of general readers and students of social history, historical geography and development studies approaching the subject for the first time, and the whole should establish itself as the central analytical account in an area where image and reality are notoriously hard to unravel.
Abstract:
English Rural Society, 1500-1800
Comments: x, 384 p. : port.

Bibliography: p.369-382. Includes index.
Abstract:
English Small Town Life
Comments:
Abstract:
English Society 1580-1680
Comments:

Abstract:
English Towns in Transition 1500-1700
Comments:
Abstract:
English Towns, 1500-1700
Comments: 348 p. : ill., maps ; 23 cm.

Includes bibliographical references and index
Abstract:
English Urban Renaissance, The
Comments: xxii, 416 p. : ill., maps ; 22cm.

"Clarendon paperbacks" Bibliography: p.369-400 - Includes index.
Abstract:
English Yeoman, The
Comments: 5.2"x8.4"x1.3"; 1.4 lb; 472 pages

Abstract:
Englishness Identified
Comments: print

x, 389 p. : ill. ; 25 cm.

Paul Langford ; illustrated by Martin Rowson.

Includes bibliographical references (p. [321]-375) and index.

Abstract:
Enlightenment's Wake
Comments:

John Gray is the bestselling author of such books as Straw Dogs and Al Qaeda and What it Means to be Modern which brought a mainstream readership to a man who was already one of the UK's most well respected thinkers and political theorists.

Gray wrote Enlightenment’s Wake in 1995 – six years after the fall of the Berlin Wall and six years before the terrorist attacks on the World Trade Center. Turning his back on neoliberalism at exactly the moment that its advocates were in their pomp, trumpeting 'the end of history' and the supposedly unstoppable spread of liberal values across the globe, Gray’s was a lone voice of scepticism. The thinking he criticised here would lead ultimately to the invasion of Iraq. Today, its folly might seem obvious to all, but as this edition of Enlightenment’s Wake shows, John Gray has been trying to warn us for some fifteen years – the rest of us are only now catching up with him.

Abstract:
Essays in Economic History
Comments: print

3 v. map, diagrs., tables. 26 cm.

reprints edited for the Economic History Society.

Bibliographical footnotes.

Abstract:
Essays in Economic History
Comments: print

3 v. illus. 25 cm.

edited for the Economic History Society by E. M. Carus-Wilson.

Bibliographical footnotes.

Abstract:
Essays in the Economic and Social History of Tudor and Stuart England, in Honour of R. H. Tawney
Comments: print

235 p. port., tables. 23 cm.

Bibliographical footnotes.

Abstract:
Established and the Outsiders, The
Comments: In The Established and the Outsiders. Elias and Scotson explain differences in power and rank between two very similar groups - both working class - in a local community studied in the early 1960s. They show how one group monopolized sources of power and used them to exclude and stigmatize members of the other, pinpointing the role of gossip in the process. In a later theoretical introduction. Elias advanced a general theory of power relations, applying the established-outsiders model to changing power balances between classes, ethnic groups, colonized and colonizers, men and women, parents and children, gays and straights. A further theoretical development in the last year of his life is an essay inspired by Harper Lee's To Kill a Mocking Bird, published here in English for the first time.
Abstract:
Estates of the English Crown, 1558-1640, The
Comments: print

xviii, 440 p. ; 24 cm.

edited by R.W. Hoyle.

Includes bibliographical references and index.

Abstract:
Estigma
Comments: 4.4"x7.6"x0.5"; 0.3 lb; 176 pages

Abstract:
Ethnography of Reading, The
Comments: print

vi, 285 p. : ill. ; 24 cm.

edited by Jonathan Boyarin.

Includes bibliographical references and index.

Abstract:
European Peasant Family and Society, The
Comments: x, 256 p. : ill., maps ; 25 cm.

Includes bibliographical references and index.
Abstract:
European Political Thought, 1600-1700
Comments: xiii, 208 p. ; 22 cm.

Includes bibliographical references (p. 182-201) and index.
Abstract:
European Women and Preindustrial Craft
Comments: Examines key 18th and 19th-century industries, including spinning, weaving, calico painting, and the lingerie trade. This volume shows how women adopted or rejected new technology in various situations, helping maintain social peace during profound economic dislocation.
Abstract:
European Women and Preindustrial Craft
Comments: Examines key 18th and 19th-century industries, including spinning, weaving, calico painting, and the lingerie trade. This volume shows how women adopted or rejected new technology in various situations, helping maintain social peace during profound economic dislocation.
Abstract:
Everyday Life
Comments: In the last twenty years the concept of the quotidien , or the everyday, has been prominent in contemporary French culture and in British and American cultural studies. This book provides the first comprehensive analytical survey of the whole field of approaches to the everyday. It offers, firstly, a historical perspective, demonstrating the importance of mainstream and dissident Surrealism; the indispensable contribution, over a 20-year period (1960-80), of four major figures: Henri Lefebvre, Roland Barthes, Michel de Certeau, and Georges Perec; and the recent proliferation of works that investigate everyday experience. Secondly, it establishes the framework of philosophical ideas on which discourses on the everyday depend, but which they characteristically subvert. Thirdly, it comprises searching analyses of works in a variety of genres, including fiction, the essay, poetry, theatre, film, photography, and the visual arts, consistently stressing how explorations of the everyday tend to question and combine genres in richly creative ways.

By demonstrating the enduring contribution of Perec and others, and exploring the Surrealist inheritance, the book proposes a genealogy for the remarkable upsurge of interest in the everyday since the 1980s. A second main objective is to raise questions about the dimension of experience addressed by artists and thinkers when they invoke the quotidien or related concepts. Does the 'everyday' refer to an objective content defined by particular activities, or is it best thought of in terms of rhythm, repetition, festivity, ordinariness, the generic, the obvious, the given? Are there events or acts that are uniquely 'everyday', or is the quotidien a way of thinking about events and acts in the 'here and now' as opposed to the longer term? What techniques or genres are best suited to conveying the nature of everyday life? The book explores these questions in a comparative spirit, drawing new parallels between the work of numerous writers and artists, including André Breton, Raymond Queneau, Walter Benjamin, Michel Leiris, Maurice Blanchot, Michel Foucault, Stanley Cavell, Annie Ernaux, Jacques Réda, and Sophie Calle.
Abstract:
Exeter, 1540-1640
Comments: 315 p. : maps ; 21 cm.

Abstract:
Existentialism
Comments: [6], 145 p. 21 cm.

Bibliography: p. [141]-143.
Abstract:
Experience of Authority in Early Modern England, The
Comments: vii, 331 p. ; 22 cm.

Abstract:
Facts of Life, The
Comments: This book traces the development of sexual knowledge and guidance in Britain over three centuries. It investigates how views on sexual activities, sexual disorders, sexual pleasures, and sexual proprieties evolved through the years. Roy Porter and Lesley Hall explore the moral, religious, scientific, medical, domestic, social, and cultural backgrounds of various periods in which sexual information was received. They assess, for example, the impact of literature on sex on the legal regulation of prostitution, the control of contagious diseases, gender relations in and out of marriage, social purity movements, and social hygiene concerns. They describe the emergence of evolutionist and laboratory discourses on sexuality, the origins of sexual surveys, debates about marriage and free love, and associated revelations of personal sexual experiences. Examining texts that range from Nicolas Venette's Mysteries of Conjugal Love Reveal'd, written near the close of the seventeenth century, to Marie Stopes's Married Love, a famous tract of the twentieth century, Porter and Hall show how these texts established and authorized sexual knowledge and sexual practices. They describe the authors of these texts, their careers, and the motives for involvement in medico-moral campaigns that were often thought unsavory and commonly led to criticism and censure. Challenging and overturning common assumptions and historiographical traditions - from hoary myths of the Victorians to the work of Michel Foucault - the book adds a great deal to our understanding of the origins of sexual mores and knowledge.
Abstract:
Fama
Comments: In medieval Europe, the word fama denoted both talk (what was commonly said about a person or event) and an individual's ensuing reputation (one's fama). Although talk by others was no doubt often feared, it was also valued and even cultivated as a vehicle for shaping one's status. People had to think about how to "manage" their fama, which played an essential role in the medieval culture of appearances.At the same time, however, institutions such as law courts and the church, alarmed by the power of talk, sought increasingly to regulate it. Christian moral discourse, literary and visual representation, juristic manuals, and court records reflected concern about talk. This book's authors consider how talk was created and entered into memory. They address such topics as fama's relation to secular law and the preoccupations of the church, its impact on women's lives, and its capacity to shape the concept of literary authorship.
Abstract:
Families in Former Times
Comments: xi, 265 p. : ill. ; 24 cm.

Translation of Familles. Includes bibliographical references and index.
Abstract:
Family Demography
Comments: With the radical transformation of family structure in most Western nations and its important social and economic implications, studies in family demographics have increased dramatically in recent years. The second volume in a new series undertaken in conjunction with the International Union for the Scientific Study of Population, this collection documents recent methodological developments in the demographic analysis of families, households, and kin groups, including the analysis of the family life cycle and the construction of multistate life tables and simulation models. The volume also addresses the projection of the number and composition of families and households, a topic of great practical importance, and it proposes a number of refinements and alternatives to the simple conventional approaches now taken.
Abstract:
Family Story, The
Comments: This book sets out to retell the history of the English family between 1830 and 1960. Written collaboratively, it draws on the primary research of each author to shed light on those areas so often ignored in general social histories and histories of the family in particular. While acknowledging their importance, it sets to one side the usual focus on marriage and motherhood. Instead a range of other relationships, some familial, others contractual, are set in a more general historical context, alongside an exploration of how expectations and beliefs about the family operated in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. This approach challenges existing models to reveal the complex and shifting meanings of family life in our recent past.
Abstract:
Family Structure in Nineteenth Century Lancashire
Comments: ix, 230 p. 24 cm.

Bibliography: p. 181-194.
Abstract:
Family and Family Relationships, 1500-1900, The
Comments: print

xix, 344 p. ; 23 cm.

Rosemary O'Day.

Includes bibliographical references (p. 308-328) and index.

Abstract:
Family and Industrial Society, The
Comments: print

xi, 260 p. : ill. ; 22 cm.

C.C. Harris.

Includes indexes.

Bibliography: p. [248]-255.

Abstract:
Family and Inheritance
Comments: vi, 421 p. : maps, charts ; 23 cm.

Includes bibliographical references and index. Inheritance, property and women / Jack Goody -- Family structures and inheritance customs in sixteenth-century France / Emmanuel Le Roy Ladurie -- Inheritance, land tenure and peasant family structure / Lutz K. Berkner -- Aspects of kinship behaviour and property in rural Western Europe before 1800 / David Sabean -- Peasant inheritance customs in the Midlands, 1280-1700 / Cicely Howell -- Peasant inheritance customs and land distribution in Cambridgeshire from the sixteenth to the eighteenth centuries / Margaret Spufford -- The European debate on customs of inheritance, 1500-1700 / Joan Thirsk -- Patterns of inheritance and settlement by great landowners from the fifteenth to the eighteenth centuries / J.P. Cooper -- The grid of inheritance / E.P. Thompson -- Private property in history / V.G. Kiernan.
Abstract:
Family and Kinship in England 1450-1800
Comments: vi, 155 p. : ill. ; 24 cm.

Includes bibliographical references and index.
Abstract:
Family and Kinship in England 1450-1800
Comments: vi, 155 p. : ill. ; 24 cm.

Includes bibliographical references and index.
Abstract:
Family in the Western World from the Black Death to the Industrial Age, The
Comments: print

x, 309 p. : ill. ; 25 cm.

Beatrice Gottlieb.

Includes bibliographical references (p. 285-294) and index.

Abstract:
Famine, Disease and the Social Order in Early Modern Society
Comments: Although Western societies cannot escape from images of famine in the present world, their direct experience with widespread hunger has receded into the past. England was one of the very first countries to escape from the shadow of famine and in this volume, a team of distinguished economic, social, and demographic historians analyze why. The contributors combine detailed local studies of individual communities, broader analyses of the impact of hunger and disease, and methodological discussions that explore the effect of crisis mortality on early modern societies. The essays examine the complex interrelationships among past demographic, social, and economic structures, and demonstrate that the impact of hunger and disease can provide a unique vehicle for an exploration of early modern society.
Abstract:
Fate of "culture", The
Comments: Clifford Geertz is one of the foremost figures in the reconfiguration of the boundary between the social sciences and the humanities in the second half of the twentieth century. Expanding the power and complexity of the anthropological concept of culture, his work is both foundational to, and in critical counterpoint with, that vast interdisciplinary spectrum of scholarship known today as "cultural studies." This book brings together seven leading scholars from four disciplines to take a fresh look at Geertz's work, and to consider the continuing implications of his work in the contemporary context.

Framed by an important introduction by anthropologist Sherry B. Ortner, the articles cover such topics as seventeenth-century English ghosts, Jewish merchants in early capitalism, Egyptian women in the age of television, and the role of Sherpas in Himalayan mountaineering, as well as such methodological issues as the place of emotional empathy and "complicity" in ethnographic fieldwork, and the mutual illumination of culture and history.
Abstract:
Feast
Comments: xiii, 364 p. : ill., maps ; 24 cm.

Includes bibliographical references (p. 304-342) and index.
Abstract:
Feminine Sentences
Comments: This new book integrates material drawn from a variety of sources - feminist theory, cultural and literary analysis, sociology and art history - in an original discussion of women's relationship to modern and post-modern culture.
The essays in the book challenge the continuing separation of sociological from textual analysis in cultural (and feminist) theory and enquiry. They address critically the question of women's writing, exploring the idea that women may begin to define their own lives and construct their identities in a patriarchal culture through the very process of writing. They also present a cogent defence of a feminist cultural politics, including a politics of the body.
Abstract:
Feminism
Comments: 106 p. ; 23 cm.

Includes bibliographical references and index.
Abstract:
Feminism and History
Comments: The question of difference - between women and men and among women - is at the heart of feminist theory and the history of feminism. Feminists have long debated the meanings of sexual difference: is it an underlying truth of nature or the result of changing social belief? Are women the same as or different from men? Feminism and History argues that sexual difference, indeed that all forms of social differentation, cannot be understood apart from history. It brings together the best critical articles available to analyze the ways in which differences among women and men have been produced. The articles range across many countries and time periods (from the Middle Ages to the present) and they include analyses of western and non-western experiences. There are discussions of race in the United States and in colonial contexts. A variety of theoretical approaches to the question of difference is included; but in all cases, difference is the focus of the historian's analysis.The analytic focus on difference distinguishes this book from other collections of women's history. It will be fascinating and essential reading for students and teachers of history, women's studies, genedr studies, cultural studies, queer theory, and feminist theory.
Abstract:
Feminism, the Public and the Private
Comments: x, 507 p. ; 23 cm.

Library also owns the netLibrary eBook version of this title. Includes bibliographical references and index.
Abstract:
Feminist Thought
Comments: xiv, 305 p. : ill ; 23 cm.

Bibliography: p. 271-291.
Abstract:
Festive Drama
Comments: print

viii, 286 p. : ill. ; 24 cm.

edited by Meg Twycross.

Includes bibliographical references.

Abstract:
Fifty Key Contemporary Thinkers
Comments: This revised second edition from our bestselling Key Guides includes brand new entries on some of the most influential thinkers of the twentieth- and twenty-first century: Zizek, Bergson, Husserl, Heidegger, Butler and Haraway.

With a new introduction by the author, sections on phenomenology and the post-human, full cross-referencing and up-to-date guides to major primary and secondary texts, this is an essential resource to contemporary critical thought for undergraduates and the interested reader.

Abstract:
Financialization Of Daily Life
Comments: While trillions of dollars came and went in the stock market boom of the 1990s, the image of "every man and woman a CEO" may turn out to be the era's lasting legacy. Business news, once reserved to specialized papers or sections of the larger news of the day, came to the forefront in cable television and in cultural images of how ordinary people, through the internet and other avenues could not only master their financial life, but move money and equity around with the ease of a financial titan. Financialization of Daily Life looks at how this transformation occurred, and how it is just now becoming a significant, and troubling, aspect of our political and cultural life.Randy Martin takes us through all of the aspects of our "financialization." He examines how the shift in economic life arose not only from changes in culture, but also from new policy priorities that emphasize controlling inflation over promoting growth. He offers a close reading of self-help literature that teaches parents how to rear financially literate children and to instruct adults in the fundamentals of fiscal management. He examines just what a society that treats financial investment as a national past time really looks like, and how that society is transforming the world.In a country rocked by scandals in accounting and banking, the identification ordinary citizens make with, and the risk with which they engage in, the stock market calls into question the very basis of our economic system. Randy Martin spells out in clear terms the implications our financial doings—and undoing—have for the way we organize our lives, and, especially, our money.
Abstract:
Food and Culture
Comments: print

xiv, 631 p. : ill. ; 26 cm.

edited by Carole Counihan and Penny Van Esterik.

Includes bibliographical references and index.

Abstract:
Food, Drink and Identity
Comments: Food and drink have provided fascinating insights into cultural patterns in consumer societies. There is an intimate relationship between food and identity but processes of identity formation through food are far from clear. This book adds a new perspective to the existing body of scholarship by addressing pivotal questions: is food central or marginal to identity construction? Does food equally matter for all group(ing)s? Why would, in people's experience, food become especially important at one moment, or, on the contrary, lose its significance? The origin of food habits is also interrogated. Contributors investigate how, when, why and by whom cooking, eating and drinking were used as a means of distinction. Leading historians and sociologists look at concepts of authenticity, adjustment, invention and import, as well as food signs and codes, and why they have been accepted or rejected. They examine a wide range of periods and topics: the elderly, alcohol and identity in Early Modern Europe; food riots and national identity; noble families, eating and drinking in eighteenth-century Spain; consumption and the working class in the nineteenth century; commensality; the meaning of Champagne in Belle-Epoque France; the narrative of food in Norway; wine and bread in French Algeria; food and identity in post-war Germany. This intriguing book brings together new, comparative insights and research that allow a better understanding of processes of integration and segregation, the role of food in the construction of identity, and the relationship between old and new food habits.
Abstract:
Food, Energy and the Creation of Industriousness
Comments: Until the widespread harnessing of machine energy, food was the energy which fuelled the economy. In this groundbreaking 2011 study of agricultural labourers' diet and material standard of living, Craig Muldrew uses empirical research to present a much fuller account of the interrelationship between consumption, living standards and work in the early modern English economy than has previously existed. The book integrates labourers into a study of the wider economy and engages with the history of food as an energy source and its importance to working life, the social complexity of family earnings, and the concept of the 'industrious revolution'. It argues that 'industriousness' was as much the result of ideology and labour markets as labourers' household consumption. Linking this with ideas about the social order of early modern England, the author demonstrates that bread, beer and meat were the petrol of this world, and a springboard for economic change.
Abstract:
Food, Morals, and Meaning
Comments: print

p. ; cm.

John Coveney.

Includes bibliographical references and index.

Abstract:
For Better, for Worse
Comments: Did you know that...The "contemporary" fashion of living together before marriage is far from new, and was frequently practiced in earlier days...Self-divorce, although never legal, was once a commonplace occurrence...Marriage is more popular today than in the Victorian era...Marriage in church was not compulsory in England and Wales until the mid-18th century. These are just a few of the fascinating, and often surprising, revelations in For Better, For Worse, the most comprehensive treatment to date of the history of marriage in a major Western society. Using fresh evidence from popular courtship and wedding rituals over four centuries, Gillis challenges the widely held belief that marriage has evolved from a cold, impersonal arrangement to a more affectionate, egalitarian form of companionship. The truth, argues Gillis, lies somewhere in between: conjugal love was never wholly absent in preindustrial times, while today's marriages are less companionate than is commonly believed. Gillis also illustrates, in rich detail, the perpetual tension between marital ideals and actual practices. This social history of the behavior and emotions of ordinary men and women radically revises our perspective on love and marriage in the past--and the present.
Abstract:
Forgiveness and Revenge
Comments: x, 205 p. ; 24 cm.

Includes bibliographical references (p. [193]-199) and index.
Abstract:
Forgotten Children
Comments: print

xi, 334 p. ; 24 cm.

Linda A. Pollock.

Revision of thesis (doctoral)--University of St. Andrews, 1981.

Bibliography: p. 296-334.

Abstract:
From Reformation to Improvement
Comments: vi, 179 p. ; 24 cm.

"The Ford lectures delivered in the University of Oxford, 1994-1995." Includes bibliographical references and index.
Abstract:
GENDER TROUBLE
Comments:

Abstract:
Gayatri Chakravorty Spivak
Comments: Gayatri Chakravorty Spivak offers an overtly political challenge to the way we think about literature and culture. As she highlights the many legacies of colonialism, she re-defines the ethical horizons of contemporary critical thought. This volume focuses on her key theoretical concepts, intellectual context and critical reception, providing an accessible introduction to one of the most important thinkers of our time.
Stephen Morton introduces Spivak's crucial work through an analysis of such issues as:
* methodology and Spivak's 'difficult' style
* deconstructive strategies
* third world women, the concept of the 'subaltern' and the critique of western feminism
* re-reading Marx for the global capitalist era
* Spivak's contribution to colonial discourse studies and postcolonial theory.
Having examined the ways in which Spivak has transformed contemporary cultural theory, and in particular feminist and postcolonial thought, Morton concludes with a guide to reading Spivak's work and that of her critics. Essential for students of literature or cultural studies, this volume is the ideal companion for a first encounter with Spivak's remarkable texts.
Abstract:
Gender and History in Western Europe
Comments: Using gender as a tool of historical analysis has been immensely liberating, both addressing some of the theoretical issues raised by women's history and opening up the history of masculinity as a new area of enquiry. This volume provides a clear and accessible guide to the evolution and use of gender as a concept in historical studies. It presents some of the most influential contributions in the field, outlining in the process key issues of historical controversy: the feminine and masculine domains in history; anatomical conceptions of sexual difference; the development of domestic ideology; seventeeth-century female prophets and the nineteenth-century Marian revival; the role of women in formal and informal political behaviour and discourse, and the role of gender in conflict in periodic realignments of the sexual division of labour. The work represented offers new understandings of the history of women as well as a new way of thinking about the history of men. But these insights cannot be confined: areas of history as disparate as science, religion, and politics are all affected by the 'gender revolution'. The aim of books in the Arnold Readers in History series is to bring together selections of important, formative or controversial essays and writings. Each book will make available in a single accessible volume examples of the writings of many key figures in the field, along with essays that in one way or another are (or seem destined to become) historiographical benchmarks.
Abstract:
Gender and Power in Britain
Comments:

Abstract:
Gender and Space in Early Modern England
Comments: print

viii, 208 p. ; 24 cm.

Amanda Flather.

Includes bibliographical references (p. 179-196) and index.

Abstract:
Gender in English Society 1650-1850
Comments: A lively social history of the roles of men and women - from workplace to household, from parish church to alehouse, from market square to marriage bed. Robert Shoemaker investigates such varied topics as crime, leisure, the theatre, religious observance, notions of morality and even changing patterns of sexual activity itself.
Abstract:
Gender, Sex, and Subordination in England 1500-1800
Comments: xxii, 442 p., [24] p. of plates : ill. ; 24 cm.

Includes bibliographical references (p. 414-433) and index.
Abstract:
Genders
Comments: xxxiv, 177 p. ; 20 cm.

Includes bibliographical references and index.
Abstract:
Gentry in England and Wales, 1500-1700, The
Comments: "This book sets out to study the behaviour and influence of one of the most important social groups in early modern England and Wales: the gentry. Although their power and wealth has been the subject of lively historiographical debate for the last fifty years there has been no sustained attempt to integrate and evaluate the available evidence on this section of the elite. Lawrence Stone's magisterial The Crisis of the Aristocracy, 1558-1641 (published in 1965) offered a full analysis of the titled nobility of those non-nobles most closely tied to the aristocracy by blood and wealth. The present book moves further down the social scale, considering those whom contemporaries sometimes called the 'lesser nobility', the landed classes without claim to title, and those below them who struggled to establish a right to be called 'gentlemen'." "It is possible to attempt some quantitative analysis of the size of the gentry group, and even of its aggregate wealth and landholding - issues to which the 'rise of the gentry' debate accorded much attention. But the present volume adopts instead an ethnographic approach in order to understand what it was to be a 'gentleman' in early modern England; what contemporaries believed to be the essence of gentility; and what mode of life had to be adopted in order to justify claims to status and power. Wealth and political influence are given full attention, but so are attitudes to family and lineage, to education, learning and social behaviour, and also, since the period 1500-1700 was one of religious upheaval, to belief and relations with the church. Case studies and artefacts are used as essential 'texts' to explicate social values and action."--BOOK JACKET.Title Summary field provided by Blackwell North America, Inc. All Rights Reserved
Abstract:
Geographical Interpretations of Historical Sources
Comments: 458p : ill, maps ; 23cm.

Abstract:
Geographies of Exclusion
Comments: xviii, 206 p. : ill. ; 24 cm.

Includes bibliographical references (p. [187]-196) and index.
Abstract:
Georges Bataille
Comments: Long recognized in France as a central figure in French cultural thought, the range and significance of Batille's ideas are now being grasped in the English speaking world. His influence on Derrida, Foucault, Kristeva and Baudrillard is now more clearly understood and Bataille has emerged as a front-rank cultural theorist who posed questions and paradoxes that were extraordinarily prescient.

This book offers a comprehensive and detailed presentation and analysis of the full range of his writings - political, philosophical, aesthetic, literary, anthropological and cultural. And tackles his thoughts on waste, sacrifice, death, eroticism, surplus, ecstasy and drunkenness, offering the best available guide to this challenging a

Abstract:
Giddens Reader, The
Comments: print

viii, 356 p. : ill. ; 22 cm.

edited by Philip Cassell.

Includes bibliographical references (p. 343-345) and index.

Abstract:
Gift, The
Comments: Discusses the argument that a work of art is essentially a gift and not a commodity.


From the Trade Paperback edition.
Abstract:
Global Crisis
Comments: DIV

Revolutions, droughts, famines, invasions, wars, regicides, government collapses—the calamities of the mid-seventeenth century were unprecedented in both frequency and extent. The effects of what historians call the "General Crisis" extended from England to Japan, from the Russian Empire to sub-Saharan Africa. The Americas, too, did not escape the turbulence of the time.

In this meticulously researched volume, master historian Geoffrey Parker presents the firsthand testimony of men and women who saw and suffered from the sequence of political, economic, and social crises between 1618 to the late 1680s. Parker also deploys the scientific evidence of climate change during this period. His discoveries revise entirely our understanding of the General Crisis: changes in prevailing weather patterns, especially longer winters and cooler and wetter summers, disrupted growing seasons and destroyed harvests. This in turn brought hunger, malnutrition, and disease; and as material conditions worsened, wars, rebellions, and revolutions rocked the world.

Parker's demonstration of the link between climate change, war, and catastrophe 350 years ago stands as an extraordinary historical achievement. And the implications of his study are equally important: are we adequately prepared—or even preparing—for the catastrophes that climate change brings?

/div
Abstract:
God Speed the Plough
Comments: print

xv, 335 p. : ill., maps ; 23 cm.

Andrew McRae.

Includes bibliographical references (p. 300-318) and index.

Abstract:
God's Fury, England's Fire
Comments: print

xxvi, 757 p. : ill., maps ; 24 cm.

Michael Braddick.

Includes bibliographical references (p. 603-723).

Abstract:
Godliness and Governance in Tudor Colchester
Comments: print

xiii, 434 p. : 1 map ; 24 cm.

Laquita M. Higgs.

Includes bibliographical references (p. 407-422) and index.

Abstract:
Governing The Tongue : The Politics of Speech in Early New England
Comments: Colonial New Englanders would have found our modern notions of free speech very strange indeed. Children today shrug off harsh words by chanting "sticks and stones may break my bones but names will never hurt me," but in the seventeenth century people felt differently. "A soft tongue breaketh the bone," they often said. Governing the Tongue explains why the spoken word assumed such importance in the culture of early New England. Author Jane Kamensky re-examines such famous Puritan events as the Salem witch trials and the banishment of Anne Hutchinson to expose the ever-present fear of what the puritans called "sins of the tongue." But even while dangerous or deviant speech was restricted, Kamensky points out, godly speech was continuously praised and promoted. Congregations were told that one should ones voice "like a trumpet" to God and "cry out and cease not." By placing speech at the heart of familiar stories of Puritan New England, Kamensky develops new ideas about the relationship between speech and power both in Puritan New England and, by extension, in our world today.
Abstract:
Government and Community in the English Provinces, 1700-1870
Comments: print

x, 205 p. ; 23 cm.

David Eastwood.

Includes bibliographical references (p. 171-196) and index.

Abstract:
Great British Bobby, The
Comments: 5.0"x7.7"x1.1"; 0.5 lb; 336 pages

The Victorians called him "Bobby" after Sir Robert Peel, the Home Secretary who created the Metropolitan Police in 1829. The generations that followed came to regard the force in which he served as "the best police in the world." If 21st- century observers sometimes take a more jaundiced view of his efforts, the blue-helmeted, unarmed policeman remains an icon of Britishness, and a symbol of the relatively peaceful nature of our social evolution. In The Great British Bobby, Clive Emsley traces the development of Britain's forces of law and order from the earliest watchmen and constables of the pre-modern period to the police service of today.
Abstract:
Great Wave, The
Comments: xvi, 536 p. : ill., maps ; 25 cm.

Includes bibliographical references (p. 363-501) and index.
Abstract:
Grief and Gender, 700-1700
Comments: print

xii, 310 p. : ill. ; 22 cm.

edited by Jennifer C. Vaught with Lynne Dickson Bruckner.

Includes bibliographical references and index.

Abstract:
Growing up and Growing Old
Comments: print

[8 p.], 200 p. : ill. ; 22 cm.

Jenny Hockey and Allison James.

Includes bibliographical references (p. [185]-195) and index.

Abstract:
Growth and Decline in Colchester, 1300-1525
Comments: xvi, 304 p. ; 24 cm.

Includes index. Bibliography: p. 283-292.
Abstract:
Growth of the Medieval City, The
Comments: xviii, 413 p. : maps, plans ; 23 cm.

Includes bibliographical references (p. 339-373) and index.
Abstract:
Habermas and the Public Sphere
Comments: 498p.

Abstract:
Heirs, Kin, and Creditors in Renaissance Florence
Comments: This study, based on Florentine repudiations of inheritance, reveals that inheritance was not simply an automatic process where the recipients were passive, if grateful. In influential European societies of the past, it was in fact a process that continued long after the deceased's death. Heirs also had options: at the least, to reject a burdensome patrimony, but also to manoeuvre property to others and to avoid (at times deceptively, if not fraudulently) the claims of others to portions of the estate. Repudiation was a vestige of Roman law that once again became a viable legal institution with the revival of Roman law in the Middle Ages. Florentines incorporated repudiation into their strategies of adjustment after death, showing that they were not merely passive recipients of what came their way. Further, these strategies fostered family goals, including continuity across the generations.
Abstract:
Heritage, Place and Community
Comments: This work explores the turn to heritage in recent urban, economic development and discusses the conditions which influence the adoption of heritage projects in local areas, with particular reference to Wales.
Abstract:
Hermeneutics and the Human Sciences
Comments: print

viii, 314 p. ; 24 cm.

Paul Ricoeur ; edited, translated, and introduced by John B. Thompson.

Includes index.

Bibliography: p. 306-308.

Abstract:
Hidden Consumer, The
Comments: ix,278 p. : ill. ; 24 cm.

Includes bibliographical references and index.
Abstract:
Historical Demography
Comments:
Abstract:
Historicism
Comments:

Historicism is the essential introduction to the field, providing its readers with the necessary knowledge, background and vocabulary to apply it in their own studies. Paul Hamilton's compact and comprehensive guide:

* explains the theory and basics of historicism
* presents a history of the term and its uses
* introduces the reader to the key thinkers in the field, from ancient Greece to modern times
* considers historicism in contemporary debates and its relevance to other modes of criticism, such as feminism and post-colonialism
* contains an extensive bibliography of further reading.

Abstract:
Histories: French Constructions of the Past
Comments: 6.5"x10.0"x2.2"; 2.5 lb; 654 pages

The period from 1945 to the present has been one of the most intellectually fruitful in French history. Entirely new approaches to a number of fields have been developed, and the influence of French thinkers has resonated throughout the West, in many ways reformulating our approach to modern knowledge. This 654-page volume traces developments in French historiography from questions of social history and global history (1945-1960s), structuralism (mid-1960s through mid-1970s), the territory of the historian (1970s through mid-1980s), to criticisms and reformulations (1980s to the present). Featuring work by Franois Furet, Michel de Certeau, Michelle Perrot, Pierre Nora, Roger Chartier, Ernest Labrousse, Fernand Braudel, Claude Lvi-Strauss, Michel Foucault, Jacques Le Goff, Pierre Bourdieu, and others, this volume illuminates the most important controversies about historical method in the twentieth century.
Abstract:
History and Class
Comments: x, 318 p. ; 24 cm.

Includes index. Bibliography: p. [308]-312.
Abstract:
History and Cultural Theory
Comments:

In recent times there has been recognition of the growing influence of cultural theory on historical writing. Foucault, Bourdieu, Butler and Spivak are just some of the thinkers whose ideas have been taken up and deployed by historians.

What are these ideas and where do they come from? How have cultural theorists thought about 'history'? And how have historians applied theoretical insights to enhance their own understanding of events in the past?

This book provides a wide-ranging and authoritative guide to the often vexed and controversial relationship between history and contemporary theory. It analyses the concepts that concern both theorists and historians, such as power, identity, modernity and postcolonialism, and offers a critical evaluation of them from an historical standpoint.

Written in an accessible manner, History and Cultural Theory gives historians and students an invaluable summary of the impact of cultural theory on historiography over the last twenty years, and indicates the likely directions of the subject in the future.

Abstract:
History and Memory
Comments: vi, 263 p. ; 23 cm.

Includes bibliographical references and index.
Abstract:
History and Narrative Reader, The
Comments:

Drawing together seminal texts from philosophers and historians, including Hayden White, David Carr and Frederick Olafson, this volume presents the great debate over the narrative character of history from the 1960s onwards.

The History and Narrative Reader combines theory with practice to offer a unique overview of this debate and illuminates the practical implications of these philosophical debates for the writing of history.

The editor's introduction offers a succinct survey of the subject to support readings which explore the role of narrative in:

  • historical understanding
  • human action
  • linguistics and structure
  • the practice of history.

An excellent book that any student of history and its practice will want on their bookshelf.

Abstract:
History of Old Age
Comments: This book is the first major study of the ways in which old age was perceived in Western culture and society. Beginning from ancient Palestine and Classical Greece, Minois traces the changing conceptions of the nature, value and burden of the old.

He shows how, in ancient Greece, the cult of youth and beauty, on the one hand, and the reverence for the figure of the Homeric sage, on the other, created an ambivalent attitude towards the aged. This ambiquity appears again in the contrast between the active role that senior citizens played in Roman politics, and their depiction in satirical literature of the period. Christian literature in the Middle Ages also played a large part in defining the society′s perception of the old, both in the image of the revered holy sage and in the total condemnation of the aged sinner.

Minois traces the increasingly positive image of old age in various professions from the eleventh to the sixteenth centuries. He shows how, as medical advances lengthened the average life–span, more and more old people were seen to take an active part in the life of the society. Throughout, Minois considers the interrelation of literary, religious, medical and political factors in the social fate of old men and women and their relationship with the rest of society.
Abstract:
History of Suicide
Comments: In his illuminating history, Georges Minois examines how a culture's attitudes about suicide reflect its larger beliefs and values - perspectives on life and death, duty and honor, pain and pleasure. Minois addresses a wide range of questions drawn from theology, law, literature, science, and medicine. Under what circumstances has suicide been honored or condemned? On what grounds, if any, can it be justified? Under what conditions do suicides increase or decrease? Does legislation make any difference? Does religion? How does the historical record disclose or obscure suicides? Minois concludes with comments on the most recent turn in this long and complex history - the emotional debate over euthanasia, assisted suicide, and the right to die.
Abstract:
History of the Family, The
Comments: print

xiii, 202 p. ; 22 cm.

James Casey.

Includes index.

Bibliography: p. [181]-192.

Abstract:
Holy Household, The
Comments: This is a fascinating study of the impact of the Reformation idea of "civic righteousness" on the position of women in Augsburg. Roper argues that its development, both as a religious credo and as a social movement, must be understood in terms of gender. Until now the effects of the Reformation on women have been viewed as largely beneficial--Protestantism being linked with the forces of progressivism, individualism, and modernization. Roper here argues that such a view of the Reformation's legacy is a profound misreading, and that the status of women was, in fact, worsened by the Reformation. A number of themes are explored: the economic position of women in the household economy; the nature of "civic righteousness" and how it applied a "reform moralism" to the role of marriage and the household; the efforts of civic authority to reform sexual deviance; the attempts to control marriage and the breakdown of marriage; and the role of convents and nuns. The Holy Household is the first scholarly account of how the Reformation affected half of society. It combines sound application of feminist theory with careful, open-ended archival research to advance our understanding of the Reformation, of feminist history, and of the place of women in modern European society.
Abstract:
Home Divisions
Comments: print

xvi, 336 p. : ill., map ; 25 cm.

Thomas Cogswell.

Includes bibliographical references (p. 320-327) and index.

Abstract:
Horse Trade of Tudor and Stuart England, The
Comments: xii, 205 p. : ill. ; 23 cm.

Includes index. Bibliography: p. 175-190.
Abstract:
Hospitable Performances
Comments: xi, 220 p. ; 24 cm.

Includes bibliographical references (p. 199-215) and index.
Abstract:
Household Politics
Comments: print

xiv, 209 pages ; 25 cm

Don Herzog.

Includes bibliographical references and index.

Abstract:
Household Servants in Early Modern England
Comments: This lively socio-cultural history examines household service, one of the largest, multi-layered, mobile and most indispensable sectors of employment in early modern England. Drawing on a wide variety of cultural sources including literary depiction and self-representation, this study brings into sharp focus individual life stories of Britain’s servant class.  Exploring the relationships between servants and between employers and servants; it depicts the differences between patterns of employment in London and the provinces, and the juxtaposition of servant vulnerability and servant power. This book places new importance on the household servant as a major agent in cultural change and makes a significant contribution to our understanding of servitude in London and the provinces in the two centuries following the Reformation.
Abstract:
Household Strategies for Survival, 1600-2000
Comments: 196 p. : ill. ; 23 cm.

Includes bibliographical references.
Abstract:
Household and Family in Past Time
Comments: print

xii, 623 p. illus., maps. 24 cm.

Edited, with an analytic introduction on the history of the family, by Peter Laslett with the assistance of Richard Wall.

Bibliography: p. [590]-609.

Abstract:
Household and Farm Inventories in Oxfordshire 1550-1590
Comments: 374 pages

Abstract:
Housing Culture
Comments: print

xiv, 220 p. : ill. ; 25 cm.

Matthew Johnson.

Includes bibliographical references (p. 195-205) and index.

Abstract:
How Much Is Enough?
Comments: 5.5"x8.6"x1.1"; 0.9 lb; 256 pages

Abstract:
How Societies Remember
Comments: In treating memory as a cultural rather than an individual faculty, this book provides an account of how bodily practices are transmitted in, and as, traditions. Most studies of memory as a cultural faculty focus on written, or inscribed transmissions of memories. Paul Connerton, on the other hand, concentrates on bodily (or incorporated) practices, and so questions the currently dominant idea that literary texts may be taken as a metaphor for social practices generally. The author argues that images of the past and recollected knowledge of the past are conveyed and sustained by ritual performances and that performative memory is bodily. Bodily social memory is an essential aspect of social memory, but it is an aspect which has until now been badly neglected. An innovative study, this work should be of interest to researchers into social, political and anthropological thought as well as to graduate and undergraduate students.
Abstract:
Hubbub
Comments: xiv, 335 p. : ill., maps ; 24 cm.

Includes bibliographical references (p. [251]-314) and index.
Abstract:
Humanism and Democratic Criticism
Comments: xvii, 154 p. ; 20 cm.

Includes bibliographical references and index.
Abstract:
Hunger in History
Comments: print

xi, 429 p. : ill. ; 24 cm.

general editor, Lucile F. Newman ; associate editors William Crossgrove ... [et al.].

Includes bibliographies and index.

Abstract:
Iconology
Comments: "[Mitchell] undertakes to explore the nature of images by comparing them with words, or, more precisely, by looking at them from the viewpoint of verbal language. . . . The most lucid exposition of the subject I have ever read."—Rudolf Arnheim, Times Literary Supplement
Abstract:
Idea of Justice, The
Comments: Social justice: an ideal, forever beyond our grasp; or one of many practical possibilities? More than a matter of intellectual discourse, the idea of justice plays a real role in how - and how well - people live. And in this book the distinguished scholar Amartya Sen offers a powerful critique of the theory of social justice that, in its grip on social and political thinking, has long left practical realities far behind.
Abstract:
Idea of Property in Seventeenth-Century England, The
Comments: vii, 184 p. ; 24 cm.

Includes bibliographical references (p. 166-180) and index.
Abstract:
Identifying the English
Comments: print

286 p. : ill. ; 24 cm.

Edward Higgs.

Includes bibliographical references (p. [251]-273) and index.

Abstract:
Identity
Comments: xiv, 386 p. : ill. ; 25 cm.

Includes bibliographical references and index.
Abstract:
Identity Through History
Comments: xv, 270 p. : ill. ; 24 cm.

Includes bibliographical references ( p. [257]-264) and index.
Abstract:
Identity and Agency in England, 1500-1800
Comments: print

xi, 254 p. : ill. ; 23 cm.

edited by Henry French & Jonathan Barry.

"Derives from papers given at a colloquium held at the University of Exeter in September 2002"--Pref.

Includes bibliographical references (p. 223-241) and index.

Abstract:
Identity of England
Comments: xii, 409 p., [16] p. of plates : ill., 1 map, ports. ; 25 cm.

Includes bibliographical references and index.
Abstract:
Ideology and Modern Culture
Comments: print

viii, 362 p. : ill. ; 24 cm.

John B. Thompson.

Includes bibliographical references (p. [332]-351) and index.

Abstract:
Ideology and Political Choice
Comments: &BAD:quot;A lively and illuminating examination and texturing of current ideologies on the American political landscape. Its gracfully written presentation will bring students to an understanding of the ideological impulses that shape our politics and help determine the country's current direction. I look forward to using it in my classes for its intelligence, its content, and its clarity.&BAD:quot;&BAD:mdash;Joel H. SilbeyCornell University
Abstract:
Illuminating Social Life
Comments: print

xiii, 418 p. : ill. ; 26 cm.

edited by Peter Kivisto.

Includes bibliographical references and index.

Abstract:
Imagined Communities
Comments:

Abstract:
Impact of English Towns, 1700-1800, The
Comments: vi, 206 p. : ill. ; 23 cm.

Includes index. Bibliography: p. [193]-198.
Abstract:
Impact of Plague in Tudor and Stuart England, The
Comments: print

xvi, 443 p. : ill. ; 22 cm.

Paul Slack.

Reprint. Originally published: London ; Boston : Routledge & K. Paul, 1985.

Includes bibliographical references (p. 344-425) and index.

Abstract:
Industry in the Countryside
Comments: xv, 257 p. : ill., maps ; 24 cm.

Includes bibliographical references (p. 247-254) and index.
Abstract:
Inequality and Poverty Re-Examined
Comments: The issues surrounding poverty and inequality continue to be of central concern to academics, politicians and policy makers but the ways in which we seek to study and understand them continue to change over time. This accessible new book seeks to provide a guide to some of the new approaches that have been developed in the light of international initiatives to reduce poverty and the notable changes in income inequality and poverty that have occurred across many western countries in recent years. These new approaches have to some degree been facilitated by the emergence of new techniques and a growing availability of data that enable cross national comparisons not only of income but also of measures of welfare such as educational achievement, nutritional status in developing countries and wealth and deprivation indicators in the developed world. Including specially commissioned research from a distinguished list of international authors, this volume makes a real contribution to the public debate surrounding inequality and poverty as well as providing new empirical information about them from around the world.
Abstract:
Informality
Comments: For most of the twentieth century, modernity has been characterised by the formalisation of social relations as face to face interactions are replaced by impersonal bureaucracy and finance. As we enter the new millennium, however, it becomes increasingly clear that it is only by stepping outside these formal structures that trust and co-operation can be created and social change achieved. In a brilliant theoretical tour de force, illustrated with sustained case studies of changing societies in the former eastern Europe and of changing forms of interaction within so-called virtual communities, Barbara Misztal, argues that only the society that achieves an appropriate balance between the informality and formality of interaction will find itself in a position to move forward to further democratisation and an improved quality of life.
Abstract:
Inhabiting the Landscape
Comments: vi, 181 p. ;

Includes bibliographical references and index.
Abstract:
Institutions of the Market, The
Comments: This book approaches markets as a dynamic ensemble of institutions; and as a set of rules or norms, that contribute to the evolution of social systems of governance, and can be analysed as a structured social system. It tackles such questions as: * Where do markets come from and what drives their evolution? * How do organizations cope with the competitive dynamism of markets? * What is the role of governance mechanisms in the institutional coordination of markets? Using this 'new institutionalist' approach, an international group of leading scholars examine the institutional foundations of economic change. Drawn from an array of disciplines, including Business, Organization Studies, Economics, and Sociology, the contributors address the organizational capabilities of firms, the social structuration of competition, and the diversity of governance mechanisms in the market. Contributors include: Nikolaus Beck, Christophe Boone, Robert Boyer, Alexander Ebner, Neil Fligstein, Henrich R. Greve, John Harriss, Bob Hinings, Geoffrey M. Hodgson, Bob Jessop, Alfred Kieser, Namrata Malhotra, Renate E. Meyer, Richard R. Nelson, Rudolf Richter, Peter Walgenbach, Filippo Carlo Wezel, Sidney G. Winter, and Arjen Van Witteloostuijn.
Abstract:
Interpersonal Communication
Comments: ix, 215 p.

Includes bibliographical references and index.
Abstract:
Interpretation of Cultures, The
Comments: ix, 470 p ; 24 cm.

Includes index
Abstract:
Intimations of Postmodernity
Comments: This thoughtful and illuminating book provides a major statement on the meaning and importance of postmodernity.
Abstract:
Introducing Bakhtin
Comments: The Russian critic and theorist Mikhail Bakhtin is once again in favor, his influence spreading across many discourses including literature, film, cultural and gender studies. This book provides the most comprehensive introduction to Bakhtin’s central concepts and terms. Sue Vice illustrates what is meant by such ideas as carnival, the grotesque body, dialogism and heteroglossia. These concepts are then placed in a contemporary context by drawing out the implications of Bakhtin’s writings, for current issues such as feminism and sexuality. Vice’s examples are always practically based on specific texts such as the film Thelma and Louise, Helen Zahavi’s Dirty Weekend and James Kelman's How late it was, how late.
Abstract:
Invention of Tradition, The
Comments: Many of the traditions which we think of as very ancient in their origins were not in fact sanctioned by long usage over the centuries, but were invented comparatively recently. This book explores examples of this process of invention - the creation of Welsh and Scottish 'national culture'; the elaboration of British royal rituals in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries; the origins of imperial rituals in British India and Africa; and the attempts by radical movements to develop counter-traditions of their own. It addresses the complex interaction of past and present, bringing together historians and anthropologists in a fascinating study of ritual and symbolism which poses new questions for the understanding of our history.
Abstract:
Jean Baudrillard
Comments: x, 118 p. ; 22 cm.

Includes bibliographical references (p. 109-113) and index.
Abstract:
Jonson and the Comic Truth
Comments: print

viii, 281 p. 25 cm.

Bibliographical references included in "Notes" (p. 257-273)

Abstract:
Justice
Comments: 5.1"x5.9"x0.6"; 0.3 lb

What are our obligations to others as people in a free society? Should government tax the rich to help the poor? Is the free market fair? Is it sometimes wrong to tell the truth? Is killing sometimes morally required? Is it possible, or desirable, to legislate morality? Do individual rights and the common good conflict?These questions are at the core of our public life today�and at the heart of Justice, in which Michael J. Sandel shows how a surer grasp of philosophy can help us to make sense of politics, morality, and our own convictions as well.Sandel�s legendary Justice course is one of the most popular and influential at Harvard. Up to a thousand students pack the campus theater to hear Sandel relate the big questions of political philosophy to the most vexing issues of the day. In the fall of 2009, PBS will air a series based on the course.Justice offers listeners the same exhilarating journey that captivates Harvard students�the challenge of thinking our way through the hard moral challenges we confront as citizens. It is a searching, lyrical exploration of the meaning of justice, an audiobook that invites readers of all political persuasions to consider familiar controversies in fresh and illuminating ways. Affirmative action, same-sex marriage, physician-assisted suicide, abortion, national service, the moral limits of markets, patriotism and dissent�Sandel shows how even the most hotly contested issues can be illuminated by reasoned moral argument.Justice is lively, thought-provoking, and wise�an essential new addition to the small shelf of books that speak convincingly to the big questions of our civic life.
Abstract:
Justice for Earthlings
Comments: In the past few decades social changes have impacted how we understand justice, as societies become both more multicultural and more interconnected globally. Much philosophical thought, however, seems to proceed in isolation from these developments. While philosophers from Plato onwards have portrayed justice as an abstract, universal ideal, Miller argues that principles of justice are always rooted in particular social contexts, and connects these ideas to the changing conditions of human life. In this important contribution to political philosophy, it is argued that philosophers need to pay more attention to the way that people actually think about what's fair, and only defend principles that are feasible to apply in the real world. To understand equality of opportunity, for example, we must explore the cultural constraints that people face when presented with life choices. Justice for Earthlings also explains how national boundaries make justice at global level different from social justice.
Abstract:
Justice for Hedgehogs
Comments: In Dworkin’s master work, the central thesis is that all areas of value depend on one another. This is one, big thing that the hedgehog knows, in contrast to the fox, who knows many little things. Dworkin’s understanding of the relationship—between ethics, morality, and political morality—is significantly revised and also greatly elaborated. He argues that “dignity” is the essential core of living well and that a satisfactory account of dignity would, in turn, point to two principles. The first states that it is objectively important that each person’s life go well; and the second that each person has a special responsibility for identifying what counts as success in his or her own life. Dworkin believes that values cohere and that in order to defend that coherence he has to take up a broad variety of philosophical issues that are not normally treated in one book. He discusses the metaphysics of value, the character of truth, the nature of interpretation, the conditions of agreement and disagreement, the phenomenon of moral responsibility and the problem of free will as well as more substantive issues of ethical, moral and legal theory.
Abstract:
Justice of the Peace, The
Comments: 205 p. 19 cm.

Bibliography: p. 199-202.
Abstract:
Karl Polanyi
Comments: Karl Polanyi's "The Great Transformation" is generally acclaimed as being among the most influential works of economic history in the twentieth century, and remains as vital in the current historical conjuncture as it was in his own. In its critique of nineteenth-century "market fundamentalism" it reads as a warning to our own neoliberal age, and is widely touted as a prophetic guidebook for those who aspire to understand the causes and dynamics of global economic turbulence at the end of the 2000s.

"Karl Polanyi: The Limits of the Market" is the first comprehensive introduction to Polanyi's ideas and legacy. It assesses not only the texts for which he is famous - prepared during his spells in American academia - but also his journalistic articles written in his first exile in Vienna, and lectures and pamphlets from his second exile, in Britain. It provides a detailed critical analysis of "The Great Transformation," but also surveys Polanyi's seminal writings in economic anthropology, the economic history of ancient and archaic societies, and political and economic theory. Its primary source base includes interviews with Polanyi's daughter, Kari Polanyi-Levitt, as well as the entire compass of his own published and unpublished writings in English and German.

This engaging and accessible introduction to Polanyi's thinking will appeal to students and scholars across the social sciences, providing a refreshing perspective on the roots of our current economic crisis.

Abstract:
Land, Kinship and Life-Cycle
Comments: These essays in Land, Kinship and Life-Cycle present detailed case studies from English rural communities over the period 1250-1850, these essays reveal that much land was transferred between living persons who were related neither by blood nor by marriage and that kin were often not the only members of work groups or assistance networks in the countryside. Although the focus is on the strata of English society below the landed aristocracy and the urban merchant elites, the preoccupation with those holding land whether under freehold or customary or copyhold tenure is tempered by essays that investigate the economic problems in the lifecycles of the property less or those unable through, for example, illness or age to work and manage their property.
Abstract:
Landlords and Tenants in Britain, 1440-1660
Comments: print

xv, 240 pages : illustrations ; 24 cm.

edited by Jane Whittle.

Includes bibliographical references (pages 222-232) and index.

Abstract:
Landscape and Englishness
Comments: 1 online resource (367 p.) :

Landscape has been central to definitions of Englishness for centuries. David Matless argues that landscape has been the site where English visions of the past, present and future have met in debates over questions of national identity, disputes over history and modernity, and ideals of citizenship and the body. Landscape and Englishness is extensively illustrated and draws on a wide range of material - topographical guides, health manuals, paintings, poetry, architectural polemic, photography, nature guides and novels.

Includes bibliographical references (p. 349-356) and index.; Contents; Acknowledgements; Introduction: Versions of Landscape and Englishness; PART I LANDSCAPE FOR A NEW ENGLISHNESS; 1 Ordering England; 2 Arts of Living: Landscape and Citizenship 1918-39; PART II ORGANIC ENGLAND; 3 English Ecologies; 4 The Organic English Body; PART III LANDSCAPES OF WAR AND RECONSTRUCTION; 5 Landscapes of War; 6 Geographies of the Reconstruction; 7 Citizens in Reconstruction; PART IV FESTIVALS AND REALIGNMENTS; 8 Landscape and Englishness in an Altered State; References; Select Bibliography; Photographic Acknowledgements; Index.
Abstract:
Language, History, and Class
Comments: viii, 320 p. : ill. ; 24 cm.

Includes bibliographical references (p. [298]-303) and index.
Abstract:
Late Marxism
Comments: In the name of an assault on "totalization" and "identity," a number of contemporary theorists have been busily washing Marxism's dialectical and utopian projects down the plug-hole of postmodernism and "post-politics." A case in point is recent interpretation of one of the greatest twentieth-century philosophers, Theodor Adorno. In this powerful book, Fredric Jameson proposes a radically different reading of Adorno's work, especially of his major works on philosophy and aesthetics: Negative Dialectics and Aesthetic Theory.

Jameson argues persuasively that Adorno's contribution to the development of Marxism remains unique and indispensable. He shows how Adorno's work on aesthetics performs deconstructive operations yet is in sharp distinction to the now canonical deconstructive genre of writing. He explores the complexity of Adorno's very timely affirmation of philosophy — of its possibility after the "end" of grand theory. Above all, he illuminates the subtlety and richness of Adorno's continuing emphasis on late capitalism as a totality within the very forms of our culture. In its lucidity, Late Marxism echoes the writing of its subject, to whose critical, utopian intelligence Jameson remains faithful.
Abstract:
Law, Land, and Family
Comments: Eileen Spring presents a fresh interpretation of the history of inheritance among the English gentry and aristocracy. In a work that recasts both the history of real property law and the history of the family, she finds that one of the principal and deter
Abstract:
Legacy of Boadicea, The
Comments: The Legacy of Boadicea explores the construction of personal and national identities in early modern England. It highlights the problems and anxieties of national identity in a nation with no native classical past.
Written in an accessible style, The Legacy of Boadicea:
* offers powerful new readings of the ancient British past in Shakespeare's King Lear and Cymbeline
* persuasively illuminates a 'Boadicean' heritage in royal iconography, drama, and the social symptoms of religious dissent
* articulates parallels between the eventual domestication of Britain's warrior queen in Restoration drama, and the social, political and legal decline in the status of women.
Abstract:
Leisure and Culture
Comments: ix, 234 p. ; 23 cm.

Includes bibliographical references (p. 215-226) and index.
Abstract:
Liberty's Dawn
Comments: DIVThis remarkable book looks at hundreds of autobiographies penned between 1760 and 1900 to offer an intimate firsthand account of how the Industrial Revolution was experienced by the working class. The Industrial Revolution brought not simply misery and poverty. On the contrary, Griffin shows how it raised incomes, improved literacy, and offered exciting opportunities for political action. For many, this was a period of new, and much valued, sexual and cultural freedom./divDIV /divDIVThis rich personal account focuses on the social impact of the Industrial Revolution, rather than its economic and political histories. In the tradition of best-selling books by Liza Picard, Judith Flanders, and Jerry White, Griffin gets under the skin of the period and creates a cast of colorful characters, including factory workers, miners, shoemakers, carpenters, servants, and farm laborers./div
Abstract:
Life Cycle in Western Europe, C. 1300-C. 1500, The
Comments: 244 p. ; 23 cm.

Includes bibliographical references (p. 216-238) and index.
Abstract:
Life, Death and the Elderly
Comments: Debates on policy concerning medical care and social welfare of the elderly become ever more pressing, and many of the assumptions on which they are based are now open to question. This study sets out to provide a historical perspective on the economic, medical, class and gender relations of the elderly, which until now have received relatively little attention. In particular, the position of the elderly is linked to the fundamental issues of health, disability and medical care. With attention currently focused on the setting of the retirement age, community and family care, and pensions, as well as wider debates on the rights of the elderly, this volume aims to supply a historical context for such issues.
Abstract:
Liquid Modernity
Comments: vi, 228 p. ; 24 cm.

Includes bibliographic references (p. [217]-224) and index.
Abstract:
Literacy in Early Modern Europe
Comments: print

ix, 266 p. ; 23 cm.

R.A. Houston.

Includes index.

Bibliography: p. 235-262.

Abstract:
Literary Theory and the Claims of History
Comments: print

xiii, 260 p. ; 24 cm.

Satya P. Mohanty.

Includes bibliographical references and index.

Abstract:
Literature and Complaint in England 1272-1553
Comments: xii, 215 p. : ill. ; 24 cm.

Abstract:
Literature and Politics in the English Reformation
Comments: print

vii, 253 p. ; 24 cm.

Tom Betteridge.

Includes bibliographical references (p. 233-248) and index.

Abstract:
Literature and Revolution in England, 1640-1660
Comments: xiv, 425 p. : ill. ; 24 cm.

LC CIP title: Anglia Rediviva : literature and revolution in England, c. 1640-c. 1660. Spine title: Literature & revolution in England, 1640-1660. Includes bibliographical references (p. 365-402) and index.
Abstract:
Literature, Letters and the Canonical in Early Modern Scotland
Comments: xxx, 158 p ; 24 cm.

Includes bibliographical references and index.
Abstract:
Lived Body, The
Comments: The Lived Body takes a fresh look at the notion of human embodiment and provides an ideal textbook for undergraduates on the growing number of courses on the sociology of the body.
The authors propose a new approach - an 'Embodied Sociology' - one which makes embodiment central rather than peripheral. They critically examine the dualist legacies of the past, assessing the ideas of a range of key thinkers, from Marx to Freud, Foucault to Giddens, Deleuze to Guattari and Irigary to Grosz, in terms of the bodily themes and issues they address.
They also explore new areas of research, including the 'fate' of embodiment in late modernity, sex, gender, medical technology and the body, the sociology of emotions, pain, sleep and artistic representations of the body.
The Lived Body will provide students and researchers in medical sociology, health sciences, cultural studies and philosophy with clear, accessible coverage of the major theories and debates in the sociology of the body and a challenging new way of thinking.
Abstract:
Local Communities in the Victorian Census Enumerators' Books
Comments: One of the key documentary sources for the study of the Victorian period, the census enumerators’ books contain key statistics on virtually every parish and settlement in England and Wales. With information on named individuals, along with families and households, this resource forms a central core of data for local, community-based studies for the Victorian period. Topics such as the enumeration process, employment and occupations, migration and population turnover, and residential patterns are all introduced with explanations on the census enumerators’ relation to the themes at hand.
Abstract:
Local Knowledge
Comments: In essays covering everything from art and common sense to charisma and constructions of the self, the eminent cultural anthropologist and author of "The Interpretation of Cultures" deepens our understanding of human societies through the intimacies of local knowledge. A companion volume to "The Interpretation of Cultures," this book continues GeertzOCOs exploration of the meaning of culture and the importance of shared cultural symbolism. With a new introduction by the author."
Abstract:
Local Literacies
Comments: xviii, 299 p. : ill. ; 24 cm.

Includes bibliographical references (p. 284-292) and indexes.
Abstract:
Local Markets and Regional Trade in Medieval Exeter
Comments: xvi, 442 p. : maps ; 24 cm.

Includes bibliographical references (p. 396-422) and index.
Abstract:
Local Origins of Modern Society, The
Comments: xvi, 319 p. : map ; 24 cm.

Includes bibliographical references (p. 265-309) and index.
Abstract:
Londinopolis
Comments: xi, 284 p. : ill., map ; 24 cm.

Includes bibliographical references and index.
Abstract:
Lord's Table, The
Comments: print

xviii, 184 p. ; 23 cm.

Gillian Feeley-Harnik.

Includes bibliographical references (p. 169-178) and index.

Abstract:
Lost Londons
Comments: A major study of the transformation of early modern London. By focusing on policing, prosecution, and the language and perceptions of the authorities and the underclasses, Paul Griffiths explores the swift growth of London and the changes to its cultures, communities, and environments. Through a series of thematic chapters he maps problem areas and people; reconstructs the atmosphere of the streets; and traces the development of policing in the city. The book provided the first full study of petty crime before 1660, analysing worlds and words of crime, criminal rings and cultures, and tracking changing meanings of crime to reveal alternative emphases on environmental crimes and crimes committed by women. It also examines the key roles of Bridewell prison, hospitals, medical provision, and penal practices, shedding light on investigation, detection, surveillance, and public prosecution. Viewed through this fascinating account, the city will never look the same again.
Abstract:
Love and Power in the Peasant Family
Comments: print

viii, 206 p. : ill. ; 24 cm.

Martine Segalen ; translated by Sarah Matthews.

Translation of: Mari et femme dans la société paysanne.

Includes index.

Bibliography: p. [194]-200.

Abstract:
Love, Friendship, Faith
Comments: 241 p.

This ground-breaking volume explores the terrain of friendship against the historical backdrop of early modern Europe. In these thought-provoking essays the terms of friendship are explored - from the most intimate and erotically charged to the reciprocities of village life. This is a rich offering in social and cultural history that is attuned to the pervasive language of religion. A hidden history is revealed - of friendships that we have lost, and of friendships starkly, and movingly, familiar.

Cover; Contents; Notes on Contributors; Introduction; 1 Friendship s Loss: Alan Bray s Making of History; 2 Sacred or Profane? Reflections on Love and Friendship in the Middle Ages; 3 Friendship in Catholic Reformation Eichst�tt; 4 A Society of Sodomites: Religion and Homosexuality in Renaissance England; 5 Swil-bols and Tos-pots : Drink Culture and Male Bonding in England, c.1560 1640; 6 The Politics of Women s Friendship in Early Modern England; 7 Friends and Neighbours in Early Modern England: Biblical Translations and Social Norms. 8 Tricksters, Lords and Servants: Begging, Friendship and Masculinity in Eighteenth-Century England9 Spinoza and Friends: Religion, Philosophy and Friendship in the Berlin Enlightenment; Index. Electronic reproduction.Available via World Wide Web.
Abstract:
Lying-in
Comments: xviii, 322 p. : ill. ; 25 cm.

Includes bibliographical references (p. 304-314) and index.
Abstract:
Maids and Mistresses, Cousins and Queens
Comments: print

xviii, 350 p. ; 24 cm.

edited by Susan Frye, Karen Robertson.

"Began as a seminar at the Shakespeare Association of America meeting of 1993 in Atlanta and the project continued to expand"--Foreword.

Includes bibliographical references (p. 313-341) and index.

Abstract:
Making History Count
Comments: xxi, 547 p. : ill. ; 26 cm.

Includes bibliographical references (p. 529-538) and indexes.
Abstract:
Making of English National Identity, The
Comments: Why is English national identity so enigmatic and so elusive? Why, unlike the Scots, Welsh, Irish and most of continental Europe, do the English find it so difficult to say who they are? The Making of English National Identity, first published in 2003, is a fascinating exploration of Englishness and what it means to be English. Drawing on historical, sociological and literary theory, Krishan Kumar examines the rise of English nationalism and issues of race and ethnicity from earliest times to the present day. He argues that the long history of the English as an imperial people has, as with other imperial people like the Russians and the Austrians, developed a sense of missionary nationalism which in the interests of unity and empire has necessitated the repression of ordinary expressions of nationalism. Professor Kumar's lively and provocative approach challenges readers to reconsider their pre-conceptions about national identity and who the English really are.
Abstract:
Making of the Modern Mind
Comments: The Making of the Modern Mind traces the emergence of "consciousness" in social thought from the 17th Century to the 21st. Against the classical notions of consciousness and self, alternative agendas began to be developed in the 19th Century by figures as diverse as Marx and Nietzsche. The struggles between classical conceptions of consciousness and these alternatives--which promised more radical and emancipatory interpretations--continued into the 20th Century.From the start, the concept of "consciousness" connected with a range of other notions. Questions of the self and of identity were widely disputed in the Enlightenment whilst the 20th Century contributed new concerns, chiefly the philosophical issues of being and acting and the problematic status of reality for a theory of mind. Today, consciousness is viewed much more as a public and linguistic world rather than a private and mentalistic one.The Making of the Modern Mind explores the contemporary debates around consciousness and identity, crucially setting the analysis within its social and historical context. Written in a clear and engaging style, the book will be of interest to students in Philosophy, Psychology, Sociology and Anthropology.
Abstract:
Making of the Modern Self, The
Comments: print

xviii, 414 p. : ill. ; 25 cm.

Dror Wahrman.

Includes bibliographical references and index.

Abstract:
Manhood in Early Modern England
Comments: xi, 247 p. ; 22 cm.

Includes bibliographical references (p. 221-232) and index.
Abstract:
Manhood in the Making
Comments: xiii, 258 p. ; 22 cm.

Includes bibliographical references (p. 233-248) and index.
Abstract:
Mappings
Comments: Mappings explores what mapping has meant in the past and how its meanings have altered. How have maps and mapping served to order and represent physical, social and imaginative worlds? How has the practice of mapping shaped modern seeing and knowing? In what ways do contemporary changes in our experience of the world alter the meanings and practice of mapping, and vice versa?

In their diverse expressions, maps and the representational processes of mapping have constructed the spaces of modernity since the early Renaissance. The map's spatial fixity, its capacity to frame, control and communicate knowledge through combining image and text, and cartography's increasing claims to scientific authority, make mapping at once an instrument and a metaphor for rational understanding of the world.

Among the topics the authors investigate are projective and imaginative mappings; mappings of terraqueous spaces; mapping and localism at the 'chorographic' scale; and mapping as personal exploration.

With essays by Jerry Brotton, Paul Carter, Michael Charlesworth, James Corner, Wystan Curnow, Christian Jacob, Luciana de Lima Martins, David Matless, Armand Mattelart, Lucia Nuti and Alessandro Scafi
Abstract:
Maps of Meaning
Comments:

This innovative book marks a significant departure from tradition anlayses of the evolution of cultural landscapes and the interpretation of past environments.  Maps of Meaning proposes a new agenda for cultural geography, one set squarely in the context of contemporary social and cultural theory.

Notions of place and space are explored through the study of elite and popular cultures, gender and sexuality, race, language and ideology. Questioning the ways in which we invest the world with meaning, the book is an introduction to both culture's geographies and the geography of culture.

Abstract:
Marathas, Marauders, and State Formation in Eighteenth-Century India
Comments: The Set Of Historical Essays In This Book Challenge Many Cherished Assumptions About The Century Between The Mughal Empire And The British Colonial Period. 9 Essays Cover - Scarf And Sword: Thugs, Marauders, And State-Formation In Eighteenth-Century Malwa - The Slow Conquest: Administrative Integration Of Malwa Into The Maratha Empire, 1720-60 - Legitimacy And Loyalty In Some Successor States Of The Eighteenth Century - Forts And Social Control In The Maratha State - Recovery From Adversity In Eighteenth-Century India: R-Thinking `Villages`, `Peasants`, And Politics In Pre-Modern Kingdoms - Kingship And Pargana In Eighteenth-Century Khandesh - Bhils And The Idea Of A Criminal Tribe In Nineteenth-Century India - Burhanpur: Entrepot And Hinterland, 1650-1750 - Zones Of Military Entrepreneurship In India, 1500-1700. Condition Good.
Abstract:
Market Institutions, Governance, and Development
Comments: print

xii, 370 p. : ill. ; 24 cm.

Dilip Mookherjee.

Includes bibliographical references.

Abstract: On development economics theories in India.
Marriage and Love in England
Comments: xi, 380 p. ; 24 cm.

Includes index. Bibliography: p. [345]-366.
Abstract:
Marriage and Property
Comments: vi, 192 p. ; 24cm.

Matrimonial property. Law,. to 1900. Social aspects (BNB/PRECIS) Includes bibliographies and index.
Abstract:
Marriage, Sex, and Civic Culture in Late Medieval London
Comments:

Awarded honorable mention for the 2007 Wallace K. Ferguson Prize sponsored by the Canadian Historical Association

How were marital and sexual relationships woven into the fabric of late medieval society, and what form did these relationships take? Using extensive documentary evidence from both the ecclesiastical court system and the records of city and royal government, as well as advice manuals, chronicles, moral tales, and liturgical texts, Shannon McSheffrey focuses her study on England's largest city in the second half of the fifteenth century.

Marriage was a religious union—one of the seven sacraments of the Catholic Church and imbued with deep spiritual significance—but the marital unit of husband and wife was also the fundamental domestic, social, political, and economic unit of medieval society. As such, marriage created political alliances at all levels, from the arena of international politics to local neighborhoods. Sexual relationships outside marriage were even more complicated. McSheffrey notes that medieval Londoners saw them as variously attributable to female seduction or to male lustfulness, as irrelevant or deeply damaging to society and to the body politic, as economically productive or wasteful of resources. Yet, like marriage, sexual relationships were also subject to control and influence from parents, relatives, neighbors, civic officials, parish priests, and ecclesiastical judges.

Although by medieval canon law a marriage was irrevocable from the moment a man and a woman exchanged vows of consent before two witnesses, in practice marriage was usually a socially complicated process involving many people. McSheffrey looks more broadly at sex, governance, and civic morality to show how medieval patriarchy extended a far wider reach than a father's governance over his biological offspring. By focusing on a particular time and place, she not only elucidates the culture of England's metropolitan center but also contributes generally to our understanding of the social mechanisms through which premodern European people negotiated their lives.

Abstract:
Marriage, Wife-Beating and the Law in Victorian England
Comments: x, 210 p.; 23 cm.

Includes index. Includes bibliographical references (p. [180]-202)
Abstract:
Marx, Durkheim, Weber
Comments:

This Second Edition is a thoroughly revised, expanded version of the bestselling student text in classical social theory. Author Kenneth Morrison provides an authoritative, accessible undergraduate guide to the three pivotal figures in the classical tradition. Readable and stimulating, the Second Edition of Marx, Durkheim, Weber: Formations of Modern Social Thought explains the key ideas of these thinkers and situates them in their historical and philosophical contexts.

Abstract:
Masculinities
Comments: xxv, 324 p., [8] p. of plates : ill. ; 23 cm.

Includes bibliographical references (p. [282]-310) and index.
Abstract:
Masculinity and Male Codes of Honor in Modern France
Comments: print

ix, 316 p. : ill. ; 24 cm.

Robert A. Nye.

Originally published: New York : Oxford University Press, 1993, in series: Studies in the history of sexuality.

Includes bibliographical references (p. 229-309) and index.

Abstract:
Masterless Men
Comments: print

xxii, 233 p. ; 24 cm.

A.L. Beier.

Includes index.

Bibliography: p. [176]-206.

Abstract:
Material Renaissance, The
Comments: Despite the recent interests of economic and art historians in the workings of the market, we still know remarkably little about the everyday context for the exchange of objects and the meaning of demand in the lives of individuals in the Renaissance. Nor do we have much sense of the relationship between the creation and purchase of works of art and the production, buying and selling of other types of objects in Italy in the period. The Material Renaissance addresses these issues of economic and social life. 



Abstract:
Maurice Blanchot
Comments: This timely collection of essays is the first to be written on the work of Maurice Blanchot in English. One of the finest writers of our time, Blanchot is a contemporary of Bataille and Levinas; his writing has influenced the likes of Derrida and Foucault.
Eminent commentators featured here include: Simon Critchley, Paul Davies, Cristopher Fynsk, Rodolphe Gasche, Leslie Hill, Michael Holland, Jeffery Mehlman, Roger Laporte, Ian Maclachlan, Marie-Claire Ropars-Wuilleumier, Gillian Rose and Ann Smock.
The essays consider the political implications of Blanchot's questioning the relationship between philosophy and literature. In addition, the provocative issue of Blanchot's politics during the 1930s is clarified by a letter from Blanchot to one of the contributors, published here for the first time.
Maurice Blanchot: The Demand of Writing is a crucial selection for all students of philosophy, literature or French studies.
Abstract:
Meanings of Manhood in Early Modern England
Comments: x, 292 p. : ill. ; 23 cm.

Includes bibliographical references (p. [254]-276) and index. The constant age -- The imagined body of 'man's estate' -- Models of manhood -- Youthful excess and fraternal bonding -- The violence of manhood -- Respectability, sex and status -- Credit, provision, and worth -- The 'ancienter sort' -- Conclusion : manhood, patriarchy, and gender in early modern England.
Abstract:
Medicine, Rationality, and Experience
Comments: xvii, 242 p. ; 24 cm.

Bibliography: p. 208-233.
Abstract:
Meetings, Manners, and Civilization
Comments: xiii, 370 p. : ill. ; 24 cm.

Includes bibliographical references (p. [345]-361) and index.
Abstract:
Memory of the People, The
Comments: Did ordinary people in early modern England have any coherent sense of the past? Andy Wood's pioneering new book charts how popular memory generated a kind of usable past that legitimated claims to rights, space and resources. He explores the genesis of customary law in the medieval period; the politics of popular memory; local identities and traditions; gender and custom; literacy, orality and memory; landscape, space and memory; and the legacy of this cultural world for later generations. Drawing from a wealth of sources ranging from legal proceedings and parochial writings to proverbs and estate papers, he shows how custom formed a body of ideas built up generation after generation from localized patterns of cooperation and conflict. This is a unique account of the intimate connection between landscape, place and identity and of how the poorer and middling sort felt about the world around them.
Abstract:
Memory, History, Forgetting
Comments: xvii, 642 p. : ill. ; 24 cm.

Includes bibliographical references and index.
Abstract:
Men at Work
Comments: xv, 315 p. ; 24 cm.

Includes bibliographical references (p. 288-304) and index.
Abstract:
Mental Maps
Comments: print

204 p. illus., maps. 20 cm.

[by] Peter Gould and Rodney White.

Includes index.

Bibliography: p. 193-197.

Abstract:
Michel de Certeau
Comments: xii, 188 p ; 24 cm.

Includes bibliographical references and index.
Abstract:
Michel de Certeau
Comments: Since his death in 1986, Michel de Certeau's reputation as a thinker has steadily grown both in France and throughout the English-speaking world. His work is extraordinarily innovative and wide-ranging, cutting across issues in historiography, literary and cultural studies, anthropology, sociology, theology, philosophy and psychoanalysis.

This book represents the first full-length study of Certeau's thought. It is organized around the central theme of interpretation and alterity, which Ahearne uses to illuminate Certeau's work as a whole. The author also examines Certeau's theory and practice of historiography; his reflection on the relations between changing historical forms of writing, reading and orality; and his distinction between the "strategic" programmes of the politically powerful and the "tactics" of the relatively powerless.

Ahearne places Certeau's work in its general intellectual context, relating it to the views of important contemporary thinkers, such as Pierre Bourdieu and Michel Foucault, and demonstrating the decisive importance to Certeau's thought of the writings of the early modern mystics and travellers.

This book constitutes an excellent critical introduction to Certeau's work, while also providing a comprehensive and nuanced reading for those already familiar with his thought.

Abstract:
Michel de Certeau
Comments: de Certeau is often considered to be the theorist of everyday life par excellence. This book provides an unrivalled critical introduction to de Certeau's work and influence and looks at his key ideas and asks how should we try to understand him in relation to theories of modern culture and society.

Ian Buchanan demonstrates how de Certeau was influenced by Lacan, Merleau-Ponty and Greimas and the meaning of de Certeau's notions of `strategy', `tactics', `place' and `space' are clearly described. The book argues that de Certeau died before developing the full import of his work for the study of culture and convincingly, it tries to complete or imagine the directions that de Certeau's work would have taken, had he lived.

Abstract:
Middle Sort of People in Provincial England, 1600-1750, The
Comments: Exploring the origins of 'middle-class' status in the English provinces during a formative period of social and economic change, this book provides the first comparative study of the nature of social identity in early modern provincial England. It questions definitions of a 'middling' group, united by shared patterns of consumption and display, and examines the bases for such identity in three detailed case studies of the 'middle sort' in East Anglia, Lancashire, and Dorset. Dr.French identifies how the 'middling' described their status, and examines this through their social position in parish life and government, and through their material possessions.Instead of a coherent, unified 'middle sort of people' this book reveals division between self-proclaimed parish rulers (the 'chief inhabitants') and a wider body of modestly prosperous householders, who nevertheless shared social perspectives bounded within their localities. By the eighteenth century, many of these 'chief inhabitants' were trying to break out of their parish pecking orders - not by associating with a wider 'middle class', but by modifying ideas of gentility to suit theircircumstances (and pockets).French concludes as a result, that while the presence of a distinct 'middling' stratum is apparent, the social identity of the people remained fragmented - restricted by parochial society on the one hand, and overshadowed by the prospect of gentility on the other. He offers new interpretation and insights into the composition and scale of the society in early modern England.
Abstract:
Middling Sort of People, The
Comments: Preface - Introduction; J.Barry - 'Sorts of People' in Tudor and Stuart England; K.Wrightson - Apprenticeship, Social Mobility and the Middling Sort 1550-1800; C.Brooks - Bourgeois Collectivism? Urban Association and the Middling Sort; J.Barry - Professions, Ideology and the Middling Sort in the late Sixteenth and Early Seventeenth Centuries; C.Brooks - The Middling Sort in London; P.Earle - The Middling Sort in Eighteenth Century Politics; N.Rogers - The Middling Sort in Eighteenth Century Colchester: Independence, Social Relations and the Community Broker; S.D'Cruze - Bibliography - Notes and References - Notes on Contributors - Index
Abstract:
Migrant Belongings
Comments: xi, 209 p., [4] p. of plates. : map, plates.

Includes bibliographical references (p. 189-203) and index.
Abstract:
Migration and Society in Early Modern England
Comments: print

355 p. : ill. ; 23 cm.

edited by Peter Clark and David Souden.

Spine title: Migration & society in early modern England.

Five of the essays were previously published in various sources, 1971-1979.

The sequence of pages omits numbers 7-10.

Includes index.

Bibliography: p. 333-344.

Abstract:
Mind, Language and Society
Comments: 175 s. ; 20cm

Abstract:
Modern Feminist Thought
Comments: [vii], 270 p. ; 22 cm.

Abstract:
Modern Genre Theory
Comments: xvi, 287 p. ; 23 cm.

Includes bibliographical references (p. 267-278) and index. Criticism of the theory of artistic and literary kinds / Benedetto Croce -- The literary fact / Yury Tynyanov -- Fairy tale transformations / Vladimir Propp -- Epic and novel : toward a methodology for the study of the novel / Mikhail Bakhtin -- The problem of speech genres / Mikhail Bakhtin -- The mythos of summer : romance / Northrop Frye -- Royal genres / Ireneusz Opacki -- Theory of genres and medieval literature / Hans Robert Jauss -- Genre-systems and the functions of literature / Rosalie Colie -- Magical narratives : on the dialectical use of genre criticism / Frederic Jameson -- The origin of genres / Tzvetan Todorov -- The architext / G�rard Genette -- The law of genre / Jacques Derrida -- Transformations of genre / Alastair Fowler -- Genre and gender / Mary Eagleton.
Abstract:
Modern Geographical Thought
Comments: 7.0"x10.2"x1.2"; 1.8 lb; 342 pages

Richard Peet looks in detail at the main trends in human geographic thought over the last thirty years, relating these to broader themes in philosophy and social theory. Beginning with existential phenomenology and humanistic geography, the book covers Marxism and radical geography, structuralism, structuration theory, realism, locality studies, various streams of poststructuralism and postmodernism, and feminism. Each chapter examines a few theories in depth, concentrating on the major works and the nature of their contribution. Many of the ideas covered are dense and complex, but the reader is drawn gradually into the text through notions understandable to students. After spending time with this book the reader should be able to tackle virtually any philosophical theme in contemporary geographic thought. The book will be central to courses in geographical thought and the history of geographical thought, and as part of virtually all courses in human geography whcih entail philosophy and theory.
Abstract:
Modernism
Comments: viii, 226 p. ; 21 cm.

Includes bibliographical references (p. [213]-219) and index.
Abstract:
Modernist Literature
Comments: xvii, 246 p. ;

Includes bibliographical references and index.
Abstract:
Monetary Economics
Comments:
This fully revised second edition of Bain and Howells' Monetary Economics provides an up-to-date examination of monetary policy as it is practised and the theory underlying it. The authors link the conduct of monetary policy to the IS/PC/MR model and extend this further through the addition of a simple model of the banking sector. They demonstrate why monetary policy is central to the management of a modern economy, showing how it might have lasting effects on real variables, and look at how the current economic crisis has weakened the ability of policymakers to influence aggregate demand through the structure of interest rates.
The second edition:
  • features a realistic account of the conduct of monetary policy when the money supply is endogenous
  • provides a detailed and up-to-date account of the conduct of monetary policy and links this explicitly to a framework for teaching macroeconomics
  • includes recent changes in money market operations and an examination of the problems posed for monetary policy by the recent financial crisis

Monetary Economics is an ideal core textbook for advanced undergraduate modules in monetary economics and monetary theory and policy.
Abstract:
Money and the Morality of Exchange
Comments: This volume deals with the way in which money is symbolically represented in a range of different cultures, from South and South-east Asia, Africa and South America. It is also concerned with the moral evaluation of monetary and commercial exchanges as against exchanges of other kinds. The essays cast radical doubt on many Western assumptions about money: that it is the acid which corrodes community, depersonalises human relationships, and reduces differences of quality to those of mere quantity; that it is the instrument of man's freedom, and so on. Rather than supporting the proposition that money produces easily specifiable changes in world view, the emphasis here is on the way in which existing world views and economic systems give rise to particular ways of representing money. But this highly relativistic conclusion is qualified once we shift the focus from money to the system of exchange as a whole. One rather general pattern that then begins to emerge is of two separate but related transactional orders, the majority of systems making some ideological space for relatively impersonal, competitive and individual acquisitive activity. This implies that even in a non-monetary economy these features are likely to exist within a certain sphere of activity, and that it is therefore misleading to attribute them to money. By so doing, a contrast within cultures is turned into a contrast between cultures, thereby reinforcing the notion that money itself has the power to transform the nature of social relationships.
Abstract:
Money in the Medieval English Economy 973-1489
Comments: print

xv, 317 p. : ill. ; 22 cm.

J.L. Bolton.

Includes bibliographical references (p. 310) and index.

Abstract:
Money/space
Comments: xviii, 404 p. : ill., maps ; 24 cm.

Includes bibliographical references (p. [368]-393) and index.
Abstract:
Moral Economy, The
Comments: The Moral Economy examines the nexus of poverty, credit, and trust in early modern Europe. It starts with an examination of poverty, the need for credit, and the lending practices of different social groups. It then reconstructs the battles between the Churches and the State around the ban on usury, and analyzes the institutions created to eradicate usury and the informal petty financial economy that developed as a result. Laurence Fontaine unpacks the values that structured these lending practices, namely, the two competing cultures of credit that coexisted, fought, and sometimes merged: the vibrant aristocratic culture and the capitalistic merchant culture. More broadly, Fontaine shows how economic trust between individuals was constructed in the early modern world. By creating a dialogue between past and present, and contrasting their definitions of poverty, the role of the market, and the mechanisms of microcredit, Fontaine draws attention to the necessity of recognizing the different values that coexist in diverse political economies.
Abstract:
Moral World of the Law, The
Comments: print

xi, 262 p. ; 24 cm.

edited by Peter Coss.

Includes bibliographical references and index.

Abstract:
Music and Society in Early Modern England
Comments: print

sound disc

xiii, 609 p. : ill., music ; 26 cm. + 1 sound disc (digital; 4 3/4 in.)

Christopher Marsh.

CD track list, contents notes, lyrics and musical examples on (p. 526-555). Performed by the Dufay Collective with invited guests.

Includes bibliographical references and index.

Abstract:
Myth and Metropolis
Comments: ix, 227 p. ; 24 cm.

Includes bibliographical references (p. [215]-221) and index.
Abstract:
Names and Naming Patterns in England, 1538-1700
Comments: xiii, 223 p. : ill. ; 23 cm.

Includes bibliographical references (p. [203]-218) and index.
Abstract:
Nation in History, The
Comments: 106p.

Abstract:
Nationalism
Comments: x, 164 p. ; 23 cm.

Includes bibliographical references (p. [144]-156) and index.
Abstract:
Nationalism
Comments:

Abstract:
Nationalism and Modernism
Comments: print

xiv, 270 p. ; 25 cm.

Anthony D. Smith.

Includes bibliographical references (p. [244]-263) and index.

Abstract:
Nations and Nationalism Since 1780
Comments: Nations and Nationalism since 1780 is Eric Hobsbawm's widely acclaimed and highly readable enquiry into the question of nationalism. Events in the late twentieth century in Eastern Europe and the Soviet republics have since reinforced the central importance of nationalism in the history of the political evolution and upheaval. This second edition has been updated in light of those events, with a final chapter addressing the impact of the dramatic changes that have taken place. Also included are additional maps to illustrate nationalities, languages and political divisions across Europe in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries.
Abstract:
Negara
Comments: xii, 295 p., [1] leaf of plates : col. ill. ; 25 cm.

Includes index. Bibliography: p. 267-288. Bali and historical method -- Political definition: the sources of order -- Political anatomy: the internal organization of the ruling class -- Political anatomy: the village and the state -- Political statement: spectacle and ceremony -- Bali and political theory.
Abstract:
Negotiating Power in Early Modern Society
Comments: print

x, 302 p. ; 23 cm.

edited by Michael J. Braddick and John Walter.

Includes bibliographical references (p. 249-305) and index.

Abstract:
Nerves of State, The
Comments: The period from 1558 to 1714 saw a marked change in the scale of taxation and its significance to the structure of public finances. Although the central significance of taxation and finances has been widely acknowledged in accounts of the political history of the early modern period, this study deals with the issue thematically over a broad period. The chronological span of the study allows a full outline of an important transformation of the financial structure of the English state, providing a new context in which to understand familiar and important issues.
Abstract:
New Cultural History, The
Comments: print

ix, 244 p. : ill. ; 24 cm.

by Aletta Biersack ... [et al.] ; edited and with an introduction by Lynn Hunt.

Includes bibliographical references.

Abstract:
New Economics of Inequality and Redistribution, The
Comments: print

xvii, 188 pages : illustrations ; 23 cm.

Samuel Bowles in collaboration with Christina Fong, Herbert Gintis, Arjun Jayadev, and Ugo Pagano.

Includes bibliographical references (pages 171-183) and index.

Abstract: "Economists warn that policies to level the economic playing field come with a hefty price tag. But this so-called 'equality-efficiency trade-off' - has proven difficult to document. The data suggest, instead, that the extraordinary levels of economic inequality now experienced in many economies are detrimental to the economy. Moreover, recent economic experiments and other evidence confirm that most citizens are committed to fairness and are willing to sacrifice to help those less fortunate than themselves. Incorporating the latest results from behavioral economics and the new microeconomics of credit and labor markets, Bowles shows that escalating economic disparity is not the unavoidable price of progress. Rather it is policy choice - often a very costly one. Here drawing on his experience both as a policy advisor and an academic economist, Samuel Bowles offers an alternative direction, a novel and optimistic account of a more just and better working economy"--
New Historicism, The
Comments: print

xvi, 317 p. ; 23 cm.

edited by H. Aram Veeser.

Includes bibliographical references.

Abstract:
New Literary Histories
Comments: print

viii, 248 p. ; 23 cm.

Claire Colebrook.

Includes bibliographical references (p. 236-242) and index.

Abstract:
New Perspectives on Historical Writing
Comments:

A new edition of this best-selling collection of essays by leading experts on historical methodology.

Since its first publication in 1992, New Perspectives on Historical Writing has become a key reference work used by students and researchers interested in the most important developments in the methodology and practice of history. For this new edition, the book has been thoroughly revised and updated and includes an entirely new chapter on environmental history.

Peter Burke is joined here by a distinguished group of internationally renowned historians, including Robert Darnton, Ivan Gaskell, Richard Grove, Giovanni Levi, Roy Porter, Gwyn Prins, Joan Scott, Jim Sharpe, Richard Tuck, and Henk Wesseling. The contributions examine a wide range of interdisciplinary areas of historical research, including women's history, history "from below," the history of reading, oral history, the history of the body, microhistory, the history of events, the history of images, and political history.

Abstract:
New Philosophy of Social Science
Comments:

Under the influence of postempiricism, the philosophy of science has changedenormously in recent years. New Philosophy of Social Science provides a clear and useful overview ofthe new synthesis that has taken place. Bohman argues for a theoretical and methodological pluralismgrounded in an account of the nature of the objects of social theory, which are necessarilyindeterminate and open ended: the new, postempiricist philosophy of social science "must find rigorwithin indeterminacy. "Bohman's position, that you can start from actual practices in the socialsciences, accept the fact that they will always contain indeterminacy and ambiguity, and yet be ableto construct viable norms, is buttressed by a number of case studies. These include examples drawnfrom rational choice theory, ethnomethodology, and the theory of communicative action. In theprocess, Bohman describes the status of such issues as causality, rules, interpretation, holism, andsocial criticism. The argument is not tied to a specific theoretical point of view, although ittakes the program of the Frankfurt School as an indication of the path toward a proper philosophy ofthe social sciences.James Bohman is Associate Professor in the Department of Philosophy at St. LouisUniversity.

Abstract:
Newspapers, Politics and English Society, 1695-1855
Comments: 246 p : ill.

Includes bibliographical references (p. ) and index.
Abstract:
Nights in the Big City
Comments: print

351 p. : ill. ; 24 cm.

Joachim Schlör ; translated by Pierre Gottfried Imhof and Dafydd Rees Roberts.

Includes bibliographical references (p. 323-343) and index.

Abstract:
Northamptonshire Lieutenancy Papers and Other Documents, 1580-1614
Comments: print

xxxiv, 113 p., [4] leaves of plates : ill. ; 26 cm.

edited by Jeremy Goring and Joan Wake.

Includes bibliographical references and indexes.

Abstract:
Of Time, Passion, and Knowledge
Comments: "Only a wayfarer born under unruly stars would attempt to put into practice in our epoch of proliferating knowledge the Heraclitean dictum that men who love wisdom must be inquirers into very many things indeed.'" Thus begins this remarkable interdisciplinary study of time by a master of the subject. And while developing a theory of "time as conflict", J. T. Fraser does offer "many things indeed"--an enormous range of ideas about matter, life, death, evolution, and value. "This is an extremely valuable and unusual book--original, witty, and aware of immense ranges of contemporary thought". --David Park, Washington Post Book World "This is an important book about an important subject, the nature of time. . . . [Fraser] draws upon the spectrum of disciplines and illustrates that the theme of time can provide a common ground for discourse between specializations. The coverage is wide, and the book is tightly packed with information, but Fraser's driving enthusiasm makes it interesting and enriching". --Francis C. Haber, American Scientist
Abstract:
Old Age in English History
Comments: 'Thane's historical approach effectively demolishes myths of a list golden age for the old, and is an excellent corrective to the kind of social science that refers back to an imagined 'traditional society'.' -The Independent'Chronicles the old from Roman times to the modern day and is full of vivid quotations...The style of writing was so good I read it on one glorious Saturday afternoon in the garden... Anyone interested in retirement planning, the elderly and demographics should read this book.' -Pensions World'A challenge to all the usual tired, blasted, ragged, shrivelled, chicken-skinned, catnapping, Tiresias-dugged, slack-throated, liver-spotted, incontinent and Celtic Twighlight twaddling assumptions about ageing and old age.' -The Guardian'She [Thane] shows time and time again the dangers of comparing what she describes as an idealised past with a half understood present.' -Social History TodayAt the turn of the millennium more people are living into their seventies, eighties, nineties and even beyond. Is the existence of so many old people in Britain something new? Are they creating an intolerable burden of costs of care and pensions on a shrinking younger generation? This book shows that old people have always been an important presence in English society. It describes the variety of ways in which they have lived their lives, and argues that as more people live longer, they are fit and active for longer. Older people can and do benefit society more than they burden it.
Abstract:
On Narrative
Comments: x, 270 p. : ill. ; 23 cm.

"The articles in this volume originally appeared in Critical inquiry, volume 7, number 1 (Autumn 1980)." Includes bibliographical references and index. White, H.The value of narrativity in the representation of reality --Schafer, R.Narration in the psychoanalytic dialogue --Derrida, J.The law of genre --Kermode, F.Secrets and narrative sequence --Goodman, N.Twisted tales --Chatman, S.What novels can do that films can't (and vice versa) --Turner, V.Social dramas and stories about them --Ricoeur, P.Narrative time --LeGuin, U.K.It was a dark and stormy night --Afterthoughts on narrative:Hernadi, P.On the how, what, and why of narrative.Scholes, R.Language, narrative, and anti-narrative.Smith, B.H.Narrative versions, narrative theories --Critical response:Mink, L.O.Everyman his or her own annalist --Waldman, M.R.The otherwise unnoteworthy year 711 --White, H.The narrativization of real events --Goodman, N.The telling and the told --Chatman, S.Reply to Barbara Herrnstein Smith.
Abstract:
On Voluntary Servitude
Comments: xi,289p. ; 24cm.

Abstract:
On the Parish?
Comments: xi, 521 p. ; 22 cm.

Includes bibliographical references and index.
Abstract:
Oneself as Another
Comments: print

ix, 363 p. ; 23 cm.

Paul Ricœur ; translated by Kathleen Blamey.

Translation of: Soi-m̂eme comme un autre.

Based on the 1986 Gifford lectures, given by the author.

Includes bibliographical references and index.

Abstract:
Oppositional Imagination, The
Comments: x, 245 p. ; 24 cm.

Includes bibliographical references and index.
Abstract:
Oral and Literate Culture in England, 1500-1700
Comments: xi, 497 p., [12] p. of plates : ill. ; 23 cm.

Includes bibliographical references (p. [414]-457) and index.
Abstract:
Order and Disorder in Early Modern England
Comments: xiii, 248 p. ; 23 cm.

Includes bibliographical references and indexes.
Abstract:
Order of Books, The
Comments: print

xi, 126 p. : ill. ; 23 cm.

Roger Chartier ; translated by Lydia G. Cochrane.

Includes bibliographical references and index.

Abstract:
Order of Things, The
Comments: When one defines "order" as a sorting of priorities, it becomes beautifully clear as to what Foucault is doing here. With virtuoso showmanship, he weaves an intensely complex history of thought. He dips into literature, art, economics and even biology in The Order of Things, possibly one of the most significant, yet most overlooked, works of the twentieth century. Eclipsed by his later work on power and discourse, nonetheless it was The Order of Things that established Foucault's reputation as an intellectual giant. Pirouetting around the outer edge of language, Foucault unsettles the surface of literary writing. In describing the limitations of our usual taxonomies, he opens the door onto a whole new system of thought, one ripe with what he calls "exotic charm". Intellectual pyrotechnics from the master of critical thinking, this book is crucial reading for those who wish to gain insight into that odd beast called Postmodernism, and a must for any fan of Foucault.
Abstract:
Ordering of Time, The
Comments: print

ix, 168 p. : ill. ; 23 cm.

Arno Borst ; translated from the German by Andrew Winnard.

Includes bibliographical references (p. [133]-161) and index.

Abstract:
Origins of English Financial Markets: Investment and Speculation Before the South Sea Bubble, The
Comments: 6.1"x9.1"x1.0"; 1.3 lb; 298 pages

The late seventeenth century was a crucial period in English financial history. A host of joint-stock companies emerged offering the opportunity for investment in projects ranging from the manufacture of paper to the search for sunken treasure. Driven by the demands of the Nine Years' War, the state also employed innovative tactics to attract money, its most famous scheme being the incorporation of the Bank of England. This is the first comprehensive study of the choices and actions of the investors who enthusiastically embraced London's new financial market. It highlights the interactions between public and private finance, looks at how information circulated around the market and was used by speculators and investors, and documents the establishment of the institutions - the Bank of England, the national debt and an active secondary market in that debt - on which England's financial system was built.
Abstract:
Origins of Liberty, The
Comments:

Why would sovereigns ever grant political or economic liberty to their subjects? Under what conditions would rational rulers who possess ultimate authority and who seek to maximize power and wealth ever give up any of that authority? This book draws on a wide array of empirical and theoretical approaches to answer these questions, investigating both why sovereign powers might liberalize and when.

The contributors to this volume argue that liberalization or democratization will only occur when those in power calculate that the expected benefits to them will exceed the costs. More specifically, rulers take five main concerns into account in their cost-benefit analysis as they decide to reinforce or relax controls: personal welfare, personal power, internal order, external order, and control over policy--particularly economic policy. The book shows that repression is a tempting first option for rulers seeking to maximize their benefits, but that liberalization becomes more attractive as a means of minimizing losses when it becomes increasingly certain that the alternatives are chaos, deposition, or even death. Chapters cover topics as diverse as the politics of seventeenth-century England and of twentieth-century Chile; why so many countries have liberalized in recent decades; and why even democratic governments see a need to reduce state power. The book makes use of formal modeling, statistical analysis, and traditional historical analysis.

The contributors are Paul Drake, Stephen Haggard, William Heller, Robert Kaufman, Phil Keefer, Brian Loveman, Mathew McCubbins, Douglass North, Ronald Rogowski, and Barry Weingast.

Abstract:
Ornamentalism
Comments: With the return of Hong Kong to the Chinese government in 1997, the empire that had lasted three hundred years and "upon which the sun never set" finally lost its hold on the world and slipped into history. But the question of how we understand the British Empire - its origins, nature, purpose, and effect on the world it ruled - is far from settled. In this incisive work, David Cannadine looks at the British Empire from a new perspective - through the eyes of those who created and ruled it - and offers fresh insight into the driving forces behind the Empire. Arguing against the views of Edward Said and others, Cannadine suggests that the British were motivated not only by race, but also by class. The British wanted to domesticate the exotic world of their colonies and to reorder the societies they ruled according to an idealized image of their own class hierarchies.
Abstract:
Ostracism
Comments: Ostracism is among the most powerful means of social influence. From schoolroom time-outs or the "silent treatment" from a family member or friend, to governmental acts of banishment or exile, ostracism is practiced in many contexts, by individuals and groups. This lucidly written book provides a comprehensive examination of this pervasive phenomenon, exploring the short- and long-term consequences for targets as well as the functions served for those who exclude or ignore. Within a cogent theoretical framework, an exemplary research program is presented that makes use of such diverse methods as laboratory experiments, surveys, narrative accounts, interviews, Internet-based research, brief role-plays, and week-long simulations. The resulting data shed new light on how ostracism affects the individual's coping responses, self-esteem, and sense of belonging and control. Informative and timely, this book will be received with interest by researchers, practitioners, and students in a wide range of psychological disciplines.
Abstract:
Outsiders
Comments: This sociological text on deviance and difference provides an exploration into unconventional individuals and their place in "normal" society.
Abstract:
Oxford Handbook of Early Modern Theatre, The
Comments: xxvi, 716 p. : ill., maps, facsim. ; 26 cm.

Includes bibliographical references and index.
Abstract:
Oxford Handbook of Economic Inequality, The
Comments: The Oxford Handbook of Economic Inequality presents a new and challenging analysis of economic inequality, focusing primarily on economic inequality in highly developed countries. Bringing together the world's top scholars this comprehensive and authoritative volume contains an impressive array of original research on topics ranging from gender to happiness, from poverty to top incomes, and from employers to the welfare state. The authors give their view on the state-of-the-art of scientific research in their fields of expertise and add their own stimulating visions on future research. Ideal as an overview of the latest, cutting-edge research on economic inequality, this is a must have reference for students and researchers alike.
Abstract:
Oxford Handbook of Tudor Literature, 1485-1603, The
Comments: xxviii, 832 p. :

Originally published: 2009.; Includes bibliographical references and index.
Abstract:
Patterns of Social Capital
Comments: Societies work best where citizens trust their fellow citizens, work cooperatively for common goals, and thus share a civic culture. The accumulation of reciprocal trust, as demonstrated by voluntary efforts to create common goods, builds social capital and contributes to effective government. This volume advances the study of social capital across chronological and geographical space. It examines voluntary associations, comparatively and cross-culturally, as indicators of citizen readiness for civic engagement. This book is ultimately about the pattern of social and civic interactions in past times, and how these patterns may no longer exist.
Abstract:
Paul Ricoeur
Comments: xii, 155 p. ; 20 cm.

Includes bibliographical references (p. [145]-149) and index.
Abstract:
Perfect Wives, Other Women
Comments: In Perfect Wives, Other Women Georgina Dopico Black examines the role played by women’s bodies—specifically the bodies of wives—in Spain and Spanish America during the Inquisition. In her quest to show how both the body and soul of the married woman became the site of anxious inquiry, Dopico Black mines a variety of Golden Age texts for instances in which the era’s persistent preoccupation with racial, religious, and cultural otherness was reflected in the depiction of women.
Subject to the scrutiny of a remarkable array of gazes—inquisitors, theologians, religious reformers, confessors, poets, playwrights, and, not least among them, husbands—the bodies of perfect and imperfect wives elicited diverse readings. Dopico Black reveals how imperialism, the Inquisition, inflation, and economic decline each contributed to a correspondence between the meanings of these human bodies and “other” bodies, such as those of the Jew, the Moor, the Lutheran, the degenerate, and whoever else departed from a recognized norm. The body of the wife, in other words, became associated with categories separate from anatomy, reflecting the particular hermeneutics employed during the Inquisition regarding the surveillance of otherness.
Dopico Black’s compelling argument will engage students of Spanish and Spanish American history and literature, gender studies, women’s studies, social psychology and cultural studies.
Abstract:
Phenomenology of Perception
Comments:

First published in 1945, Maurice Merleau-Ponty’s monumental Phénoménologie de la perception signalled the arrival of a major new philosophical and intellectual voice in post-war Europe. Breaking with the prevailing picture of existentialism and phenomenology at the time, it has become one of the landmark works of twentieth-century thought. This new translation, the first for over fifty years, makes this classic work of philosophy available to a new generation of readers.

Phenomenology of Perception stands in the great phenomenological tradition of Husserl, Heidegger, and Sartre. Yet Merleau-Ponty’s contribution is decisive, as he brings this tradition and other philosophical predecessors, particularly Descartes and Kant, to confront a neglected dimension of our experience: the lived body and the phenomenal world. Charting a bold course between the reductionism of science on the one hand and "intellectualism" on the other, Merleau-Ponty argues that we should regard the body not as a mere biological or physical unit, but as the body which structures one’s situation and experience within the world.

Merleau-Ponty enriches his classic work with engaging studies of famous cases in the history of psychology and neurology as well as phenomena that continue to draw our attention, such as phantom limb syndrome, synaesthesia, and hallucination. This new translation includes many helpful features such as the reintroduction of Merleau-Ponty’s discursive Table of Contents as subtitles into the body of the text, a comprehensive Translator’s Introduction to its main themes, essential notes explaining key terms of translation, an extensive Index, and an important updating of Merleau-Ponty’s references to now available English translations.

Also included is a new foreword by Taylor Carman and an introduction to Merleau-Ponty by Claude Lefort.

Translated by Donald A. Landes.

Abstract:
Place
Comments: Thoroughly revised and updated, this text introduces students of human geography and allied disciplines to the fundamental concept of place, combining discussion about everyday uses of the term with the complex theoretical debates that have grown up around it.

• A thoroughly revised and updated edition of this highly successful short introduction to place
• Features a new chapter on the use of place in non–geographical arenas, such as in ecological theory, art theory and practice, philosophy, and social theory
• Combines discussion about everyday uses of the term ‘place’ with the more complex theoretical debates that have grown up around it
• Uses familiar stories drawn from the news, popular culture, and everyday life as a way to explain abstract ideas and debates
• Traces the development of the concept from the 1950s through its subsequent appropriation by cultural geographers, and the linking of place to politics
Abstract:
Place of the Dead, The
Comments: This volume of essays provides a comprehensive treatment of a very significant component of the societies of late medieval and early modern Europe: the dead. It argues that to contemporaries the 'placing' of the dead, in physical, spiritual and social terms, was a vitally important exercise, and one which often involved conflict and complex negotiation. The contributions range widely geographically, from Scotland to Transylvania, and address a spectrum of themes: attitudes towards the corpse, patterns of burial, forms of commemoration, the treatment of dead infants, the nature of the afterlife and ghosts. Individually the essays help to illuminate several current historiographical concerns: the significance of the Black Death, the impact of the protestant and catholic Reformations, and interactions between 'elite' and 'popular' culture. Collectively, by exploring the social and cultural meanings of attitudes towards the dead, they provide insight into the way these past societies understood themselves.
Abstract:
Place of the Stage, The
Comments: print

xiii, 178 p. : ill. ; 23 cm.

Steven Mullaney.

Originally published: Chicago : University of Chicago Press, 1988.

Includes bibliographical references (p. 153-171) and index.

Abstract:
Places on the Margin
Comments: The debate on modernity and postmodernity has awakened interest in the importance of the spatial for cultural formations. But what of those spaces that exist as much in the imagination as in physical reality? This book attempts to develop an alternative geography and sociology of space by examining `places on the margin'.
Abstract:
Pluralism
Comments: x, 116 p. ; 22 cm.

Includes bibliographical references (p. [112]-113) and index.
Abstract:
Poetics of Manhood, The
Comments: xviii, 313 p. : ill. ; 24 cm.

Includes bibliography (p. [293]-299) and index.
Abstract:
Poetics of Space, The
Comments: A beloved multidisciplinary treatise comes to Penguin Classics

Rare is the work of philosophy that invites both the casual reader and the academic. Rare, too, is the text so universal that luminaries across an array of fields lay claim to it. Yet, that is precisely the case with Gaston Bachelard’s The Poetics of Space. A rumination on the spaces we inhabit and the dreams and memories that fill them, this seminal work continues to be studied and enjoyed by philosophers, architects, writers, and literary theorists alike.

This new edition features a foreword by Mark Z. Danielewski, whose bestselling novel House of Leaves drew inspiration from Bachelard’s writings, and an introduction by internationally renowned philosopher Richard Kearney who explains the book’s enduring importance and its role within Bachelard’s remarkable career.

Abstract:
Poetry and Politics in the English Renaissance
Comments: print

xix, 327 p. ; 24 cm.

David Norbrook.

Includes bibliographical references and index.

Abstract:
Politics and Poetics of Transgression, The
Comments: xi, 228 p. : ill. ; 23 cm.

Includes index. Bibliography: p. 203-224.
Abstract:
Politics of Commonwealth, The
Comments: print

xiv, 298 p. : ill. ; 24 cm.

Phil Withington.

Includes bibliographical references (p. 269-285) and index.

Abstract:
Politics of Cultural Performance, The
Comments: The line between what is regarded by people as "traditional" and "modern" is constantly being altered by new configurations of power. These essays examine the ways in which such changes are both communicated and created through cultural performances in diverse ethnographic settings. Examples are drawn from a wide range of forms and expressions: divinatory sequences, spirit possession rites, state ceremonials, village feasts, pilgrimages, language-use and craft specialisms. It was Abner Cohen, to whom this volume is dedicated, who first suggested that a dialectical relationship existed between power and symbolism. This concept, as developed in his seminal work, has since become a growing area of study as reflected in this important collection. By questioning some of the directions, the authors make a major interdisciplinary contribution to the study of cultural performance as a key factor in power relationships. The principal stage is Africa, but comparative ethnographic data are drawn from Ireland, Italy, South Asia, and the United Kingdom.

David Parkin is Fellow of All Souls College, Oxford.

Abstract:
Politics of Social Conflict, The
Comments: xvi, 354 p. : ill., maps ; 24 cm.

Includes bibliographical references (p. 326-345) and index.
Abstract:
Politics of Uncertainty, The
Comments: In The Politics of Uncertainty Peter Marris examines one of the most crucial and least studied aspects of social relationships: how we manage uncertainty, from the child's struggle for secure attachment to the competitive strategies of multinational corporations. Using a powerful synthesis of social and psychological theory, he shows how strategies of competition interact with the individual's sense of personal agency to place the heaviest burden of uncertainty on those with the fewest social and economic resources. He argues that these strategies maximize uncertainty for everyone by undermining the reciprocity essential to successful economic and social relationships.
At a time when global economic reorganisation is undermining security of employment, The Politics of Uncertainty makes a convincing case for strategies of co-operation at both personal and political levels to ensure our economic and social survival in the twenty-first century.
Abstract:
Politics of the Excluded, C. 1500-1850, The
Comments: print

ix, 295 p. ; 23 cm.

edited by Tim Harris.

Includes bibliographical references and index.

Abstract:
Politics of the Public Sphere in Early Modern England, The
Comments: This book uses the notion of the "public sphere" to produce a new view of the history of England in the post-reformation period, tracing its themes from the 1530s to the early 18th century. The contributors bring a diverse range of approaches to bear on the central theme. The book puts the results of some of the most innovative and exciting work in the field before the reader in accessible form, and as a result, each chapter can stand on its own and represents a contribution to its own area of study and sub-period as well as to the overall argument of the book. Politics, culture, and religion all feature prominently in the resulting analysis.
Abstract:
Poor Relief in England, 1350-1600
Comments: print

xiii, 352 p. : ill. ; 23 cm.

Marjorie Keniston McIntosh.

Includes bibliographical refernces (p. 312-337) and index.

Abstract: This groundbreaking work traces developments in poor relief from the mid fourteenth century to the Poor Laws of 1598 and 1601.
Popular Culture in Early Modern Europe
Comments: 5.8"x1.2"x8.5"; 424 pages; 1.2 lb

Abstract:
Popular Culture in England, C. 1500-1850
Comments: print

xi, 293 p. : ill. ; 23 cm.

edited by Tim Harris.

Includes bibliographical references (p. 270-282) and index.

Abstract:
Popular Culture in Seventeenth-Century England
Comments: 319 p. ; 23 cm.

Includes bibliographies and index.
Abstract:
Popular Cultures in England, 1550-1750
Comments: ix, 235 p. ; 22 cm.

Includes bibliographical references (p. 224-228) and index.
Abstract:
Population Geography
Comments: The Second Edition of this popular and widely acclaimed undergraduate text has been completely rewritten and extended to incorporate the most modern perspectives. Within population geography, there has been increasing concentration on population dynamics, and this text caters specifically for this exciting emphasis. It concentrates on evolving patterns of fertility, mortality and migration, the spatial and temporal processes that fashion them, and the resultant problems and remedial policies. A major theme is the spatial expression of cause-and-effect links between demographic change and the socioeconomic transformation of societies. A particular strength is the very wide range of case studies drawn from all parts of the developed and less developed world.
Abstract:
Population History and the Family
Comments: print

390 p. : ill., maps ; 24 cm.

edited by Robert I. Rotberg.

Includes bibliographical references.

Abstract:
Population History of England, 1541-1871, The
Comments: print

xv, 779 p., [1] fold. leaf of plates : ill. ; 24 cm.

E.A. Wrigley and R.S. Schofield ; with contributions by Ronald Lee and Jim Oeppen.

Includes index.

Bibliography: p. 741-757.

Abstract:
Population Studies from Parish Registers
Comments: print

xxxiv, 213 p. : ill. ; 22 cm.

edited by Michael Drake.

Abstract:
Population in History
Comments: print

ix, 692 p. illus. 26 cm.

Edited by D.V. Glass and D.E.C. Eversley.

Bibliography: p. 140-143. Bibliographical footnotes.

Abstract:
Postmodern Geographies
Comments: Written by one of America's foremost geographers, Postmodern Geographies contests the tendency, still dominant in most social science, to reduce human geography to a reflective mirror, or, as Marx called it, an "unnecessary complication." Beginning with a powerful critique of historicism and its constraining effects on the geographical imagination, Edward Soja builds on the work of Foucault, Berger, Giddens, Berman, Jameson and, above all, Henri Lefebvre, to argue for a historical and geographical materialism, a radical rethinking of the dialectics of space, time and social being.

Soja charts the respatialization of social theory from the still unfolding encounter between Western Marxism and modern geography, through the current debates on the emergence of a postfordist regime of "flexible accumulation." The postmodern geography of Los Angeles, exposed in a provocative pair of essays, serves as a model in his account of the contemporary struggle for control over the social production of space.
Abstract:
Postmodernism, or, The Cultural Logic of Late Capitalism
Comments: xxii, 438 p., [6]] p. of plates : ill. (some col.) ; 24 cm.

Includes bibliographical references and index.
Abstract:
Poverty and Piety in an English Village
Comments: print

xiv, 241 p. : ill. ; 24 cm.

Keith Wrightson and David Levine.

Originally published: New York : Academic Press, 1979. With a postscript chapter, expanded bibliography, and new index.

Includes bibliographical references (p. [224]-236) and index.

Abstract:
Poverty and Policy in Tudor and Stuart England
Comments: 229p.

Includes index. Bibliography: p.210-218.
Abstract:
Poverty of Historicism, The
Comments: print

166 p. 22 cm.

Abstract:
Power of Feasts, The
Comments: print

ix, 426 pages : illustrations ; 26 cm

Brian Hayden.

Includes bibliographical references (p. 373-422) and index.

Abstract:
Practical Reason
Comments: Do social classes really exist? Is disinterested action really possible? What do the family, the church, and the intellectual world have in common? Can morality be founded on hypocrisy? What is the "subject" of action? In this new volume, one of France's foremost social thinkers of our time responds to these major questions and to others, thus tracing the outlines of a work that could be called "Pierre Bourdieu by himself."

In these texts, the author tries to go to the essential, that is, the most elementary and fundamental, questions. He thereby explains the philosophical principles that have led to his social science research and the idea of the human that guides his choices there. With the lucidity allowed by retrospect, Bourdieu brings out the fundamental theories of his greatest books, notably Outline of a Theory of Practice and The Logic of Practice (Stanford, 1990), and, with an eye to the future, presents the first results of his most recent work on the state, the anthropological moorings of the economy, and male domination.

Bourdieu's theory is both a philosophy of science dedicated to revealing the objective relations that shape and underpin social life, and a philosophy of action that takes account of agents' dispositions as well as the structured situations in which they act. This philosophy of action is condensed in a small number of key concepts—habitus, field, capital—and it is defined by the two-way relationship between the objective structures of social fields and the incorporated structures of the habitus.

All in all, this book should be an indispensable introduction to Bourdieu's work, not only to students and scholars in sociology, anthropology, political science, and philosophy, but throughout the social sciences and humanities generally.

Abstract:
Practice of Everyday Life, The
Comments: xxiv, 229 p. ; 24 cm.

Translation of: Arts de faire. Bibliography: p. 205-229.
Abstract:
Praise and Paradox
Comments: Praise and Paradox explores the relationship of language, literary structure, and social ideology in the popular Elizabethan literature that praised merchants, industrialists and craftsmen. Part I defines a canon of 296 popular vernacular works, relates the increasing popularity of tales about tradesmen to the development of the English economy and the expansion of the Elizabethan audience, and discusses the social origins of the popular authors. Part II is concerned with the change of the merchant's literary image from that of a greedy usurer to that of a 'businessman in armour' who defended his monarch on the battlefield and entertained princes at lavish banquets. Part III discusses the change in the literary image of the craftsman, who ceased to be a clown or a rebel and became a 'gentle craftsman' who fought bravely on the battlefield when necessary but was happier in his humble shop, where he sang, danced, and courted pretty girls.
Abstract:
Pre-Industrial Consumer in England and America, The
Comments: print

p. cm.

Carole Shammas.

Abstract:
Pre-Industrial England
Comments: 245 p. : ill. ; 26 cm.

Bibliography: p. 37-53.
Abstract:
Presentation of Self in Everyday Life, The
Comments:
Abstract:
Price of Inequality, The
Comments: print

lxiv, 523 pages ; 21 cm

Joseph E. Stiglitz.

"First published as a Norton paperback."--Verso of title page.

Originally published in hardcover edition, c2012.

Includes bibliographical references (pages 365-502) and index.

Abstract:
Printing Revolution in Early Modern Europe, The
Comments: print

xix, 384 p. : ill., map ; 24 cm.

Elizabeth L. Eisenstein.

Includes bibliographical references (p. 359-371) and index.

Abstract:
Printing, Writers, and Readers in Renaissance Italy
Comments: xii, 220 p., 18 p. of plates : ill. ; 24 cm.

Includes bibliographical references (p. 186-210) and index. Pt. I. Printing and Book Production. 1. The arrival of printing and its techniques. 2. Publishing, bookselling and the control of books -- Pt. II. Writers and Print Culture. 3. Publication in print: patronage, contracts and privileges. 4. From pen to print: writers and their use of the press -- Pt. III. Readers and Print Culture. 5. Reading, buying and owning printed books. 6. Printing for the reading public: form and content.
Abstract:
Production of Space, The
Comments: 454 p. ; 23 cm.

Translation of: La production de l'espace. "Books by Henri Lefebvre": p. 432-434. Includes bibliographical references and index.
Abstract:
Professions in Early Modern England, 1450-1800, The
Comments: xi, 334 p. ; 24 cm.

Includes bibliographical references and index.
Abstract:
Professions in Early Modern England, The
Comments: 232 p. ; 23 cm.

Includes bibliographies and index.
Abstract:
Property
Comments: ix, 204 p ; 22cm.

Includes bibliography.
Abstract:
Property and Political Theory
Comments: print

198 p. ; 24 cm.

Alan Ryan.

Includes bibliographical references and index.

Abstract:
Property and Politics, 1870-1914
Comments: print

xviii, 445 p. : ill. ; 24 cm.

Avner Offer.

Includes index..

Bibliography: p. 407-428.

Abstract:
Property, Women, and Politics
Comments:
Abstract:
Prosecuting Crime in the Renaissance: England, Germany, France
Comments: ix, 321 p. illus. 25 cm.

Includes bibliographical references.
Abstract:
Prospecting
Comments: ix,316p ; 23cm.

Includes indexes.
Abstract:
Punishment and Modern Society
Comments: 312p. ; 24cm.

Abstract:
Puritanism and Theatre
Comments: print

ix, 300 p. ; 23 cm.

Margot Heinemann.

Includes bibliographical references and index.

Abstract:
Radical Orthodoxy
Comments: print

x, 285 p. ; 24 cm.

edited by John Milbank, Catherine Pickstock, and Graham Ward.

Includes bibliographical references and index.

Abstract:
Radical Tragedy
Comments: viii, 312 p. ; 23 cm.

Includes indexes. Bibliography: p. [290]-305.
Abstract:
Radical Underworld
Comments: print

xvi, 338 p. : ill. ; 24 cm.

Iain McCalman.

Includes index.

Bibliography: p. [293]-325.

Abstract:
Ralph Tailor's Summer
Comments: 6.3"x9.2"x1.2"; 1.2 lb; 224 pages

The plague outbreak of 1636 in Newcastle-upon-Tyne was one of the most devastating in English history. This hugely moving study looks in detail at its impact on the city through the eyes of a man who stayed as others fled: the scrivener Ralph Tailor.As a scrivener Tailor was responsible for many of the wills and inventories of his fellow citizens. By listening to and writing down the final wishes of the dying, the young scrivener often became the principal provider of comfort in people�s last hours. Drawing on the rich records left by Tailor during the course of his work along with many other sources, Keith Wrightson vividly reconstructs life in the early modern city during a time of crisis and envisions what such a calamitous decimation of the population must have meant for personal, familial, and social relations.
Abstract:
Range of Interpretation, The
Comments: print

xv, 206 p. ; 24 cm.

Wolfgang Iser.

A revision and expansion of the Wellek Library lectures given by the author in the spring of 1994.

Includes bibliographical references and index.

Abstract:
Raymond Williams's Sociology of Culture
Comments: xx, 247 p. ; 23 cm.

Includes bibliographical references, p. 219-234, and index.
Abstract:
Reading Material in Early Modern England
Comments: print

xii, 322 p. : ill. ; 24 cm.

Heidi Brayman Hackel.

Includes bibliographical references (p. 282-315) and index.

Abstract:
Reading Revolutions
Comments: print

xiv, 358 p. : ill. ; 25 cm.

Kevin Sharpe.

Includes bibliographical references and index.

Abstract:
Reading Rorty
Comments: xii, 384 p. ; 24 cm.

Includes bibliographical references (p. [371]-378) and index.
Abstract:
Reading the Nation in English Literature
Comments:

This volume contains primary materials and introductory essays on the historical, critical and theoretical study of "national literature", focusing on the years 1550 – 1850 and the impact of ideas of nationhood from this period on contemporary literature and culture.

The book is helpfully divided into three comprehensive parts. Part One contains a selection of primary materials from various English-speaking nations, written between the early modern and the early Victorian eras. These include political essays, poetry, religious writing, and literary theory by major authors and thinkers ranging from Edmund Spenser, Anne Bradstreet and David Hume to Adam Kidd and Peter Du Ponceau. Parts Two and Three contain critical essays by leading scholars in the field: Part Two introduces and contextualizes the primary material and Part Three brings the discussion up-to-date by discussing its impact on contemporary issues such as canon-formation and globalization.

The volume is prefaced by an extensive introduction to and overview of recent studies in nationalism, the history and debates of nationalism through major literary periods and discussion of why the question of nationhood is important.

Reading the Nation in English is a comprehensive resource, offering coherent, accessible readings on the ideologies, discourses and practices of nationhood.

Contributors: Terence N. Bowers, Andrea Cabajsky, Sarah Corse, Andrew Escobedo, Andrew Hadfield, Deborah Madsen, Elizabeth Sauer, Imre Szeman, Julia M. Wright.

Abstract:
Realizing Community
Comments: 'Community' is so overused both in everyday language as well as in scholarly work that it could easily be dismissed as a truism. However, the persistence of the term itself shows that the idea continues to resonate powerfully in our daily lives, ethnographic accounts as well as theoretical analyses. This book returns a timely and concerted anthropological gaze to community as part of a broader consideration of contemporary circumstances of social affiliation and solidarity.
Abstract:
Reassessing Foucault
Comments: x, 226 p. ; 23 cm.

Includes bibliographical references and index.
Abstract:
Reformation and the Towns in England, The
Comments: x, 395 p. ; 22 cm.

Includes bibliographical references and index. Pt. I. Introduction. 1. English Towns in the Age of the Reformation. 2. The Ethos of Community on the Eve of Reformation. 3. Traditional Perspectives and New Approaches -- Pt. II. Material Implications of the Reformation. 4. Dissolution and the Strategies of Acquisition. 5. The Problem of Enabling Authority. 6. Totting Up: Local Resources after the Dissolutions -- Pt. III. Politics and Authority. 7. Introduction. 8. The Drive for Local Autonomy, c. 1540s-1560s. 9. The Triumph of Oligarchy. 10. Oligarchic Rule -- Pt. IV. Political Culture in the Post-Reformation Town. 11. Introduction. 12. Political Culture and the Built Environment. 13. Oligarchic Rule and the Civic Memory. 14. The Culture of Order and Deference -- Table I. Incorporation of English and Welsh Boroughs, 1485-1640 -- Table II. Incorporation and Landholding, 1540-1560 -- Table III. Towns Bringing Particulars for Grants of Dissolved Lands. Table IV. Dissolved Lands Acquired by the City of Gloucester by the Early Seventeenth Century -- Table V. Dissolved Lands Granted for the (Re)Founding of Town Schools -- Table VI. Typical Mayoral Stipends, c. 1540-1640.
Abstract:
Reformation of the Landscape, The
Comments: print

xvi, 637 p. : ill. ; 24 cm.

Alexandra Walsham.

Includes bibliographical references and indexes.

"Bibliography of primary sources": p. [568]-605.

Abstract:
Region, Religion and Patronage
Comments: xiii, 258 p., [4] p. of plates : ill. (some col.), maps, geneal. table ; 25 cm.

Abstract:
Reign of Henry VIII, The
Comments:

For nearly thirty-eight years, Henry VIII ruled the Kingdom of England, and the three children of his six marriages would between them reign for aa further half-century and more. His reign has never ceased to provoke argument, not least because of one of the great titles which he seized for himself: Supreme Head of the Church in England. This claim was to have consequences which are still unravelling today; at the time it led to many deaths and much bitterness. Was Henry as selfish, cruel monster, or a farsighted architect of his country`s future greatness? How were his changes in church and state understood and received by his subjects? Tese are some of the issues discussed by the essayists in the collection.

Abstract:
Reinvention of the World, The
Comments: print

x, 218 p. : maps ; 24 cm.

Douglas Chambers.

Includes bibliographical references and index.

Abstract:
Religion and Society in England
Comments: viii, 267 p. ; 22 cm.

Includes bibliographical references and index.
Abstract:
Remaking English Society
Comments: print

xvii, 374 pages : illustrations ; 24 cm.

edited by Steve Hindle, Alexandra Shepard and John Walter.

Includes bibliographical references and index.

Abstract:
Remapping Early Modern England
Comments: print

xvi, 475 p. : ill. ; 24 cm.

Kevin Sharpe.

Includes bibliographical references and index.

Abstract:
Renaissance Clothing and the Materials of Memory
Comments: During the late sixteenth century 'fashion' first took on the sense of restless change in contrast to the older sense of fashioning or making. As fashionings, clothes were perceived as material forms of personal and social identity which made the man or woman. In Renaissance Clothing and the Materials of Memory Jones and Stallybrass argue that the making and transmission of fabrics and clothing were central to the making of Renaissance culture. Their examination explores the role of clothes as forms of memory transmitted from master to servant, from friend to friend, from lover to lover. This 2001 book offers a close reading of literary texts, paintings, textiles, theatrical documents, and ephemera to reveal how clothing and textiles were crucial to the making and unmaking of concepts of status, gender, sexuality, and religion in the Renaissance. The book is illustrated with a wide range of images from portraits to embroidery.
Abstract:
Renaissance Drama
Comments: viii, 224 p. : ill. ; 23 cm.

Includes bibliographical references (p. [206]-214) and index.
Abstract:
Renaissance Drama
Comments: Renaissance Drama provides a comprehensive and engaging new account of one of the richest periods of theatre history: the drama of early modern England produced for the professional theatre. It brings new insights to bear by exploring the plays in their relation to the culture and society of the period.

Sandra Clark takes the reader through a compelling examination of how plays participate in and respond to changing anxieties, for instance about English nationhood, the monarchy, or the role of the family, sometimes raising difficult questions or offering challenges to accepted views. Unlike many books on Elizabethan drama, the book is organized so as to cover a wide range of plays, some familiar, many less so, by many playwrights, from Lyly in the 1580s to Shirley in the 1640s. Shakespeare is not foregrounded, but neither is he excluded; a chapter considers his dialogue with contemporaries and also the ways in which later playwrights wrote back to his work.

Renaissance Drama will become standard reading for all students and scholars of English literature or the early modern period.
Abstract:
Renaissance Drama
Comments: 180 p. ; 25 cm.

Includes bibliographical references (p. [171]-176) and index.
Abstract:
Renaissance Drama: An Anthology of Plays and Entertainments
Comments: 914 pages

Abstract:
Renaissance Dramatists
Comments: print

ix, 244 p. ; 22 cm.

Kathleen McLuskie.

Includes bibliographical references (p. 231-239)

Abstract:
Renaissance Literature
Comments: xxvii, 282 p. ; 23 cm.

Includes bibliographical references (p. 245-266) and index.
Abstract:
Renaissance Poetry
Comments: ix, 293 p. ; 23 cm.

Includes bibliographical references (p. 274-284) and index.
Abstract:
Renaissance Self-Fashioning
Comments: print

321 p. : ill. ; 24 cm.

Stephen Greenblatt.

Includes bibliographical references and index.

Abstract:
Renaissance and Reformations
Comments: print

vii, 253 p. : ill. ; 24 cm.

Michael Hattaway.

Includes bibliographical references (p. 231-238) and index.

Abstract:
Representing the English Renaissance
Comments: 372p. : ill.

These essays originally appeared in the journal Representations between 1983 and 1986. Includes bibliographies and index.
Abstract:
Reproducing Families
Comments: 251 p.

Includes index.
Abstract:
Resistance Through Rituals
Comments: 287p ill 24cm pbk

Originally published: Birmingham : Centre for Contemporary Cultural Studies, University of Birmingham, 1975
Abstract:
Rethinking Social History
Comments: print

ix, 342 p. : ill. ; 23 cm.

edited by Adrian Wilson.

Includes bibliographical references and index.

Abstract:
Retrieving Women's History
Comments: This volume investigates the role played by women in ancient, more recent and contemporary history and demonstrates that taking into account the activities of women radically alters the perspectives of historians.
Abstract:
Return of Grand Theory in the Human Sciences, The
Comments: viii, 215 p. ; 22 cm.

Based on a series of talks broadcast in 1984 on BBC Radio. Includes index. Bibliography: p. [199]-211.
Abstract:
Revel, Riot, and Rebellion
Comments: xii, 324 p. : ill., map ; 24 cm.

Includes index. Bibliography: p. [300]-313.
Abstract:
Revolutionary Feminism
Comments: Describing the growth of Wollstonecraft's mind and career, this acclaimed study scrutinises all her writings as experiments in revolutionising writing in terms of her revolutionary feminism.
Abstract:
Rewriting the Self
Comments: xii, 283 p. : ill. ; 24 cm.

Based on a seminar series held at the Institute of Contemporary Arts, London, Eng., spring 1995. Includes bibliographical references and index. Representations of the self from Petrarch to Descartes / Peter Burke -- Self and selfhood in the seventeenth century / Jonathan Sawday -- Self-reflection and the self / Roger Smith -- Religious experience and the formation of the early Englightenment self / Jane Shaw -- The European Enlightenment and the history of the self / E.J. Hundert -- The death and rebirth of character in the 18th century / Sylvana Tomaselli -- "Another self in case" : gender, marriage, and the individual in Augustan literature / Carolyn D. Williams -- Feelings and novels / John Mullan -- Romantic travel / Roger Cardinal -- " --As a rule, I does not mean I" : personal identity and the Victorian woman poet / Kate Flint -- Mapping the self : gender, space, and modernity in mid-Victorian London / Lynn Nead -- Stories of the eye / Daniel Pick -- The modern auditory I / Steven Connor -- Assembling the modern self / Nikolas Rose -- Death and the self / Jonathan Dollimore -- Self-undoing subjects / Terry Eagleton.
Abstract:
Rhetoric
Comments: 198 p. ; 20 cm.

Includes bibliographical references (p. [186]-193) and index.
Abstract:
Rhetorics of Display
Comments: Rhetorics of Display is a pathbreaking volume that brings together a distinguished group of scholars to assess an increasingly pervasive form of rhetorical activity. Editor Lawrence J. Prelli notes in his introduction that twenty-first century citizens continually confront displays of information and images, from the verbal images of speeches and literature to visual images of film and photography to exhibits in museums to the arrangement of our homes to the merchandising of consumer goods. The volume provides an integrated, comprehensive study of the processes of selecting what to reveal and what to conceal that together constitute the rhetorics of display. Surveying major historical transformations in the relationship between rhetoric and display, this book also identifies the leading themes in relevant scholarship of the past three decades. Seventeen case studies canvass a representative and diverse range of displays--from body piercing to a civil rights memorial to a Titanic exhibition to imagery found in gambling casinos--and examine the ways that phenomena, persons, places, events, identities, communities, and cultures are exhibited before audiences. Collectively the contributors shed light on rhetorics that are nearly ubiquitous in contemporary communication and culture.
Abstract:
Riot, Rebellion and Popular Politics in Early Modern England
Comments: Riot, Rebellion and Popular Politics in Early Modern England reassesses the relationship between politics, social change and popular culture in the period c. 1520-1730. It argues that early modern politics needs to be understood in broad terms, to include not only states and elites, but also disputes over the control of resources and the distribution of power. Andy Wood assesses the history of riot and rebellion in the early modern period, concentrating upon: popular involvement in religious change and political conflict, especially the Reformation and the English Revolution; relations between ruler and ruled; seditious speech; popular politics and the early modern state; custom, the law and popular politics; the impact of literacy and print; and the role of ritual, gender and local identity in popular politics.
Abstract:
Rise and Decline of the State, The
Comments: viii, 439 p. ; 24 cm.

Includes bibliographical references and index. Before the state: prehistory to AD 1300 -- The rise of the state: 1300 to 1648 -- The state as an instrument: 1648 to 1789 -- The state as an ideal: 1789 to 1945 -- The spread of the state: 1696 to 1975 -- The decline of the state: 1975-.
Abstract:
Rise and Fall of Freedom of Contract, The
Comments: print

xi, 792 p. ; 24 cm.

by P.S. Atiyah.

Corrected ed.

Includes bibliographical references and index.

Abstract:
Rise and Fall of Merry England, The
Comments: xi, 366 p. ; 24 cm.

Includes bibliographical references.
Abstract:
Rise of Cities in North-West Europe, The
Comments: print

xi, 174 p. : maps ; 24 cm.

Adriaan Verhulst.

Includes bibliographical references (p. 157-170) and indexes.

Abstract:
Rise of Historical Sociology, The
Comments: x, 231 p. : ill. ; 23 cm.

Includes index. Bibliography: p. [193]-220.
Abstract:
Rise of the English Town, 1650-1850, The
Comments: 112 p. : ill. ; 22cm.

Abstract:
Ritual in Early Modern Europe
Comments: This new and expanded edition of the first comprehensive study of rituals in early modern Europe examines the impact on the European interpretation of ritual from the discoveries of new civilizations in the Americas and missionary efforts in China. It also adds more material about rituals peculiar to women. Edward Muir draws on extensive historical research to emphasize the persistence of traditional Christian ritual practices, even as enlightened elites attempted to choose reason over passion, textual interpretation over ritual action, and moral rectitude over gaining access to supernatural powers of anti-Christian rituals. First Edition Hb (1997) 0-521-40169-0 First Edition Pb (1997) 0-521-40967-5
Abstract:
Ritualised Friendship and the Greek City
Comments: In this book, Gabriel Herman offers a new interpretation of Greek xenia, a term traditionally rendered as 'guest-friendship'. Drawing on contemporary literary sources and inscriptions as well as anthropology, sociology, and comparative evidence from other times, he shows that xenia was a bond of fictitious kinship akin to godparenthood, rather than a tie of hospitality or ordinary 'friendship'. Starting off from this proposition, he develops a dynamic model of the formation of elite relationships and values. He explores the concepts of obligation and loyalty, gift and bribe, treason and patriotism, and places the Greek city within a new context of power relations. This book, which assumes no knowledge of Greek, will be of interest to students and teachers of ancient history and classics. It will also appeal to social and political scientists.
Abstract:
Road to Divorce
Comments: print

xxvii, 460 p., [32] p. of plates : ill. ; 25 cm.

by Lawrence Stone.

Abstract:
Rule of Moderation, The
Comments: print

xiii, 381 p. : ill. ; 24 cm.

Ethan H. Shagan.

Includes bibliographical references and index.

Abstract: "This book began as an attempt to answer a deceptively simple question: why was it that whenever the Tudor-Stuart regime most loudly trumpeted its moderation, that regime was at its most vicious? The question had first occurred to me in the context of Henry VIII's remarkable, simultaneous execution of three Catholics and three Protestants in July 1540 as a (literally) flamboyant statement of the Church of England's moderation. But over years of teaching English history, I found that the question seemed to recur in a wide variety of contexts: the claim to punish religious dissidents for their conduct but not to make windows into men's souls; the use of writs of the peace to enforce order and punish offenders without resorting to the courts; claims for the moderation of the English empire compared to the excesses of New Spain; laws promoting religious toleration that established new penalties for blasphemy. The common thread running through these examples was that they were all cases where power was authorised and even amplified by its limitation. My deceptively simple question, I realised, led deep into the ideological heart of early modern England. My first answer to this question was that moderation was an intrinsically relational and comparative ethical framework, so that every claim to the moderate centre involved the construction and vilification of extremists on the margins"--
Rum Punch & Revolution
Comments: print

265 p. : ill. ; 24 cm.

Peter Thompson.

Includes bibliographical references (p. [249]-256) and index.

Abstract:
Second-Hand Cultures
Comments: 6.4"x9.4"x0.8"; 1.1 lb; 288 pages

Second-hand shops: simply sources of undesirable "cast-offs" or Aladdin's caves where hidden treasures await discovery? The popular perception, of course, is that second-hand stores are crammed with junk. Yet the rise and demand of vintage goods shows that second-hand shopping is as much about style as it is bargain-hunting. What happens when consumers with very different motives get together to browse and buy, either as a survival strategy or a style statement? What does second-hand buying and selling tell us about contemporary culture? How do items that begin life as new get recycled and reclaimed? What things do we part with and why? How does second-hand shopping differ from buying new? Answering these questions and many more, Second-Hand Cultures presents six years of research into the bric-a-brac and knick-knacks people love to collect. Following the life stories of goods as they travel into and through second-hand sites, the authors look at the work and lives of buyers and sellers. In doing so they reveal the allure of the "previously owned."
Abstract:
Self After Postmodernity, The
Comments: xiv, 155 p. : ill. ; 22 cm.

Includes bibliographical references and index.
Abstract:
Self Consciousness
Comments: xi, 217 p. ; 23 cm.

Includes bibliographical references (p. [197]-209) and index.
Abstract:
Sense of the People, The
Comments: print

xiv, 460 p. : ill. ; 22 cm.

Kathleen Wilson.

Originally published: 1995.

Based on the author's thesis (Ph. D.)--Yale University.

Includes bibliographical references and index.

Abstract:
Senses in Performance, The
Comments: xi, 216 p. : ill., 25 cm.

Includes bibliographical references and index.
Abstract:
Senses of Place
Comments: The articles collected here consider the construction of place in both a physical and conceptual sense. They discuss how places are created by, and help to create, the people who live in them.
Abstract:
Serfdom and Slavery
Comments: print

vi, 358 p. ; 23 cm.

edited by M.L. Bush.

Includes bibliographical references and index.

Abstract:
Servants in Husbandry in Early Modern England
Comments: xii, 233 p. : ill. ; 24 cm.

Includes index. Bibliography: p. 205-229.
Abstract:
Seventeenth-Century British Poetry, 1603-1660
Comments: xxii, 999 p. ; 24 cm.

Includes bibliographical references (p. 971-979) and index.
Abstract:
Seventeenth-Century Kent
Comments: print

xv, 294 p. illus.,maps. 23cm.

[by] C. W. Chalklin.

Bibliographical footnotes.

Abstract:
Shakespeare and Language
Comments: This collection of essays considers the characteristics, excitement and unique qualities of Shakespeare's language, the relationship between language and event, and the social, theatrical and literary function of language. A new introduction, by Jonathan Hope, explicates the differences between Shakespeare's language and our own, provides a theoretical and contextual framework for the pieces that follow, and makes transparent an aspect of Shakespeare's craft (and the critical response to it)that has frequently been opaque.
Abstract:
Shakespeare and Material Culture
Comments: 5.3"x8.0"x0.7"; 0.6 lb; 208 pages

What is the significance of Shylock's ring in The Merchant of Venice? How does Shakespeare create Gertrude's closet in Hamlet? How and why does Ariel prepare a banquet in The Tempest? In order to answer these and other questions, Shakespeare and Material Culture explores performance from the perspective of the material conditions of staging. In a period just starting to be touched by the allure of consumer culture, in which objects were central to the way gender and social status were experienced but also the subject of a palpable moral outrage, this book argues that material culture has a particularly complex and resonant role to play in Shakespeare's employment of his audience's imagination.Chapters address how props and costumes work within the drama's dense webs of language - how objects are invested with importance and how their worth is constructed through the narratives which surround them. They analyse how Shakespeare constructs rooms on the stage from the interrelation of props, the description of interior spaces and the dynamics between characters, and investigate the different kinds of early modern practices which could be staged - how the materiality of celebration, for instance, brings into play notions of hospitality and reciprocity. Shakespeare and Material Culture ends with a discussion of the way characters create unique languages by talking about things - languages of faerie, of madness, or of comedy - bringing into play objects and spaces which cannot be staged. Exploring things both seen and unseen, this book shows how the sheer variety of material cultures which Shakespeare brings onto the stage can shed fresh light on the relationship between the dynamics of drama and its reception and comprehension.
Abstract:
Shakespeare and the Question of Culture
Comments: The last two decades have witnessed a profound change in the way we receive the literary texts of early modern England. One could call this a move from 'text' to 'culture'. Put briefly, earlier critics tended to focus on literary texts, strictly conceived: plays, poems, prose fictions, essays. Since the mid 1980s, however, it has been just as likely for critics to speak of the 'culture' of early modern England, even when they do so in conjunction with analysis of literary texts. This 'cultural turn' has clearly enriched the way in which we read the texts of early modern England, but the interdisciplinary practices involved have frequently led critics to make claims about materials and about the 'culture' these materials appear to embody that exceed those materials' representativeness.
Abstract:
Shakespeare's Sexual Language: A Glossary
Comments: 6.1"x9.1"x0.9"; 1.3 lb; 352 pages

Shakespeare's use of sexual language, imagery and erotic themes is extensive, varied, and although this is necessarily hard to establish, probably innovative at times. This glossary provides a first-hand guide to Shakespeare's sexual language, some of which is notoriously difficult to unravel and whose roots go back into earlier literature. Compiled by Gordon Williams, author of the authoritative three volume "Dictionary of Sexual Language", "Imagery in Shakespearean" and "Stuart Literature", this is a comprehensive but concise reference guide to sexual language and imagery in Shakespeare. Entries are cross-referenced and include references to textual examples where possible.
Abstract:
Shakespearean Stage Space, The
Comments: How did Renaissance theatre create its powerful effects with so few resources? In The Shakespearean Stage Space, Mariko Ichikawa explores the original staging of plays by Shakespeare and his contemporaries to build a new picture of the artistry of the Renaissance stage. Dealing with problematic scenes and stage directions, Ichikawa closely examines the playing conditions in early modern playhouses to reveal the ways in which the structure of the stage was used to ensure the audibility of offstage sounds, to control the visibility of characters, to convey fictional locales, to create specific moods and atmospheres and to maintain a frequently shifting balance between fictional and theatrical realities. She argues that basic theatrical terms were used in a much broader and more flexible way than we usually assume and demonstrates that, rather than imposing limitations, the bare stage of the Shakespearean theatre offered dramatists and actors a variety of imaginative possibilities.
Abstract:
Shakespearean Wild, The
Comments: "A significant view of women in Shakespeare against a large background of the Wild. The learning brought to bear on the topic is not only sound but fascinating."-Maurice Charney, author of Comedy High and Low.
Abstract:
Shame of Poverty, The
Comments: The Shame of Poverty invites the reader to question their understanding of poverty by bringing into close relief the day-to-day experiences of low-income families living in societies as diverse as Norway and Uganda, Britain and India, China, South Korea, and Pakistan.

The volume explores Nobel laureate Amartya Sen's contention that shame lies at the core of poverty. Drawing on original research and literature from many disciplines, it reveals that the pain of poverty extends beyond material hardship. Rather than being shameless, as is often claimed by the media, people in poverty almost invariably feel ashamed at being unable to fulfil their personal aspirations or to live up to societal expectations due to their lack of income and other resources. Such shame not only hurts, adding to the negative experience of poverty, but undermines confidence and individual agency, can lead to depression and even suicide, and may well contribute to the perpetuation of poverty.

Moreover, people in poverty are repeatedly exposed to shaming by the attitudes and behaviour of the people they meet, by the tenor of public debate that either dismisses them or labels them as lazy and in their dealings with public agencies. Public policies would be demonstrably more successful if, instead of stigmatising people for being poor, they treated them with respect and sought actively to promote their dignity.

This book, together with the companion volume Poverty and Shame: Global Experiences, presents comparable evidence from the seven countries, challenges the conventional thinking that separates discussion of poverty found in the Global North from that prevalent in the Global South. It demonstrates that the emotional experience of poverty, with its attendant social and psychological costs, is surprisingly similar despite marked differences in material well-being and varied cultural traditions and political systems. In so doing, the volumes provide a foundation for a more satisfactory global conversation about the phenomenon of poverty than that which has hitherto been frustrated by disagreement about whether poverty is best conceptualised in absolute or relative terms.

The volume draws on the ground-breaking research of an international team: Grace Bantebya-Kyomuhendo, Elaine Chase, Sohail Choudhry, Erika Gubrium, Ivar Lodemel, JO Yongmie (Nicola), Leemamol Mathew, Amon Mwiine, Sony Pellissery and YAN Ming.
Abstract:
Shaping History
Comments: print

remote

xiii, 221 p. ; 24 cm.

Wayne te Brake.

A digital reproduction is available from E-Editions, a collaboration of the University of California Press and the California Digital Library's eScholarship program.

Includes bibliographical references (p. 189-213) and index.

Abstract:
Shaping the Day
Comments: print

xiv, 456 p. : ill., maps, plans ; 25 cm.

Paul Glennie and Nigel Thrift.

Includes bibliographical references (p. [419]-449) and index.

Abstract:
Shelf Life
Comments: Supermarkets, in all their everyday mundanity, embody something of the enormous complexity of living and consuming in late twentieth century western societies. Shelf Life, first published in 1998, explores the supermarket as a retail space and as an arena of everyday consumption in Australia. It historically situates and critically discusses the everyday food products we buy, the retail environments in which we do so, the attitudes of the retailers who construct such environments, and the diverse ways in which all of us undertake and think about supermarket shopping. Yet this book is more than narrative history. It engages with broader issues of the nature of Australian modernity, the globalisation of retail forms, the connection between consumption and self-autonomy, and the highly gendered nature of retailing and shopping. It interrogates also the work of cultural critics, and questions recent attempts to grasp what it means to consume and to be a 'consumer'.
Abstract:
Shopping in the Renaissance
Comments: print

ix, 403 p. : ill. (some col.) ; 26 cm.

[Evelyn Welch].

Includes bibliographical references (p. 364-393) and index.

Abstract:
Shopping, Place, and Identity
Comments: print

xi, 214 p. : ill. ; 24 cm.

Daniel Miller ... [et al.].

Includes bibliographical references (p. 198-206) and index.

Abstract:
Silent but for the Word
Comments: print

304 p. : ill. ; 24 cm.

edited by Margaret Patterson Hannay.

Includes index.

Bibliography: p. [293]-295.

Abstract:
Singlewomen in the European Past, 1250-1800
Comments:

When we think about the European past, we tend to imagine villages, towns, and cities populated by conventional families—married couples and their children. Although most people did marry and pass many of their adult years in the company of a spouse, this vision of a preindustrial Europe shaped by heterosexual marriage deceptively hides the well-established fact that, in some times and places, as many as twenty-five percent of women and men remained single throughout their lives.

Despite the significant number of never-married lay women in medieval and early modern Europe, the study of their role and position in that society has been largely neglected. Singlewomen in the European Past opens up this group for further investigation. It is not only the first book to highlight the important minority of women who never married but also the first to address the critical matter of differences among women from the perspective of marital status.

Essays by leading scholars—among them Maryanne Kowaleski, Margaret Hunt, Ruth Mazo Karras, Susan Mosher Stuard, Roberta Krueger, and Merry Wiesner—deal with topics including the sexual and emotional relationships of singlewomen, the economic issues and employment opportunities facing them, the differences between the lives of widows and singlewomen, the conflation of singlewomen and prostitutes, and the problem of female slavery. The chapters both illustrate the roles open to the singlewoman in the thirteenth through eighteenth centuries and raise new perspectives about the experiences of singlewomen in earlier times.

Abstract:
Sixteenth Century, The
Comments:

Abstract:
Slavery
Comments: viii, 174 p., [2] p. of plates : maps ; 24 cm.

Includes bibliographical references (p. [165]-168) and index.
Abstract:
Sleepless Souls
Comments: Sleepless Souls is a social and cultural history of suicide in early modern England. It traces the rise and fall of the crime of self-murder and explores the reasons why suicide came to be harshly punished in the sixteenth century, and why it was gradually decriminalized in the century and a half following the English Revolution. Michael MacDonald and Terence R. Murphy employ a wide range of records from the period between 1500 and 1800 in order to place suicide in its contemporary context, and relate its history to political events, religious changes, philosophical fashions, tensions between central government and local communities, class interests, and the communication media. The authors treat the crisis of death by suicide as a lens in which the forces that reshaped the mental outlook of different classes and social groups are reflected.
Abstract:
Social Body, The
Comments: 170 p. : ill. ; 24 cm.

Includes bibliographical references and index.
Abstract:
Social Divisions
Comments: Society consists of sharply divided people with different lives and distinct identities. Written by leading sociologists, the new edition covers a range of social inequalities, with new chapters on work, social identity and global social divisions. It continues to be an invaluable, up-to-date introduction for social science students.

Abstract:
Social Life of Money in the English Past, The
Comments: In an age when authoritative definitions of currency were in flux and small change was scarce, money enjoyed a rich and complex social life. Deborah Valenze shows how money became involved in relations between people in ways that moved beyond what we understand as its purely economic functions. This highly original investigation covers the formative period of commercial and financial development in England between 1630 and 1800. In a series of interwoven essays, Valenze examines religious prohibitions related to avarice, early theories of political economy and exchange practices of the Atlantic economy. In applying monetary measurements to women, servants, colonial migrants, and local vagrants, this era was distinctive in its willingness to blur boundaries between people and things. Lucid and highly readable, the book revises the way we see the advance of commercial society at the threshold of modern capitalism.
Deborah Valenze is Professor of History at Barnard College, Columbia University, in New York City. She is the author of The First Industrial Woman, Prophetic Sons and Daughters: Female Preaching and Popular Religion in Industrial England, and numerous scholarly articles.
Abstract:
Social Life of Things, The
Comments: print

xiv, 329 p. ; 24 cm.

edited by Arjun Appadurai.

Three of the papers were presented to the Ethnohistory Workshop at the University of Pennsylvania during 1983-84; the others were presented at a Symposium on the Relationship between Commodities and Culture, held May 23-25, 1984, in Philadelphia.

Includes bibliographies and index.

Abstract:
Social Meaning of Money, The
Comments: xi, 286 p. ; 25 cm.

Includes index. Includes bibliographical references.
Abstract:
Social Memory
Comments:
Abstract:
Social Mindscapes
Comments:

Why do we eat sardines, but never goldfish; ducks, but never parrots? Why does adding cheese make a hamburger a "cheeseburger" whereas adding ketchup does not make it a "ketchupburger"? By the same token, how do we determine which things said at a meeting should be included in the minutes and which ought to be considered "off the record" and officially disregarded?

In this wide-ranging and provocative book, Eviatar Zerubavel argues that cognitive science cannot answer these questions, since it addresses cognition on only two levels: the individual and the universal. To fill the gap between the Romantic vision of the solitary thinker whose thoughts are the product of unique experience, and the cognitive-psychological view, which revolves around the search for the universal foundations of human cognition, Zerubavel charts an expansive social realm of mind--a domain that focuses on the conventional, normative aspects of the way we think.

With witty anecdote and revealing analogy, Zerubavel illuminates the social foundation of mental actions such as perceiving, attending, classifying, remembering, assigning meaning, and reckoning the time. What takes place inside our heads, he reminds us, is deeply affected by our social environments, which are typically groups that are larger than the individual yet considerably smaller than the human race. Thus, we develop a nonuniversal software for thinking as Americans or Chinese, lawyers or teachers, Catholics or Jews, Baby Boomers or Gen-Xers. Zerubavel explores the fascinating ways in which thought communities carve up and classify reality, assign meanings, and perceive things, "defamiliarizing" in the process many taken-for-granted assumptions.

Abstract:
Social Network Analysis
Comments: x, 208 p. : ill. ; 23 cm.

Includes bibliographical references (p. [193]-204) and index.
Abstract:
Social Orders and Social Classes in Europe Since 1500
Comments: This pioneering survey evaluates the notions of class and order throughout European history since 1500. After a general theoretical section on the concept of orders and class, the book provides discussions and case studies of the nobility, the clergy, the middle classes and the rural and urban proletariat. The studies are drawn from all over Europe, from early modern Castile to late Tsarist Russia. Contributors include Peter Burke, Stuart Woolf, A A Thompson and Joseph Bergin.
Abstract:
Social Relations of Jonson's Theater, The
Comments: The author considers the Elizabethan playwright Ben Jonson a realist and an acute observer of the transformation from feudalism to capitalism with many of the forms and purposes of Jonson's realism resulting from the social dynamics of the London theater audience. Haynes presents a detailed literary historical argument about the sources and consequences of Jonson's realism and examines the entanglements of life and art in Jonson's time both through a look at the life of that period and through insightful readings of Jonson's plays. The book is informed by the new social history and polemicizes against the moral and formal preoccupations of the past two generations of Jonson criticism.
Abstract:
Social Theory
Comments: Social theory is the theoretical core of the social sciences, clearly distinguishable from political theory and cultural analysis. This book offers a unique overview of the development of social theory from the end of the Second World War in 1945 to the present day. Spanning the literature in English, French and German, it provides an excellent background to the most important social theorists and theories in contemporary sociological thought, with crisp summaries of the main books, arguments and controversies. It also deals with newly emerging schools from rational choice to symbolic interactionism, with new ambitious approaches (Habermas, Luhmann, Giddens, Bourdieu), structuralism and antistructuralism, critical revisions of modernization theory, feminism and neopragmatism. Written by two of the world's leading sociologists and based on their extensive academic teaching, this unrivalled work is ideal both for students in the social sciences and humanities and for anyone interested in contemporary theoretical debates.
Abstract:
Social Theory Today
Comments: Social theory has undergone dramatic changes over the past fifteen years. The aim of this book is to provide a comprehensive survey of those changes, and an authoritative statement on current trends of development in social thought. The contents of the book range in a systematic way across the major traditions of social theory prominent today. Among the topics covered are the relationships between modern social theory and the 'classics' of the late eighteenth and nineteenth centuries; the connections between social theory and mathematical social science; and the logical status of generalizations in the social sciences. Traditions of thought discussed include: behaviourism; symbolic interactionism; Parsonian theory; analytical theory; structuralism and post-structuralism; ethnomethodology; structuration theory; world systems theory; Marxism and critical theory.
Abstract:
Social Theory and Social Change
Comments: x, 260 p. ; 23 cm.

Includes bibliographical references (p. 245-254) and index.
Abstract:
Social Theory in the Twentieth Century and Beyond
Comments: This revised edition of Patrick Baert's widely acclaimed "Social Theory in the Twentieth Century," now benefitting from the collaboration of Filipe Carreira da Silva has been brought right up-to-date with cutting-edge developments in social theory today. It offers an easy-to-read but provocative account of the development of social theory, covering a range of key figures and classic schools of thought. The authors bridge the gap between philosophy and social theory, locating the theoretical views of individuals such as Michel Foucault, Anthony Giddens and J?rgen Habermas within wider historical traditions.

The revised edition includes new material on actor-network theory, French pragmatist sociology and cultural sociology, and discusses contemporary social thinker such as Zygmunt Bauman, Ulrich Beck, Manuel Castells, Randall Collins, Michael Mann, Saskia Sassen and Theda Skocpol. The authors conclude with a bold, new pragmatist agenda for social theory and the social sciences.

Written in a lively style, and avoiding jargon, "Social Theory in the Twentieth Century and Beyond" is aimed at students who wish to gain an understanding of the main debates and dilemmas driving social theory. Like its predecessor, it will be a standard introduction to modern social theory for students in sociology, politics and anthropology.

Abstract:
Societies, Cultures, and Kinship, 1580-1850
Comments: xv, 221 p. : ill., maps, geneal. tables ; 24 cm.

Includes bibliographical references and index.
Abstract:
Society and Culture in Early Modern France
Comments: xviii, 362 p., [4] leaves of plates : ill. ; 22 cm.

Includes bibliographical references and index.
Abstract:
Society in Early Modern England
Comments: The sixteenth and seventeenth centuries have traditionally been regarded by historians as a period of intense and formative historical change, so much so that they have often been described as ‘early modern′ – an epoch separate from ‘the medieval′ and ‘the modern′. Paying particular attention to England, this book reflects on the implications of this categorization for contemporary debates about the nature of modernity and society. The book traces the forgotten history of the phrase ′early modern′ to its coinage as a category of historical analysis by the Victorians and considers when and why words like ′modern′ and ′society′ were first introduced into English in the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries. In so doing it unpicks the connections between linguistic and social change and how the consequences of those processes still resonate today. A major contribution to our understanding of European history before 1700 and its resonance for social thought today, the book will interest anybody concerned with the historical antecedents of contemporary culture and the interconnections between the past and the present.
Abstract:
Society in Time and Space
Comments: print

xii, 230 p. : ill. ; 24 cm.

Robert A. Dodgshon.

Includes bibliographical references (p. 202-222) and index.

Abstract:
Society, Politics, and Culture
Comments: vii, 485 p. : map ; 23 cm.

Includes bibliographical references and index.
Abstract:
Sociological Theory
Comments:
Abstract:
Sociology of Death, The
Comments:
Abstract:
Sociology of Norbert Elias, The
Comments: x, 289 p. ; 24 cm.

Includes bibliographical references and index.
Abstract:
Soul of the Age
Comments: print

xix, 471 p. : ill., maps ; 24 cm.

Jonathan Bate.

Includes bibliographical references (p. [427]-455) and index.

Abstract: Bate's Soul of the Age tells the story of the great dramatist while deducing the crucial events of Shakespeare's life, connecting those events to his world and work as never before, and revealing how this unsurpassed artist came to be.
Sources of the Self
Comments: print

xii, 601 p. ; 25 cm.

Charles Taylor.

Includes index.

Bibliography: p. 523-593.

Abstract:
Spatial Economy, The
Comments: 367p.

Abstract:
State Formation in Early Modern England, C. 1550-1700
Comments: ix, 448 p ; 24 cm.

Includes bibliographical references and index.
Abstract:
State and Social Change in Early Modern England, C.1550-1640, The
Comments: This is a study of the social and cultural implications of the growth of governance in England in the century after 1550. It is principally concerned with the role played by the middling sort in social and political regulation, especially through the use of the law. It discusses the evolution of public policy in the context of contemporary understandings, of economic change; and analyses litigation, arbitration, social welfare, criminal justice, moral regulation and parochial analyses administration as manifestations of the increasing role of the state in early modern England.
Abstract:
State, Sovereigns & Society in Early Modern England
Comments:
Abstract:
States, Nations, and Nationalism
Comments: print

xiii, 376 p. ; 24 cm.

Hagen Schulze ; translated from the German by William E. Yuill.

Includes bibliographical references [p. 339-350] and index.

Abstract:
Stealing People's Names
Comments: xiii, 221 p., [1] leaf of plates : ill., maps ; 24 cm.

Bibliography: p. 205-213.
Abstract:
Stereotyping
Comments: xvii, 246 p. : ill. ; 23 cm.

Includes bibliographical references and index.
Abstract:
Structural Models in Anthropology
Comments: xiv, 201 p. : ill. ; 24 cm.

Includes index. Bibliography: p. 183-194.
Abstract:
Structuration
Comments: * How is structuration central to the social sciences?
* What are the implications of conceptualizing the relation between structure and agency as one of duality or dualism?
* Why was structuration theory invented and what can replace it?

Structuration provides an introduction to this central debate in social theory and helps to explain the historical processes producing the structures that shape human social life. Few would dispute that social reality is produced by creative human agents operating in pre-existing structural contexts, but social theorists are divided over how structure and agency are related. John Parker contrasts the views of Bourdieu and Giddens, who uphold duality (identity), with those of the post-structurationists, Archer and Mouzelis, who defend dualism (non-identity). The context and logic of the duality arguments are examined, but it is suggested that Giddens' structuration theory is outdated, and the emphasis is placed on making accessible the positive suggestions of the post-structurationist dualists in relation to actual historical cases. The debate about structuration has important consequences for the way we explain the production and transformation of social structures such as institutions and rules, cultural traditions, patterns of regular behaviour, and distributions of power and inequality. Students and researchers across the social sciences will find this to be a clear and accessible guide to a concept at the heart of social theory.
Abstract:
Stuart Constitution, 1603-1688, The
Comments: print

xvi, 523 p. 24 cm.

Edited and introduced by J.P. Kenyon.

Bibliography: p. 511-516.

Abstract:
Studying Society
Comments: vii, 168 p. ; 22 cm.

Abstract:
Subculture
Comments: First Published in 2002. Routledge is an imprint of Taylor & Francis, an informa company.
Abstract:
Suicide in Victorian and Edwardian England
Comments: xiii, 475 p. : ill., maps ; 23 cm.

Includes index. Bibliography: p. [431]-459.
Abstract:
Surveillance, Power, and Modernity
Comments: ix, 243 p. ; 24 cm.

Includes bibliographical references (p. 228-237) and index.
Abstract:
Surveying the People
Comments:
Abstract:
Symbolic Construction of Community, The
Comments: Anthony Cohen makes a distinct break with earlier approaches to the study of community, which treated the subject in largely structural terms. His view is interpretive and experiential, seeing the community as a cultural field with a complex of symbols whose meanings vary among its members. He delineates a concept applicable to local and ethnic communities through which people see themselves as belonging to society. The emphasis on boundary is sensitive to the circumstances in which people become aware of the implications of belonging to a community, and describes how they symbolise and utilise these boundaries to give substance to their values and identities.
Abstract:
Symbolic Economies
Comments: print

257 p. ; 24 cm.

Jean-Joseph Goux ; translated by Jennifer Curtiss Gage.

"This volume contains selections from Jean-Joseph Goux, Freud, Marx: Economie et symbolique and Les iconoclastes, Editions du Seuil, 1973 and 1978"--T.p. verso.

Includes bibliographical references and index.

Abstract:
System of Objects, The
Comments: Pressing Freudian and Saussurean categories into the service of a basically Marxist perspective, The System of Objects offers a cultural critique of the commodity in consumer society. Baudrillard classifies the everyday objects of the 'new technical order' as functional, nonfunctional and metafunctional. He contrasts 'modern' and 'traditional' functional objects, subjecting home furnishing and interior design to a celebrated semiological analysis. His treatment of nonfunctional or 'marginal' objects focuses on antiques and the psychology of collecting, while the metafunctional category extends to the useless, the aberrant and even the 'schizofunctional'. Finally, Baudrillard deals at length with the implications of credit and advertising for the commodification of everyday life.
Abstract:
Taverns and Drinking in Early America
Comments: print

xi, 309 p. : ill., maps ; 24 cm.

Sharon V. Salinger.

Includes bibliographical references and index.

Abstract:
Texts and Cultural Change in Early Modern England
Comments: print

x, 254 p. : ill. ; 23 cm.

edited by Cedric C. Brown and Arthur F. Marotti.

Includes bibliographical references and index.

Abstract:
Theatre Audiences
Comments: print

xi, 248 p. ; 22 cm.

Susan Bennett.

Includes bibliographical references (p. 223-240) and index.

Abstract:
Theatre, Finance and Society in Early Modern England
Comments: xii, 199 p. ; 24 cm.

Includes bibliographical references and index.
Abstract:
Theft of History, The
Comments: In The Theft of History Jack Goody builds on his own previous work to extend further his highly influential critique of what he sees as the pervasive Eurocentric or occidentalist biases of so much western historical writing and the consequent 'theft' by the West of the achievements of other cultures in the invention of (notably) democracy, capitalism, individualism and love. Goody, one of the world's most distinguished anthropologists, raises questions about theorists, historians and methodology and proposes a new comparative approach to cross-cultural analysis which allows for more scope in examining history than an East versus West style.
Abstract:
Theories of Social Remembering
Comments: Through a synthesis of old and new theories of social remembering, this book provides the first comprehensive overview of the sociology of memory. This rapidly expanding field explores how representations of the past are generated, maintained and reproduced through texts, images, sites, rituals and experiences.
Abstract:
Theorizing Patriarchy
Comments: Sylvia Walby provides an overview of recent theoretical debates - Marxism, radical and liberal feminism, post-structuralism and dual systems theory. She shows how each can be applied to a range of substantive topics from paid work, housework and the state, to culture, sexuality and violence, relying on the most up-to-date empirical findings. Arguing that patriarchy has been vigorously adaptable to the changes in women's position, and that some of women's hard-won social gains have been transformed into new traps, Walby proposes a combination of class analysis with radical feminist theory to explain gender relations in terms of both patriarchal and capitalist structure.
Abstract:
Theory and the Premodern Text
Comments: print

xvi, 269 p. ; 24 cm.

Paul Strohm.

Includes bibliographical references (p. 215-257) and index.

Abstract:
Theory of Culture
Comments: With the increasing focus on the concept of culture by sociologists and other social scientists, there is now a need for clarifying and developing theoretical perspectives on this issue. The contributors to this volume have answered this call, each adding new insight to the debate over culture, its definition, and its relationship with other basic categories in sociological theory. Along the way they touch on other fundamental issues, such as the interrelationship of culture with society, the human personality, and the wider environment of the human condition.
Abstract:
Theory of Economic Development, The
Comments:

Includes bibliographical references.
Abstract:
Think on My Words
Comments: print

xii, 254 p. : ill. ; 22 cm.

David Crystal.

Includes bibliographical references (p. 247-248) and index.

Abstract:
Thinking Through Cultures
Comments:

A discipline is emerging called cultural psychology; it will serve as a force of renewal for both anthropology and psychology. In this book Richard Shweder presents its manifesto. Its central theme is that we have to understand the way persons, cultures, and natures make each other up. Its goal is to seek the mind indissociably embedded in the meanings and resonances that are both its product and its components.

Over the past thirty years the person as a category has disappeared from ethnography. Shweder aims to reverse this trend, focusing on the search for meaning and the creation of intentional worlds. He examines the prospect for a reconciliation of rationality and relativism and defines an intellectual agenda for cultural psychology.

What Shweder calls for is an exploration of the human mind, and of one's own mind, by thinking through the ideas and practices of other peoples and their cultures. He examines evidence of cross-cultural similarities and differences in mind, self, emotion, and morality with special reference to the cultural psychology of a traditional Hindu temple town in India, where he has done considerable work in comparative anthropology. And he critiques the concept of the "person" implicit in Western social science, as well as psychiatric theories of the "subject." He maintains that it will come as no surprise to cultural psychology if it should turn out that there are different psychological generalizations or "nomological networks"--a Hindu psychology, a Protestant psychology--appropriate for the different semiotic regions of the world. Shweder brings the news that God is alive not dead, but that there are many gods.

Abstract:
Thomas Middleton
Comments: 2016 p. : ill., maps ; 26 cm.

Includes index.
Abstract:
Time and the Shape of History
Comments: This ambitious book explores the relationship between time and history and shows how an appreciation of long-term time helps to make sense of the past. For the historian, time is not an unproblematic given but, as for the physicist or the philosopher, a means to understanding the changing patterns of life on earth. The book is devoted to a wide-ranging analysis of the way different societies have conceived and interpreted time, and it develops a theory of threefold roles of continuity, gradual change, and revolution that together form a 'braided' history. Linking the interpretative chapters are intriguing brief expositions on time travel, time cycles, time lines and time pieces, showing readers the different ways in which human history has been located in time. In its global approach the book is part of the new shift towards 'big history', in which traditional period divisions are challenged in favour of looking again at the entire past of the world from start to end. The approach is thematic. The result is a view of world history in which outcomes are shown to be explicable, once they happen, but not necessarily predictable before they do. This book will inform the work of historians of all periods and at all levels, and contributes to the current reconsideration of traditional period divisions (such as Modernity and Postmodernity), which the author finds outmoded.
Abstract:
Time, Family, and Community
Comments: print

ix, 302 p. : ill., maps ; 24 cm.

edited by Michael Drake.

Includes bibliographical references (p. [291]-295) and index.

Abstract:
Torn Halves
Comments: print

244 p. ; 22 cm.

Robert J.C. Young.

Includes bibliographical references (p. [223]-236) and index.

Abstract:
Townspeople and Nation
Comments: xi, 251 p. : ill., map ; 23 cm.

Includes bibliographical references (p. [205]-241) and index.
Abstract:
Transformation of English Provincial Towns, 1600-1800, The
Comments: 359 p., [8] p. of plates : ill. ; 22 cm.

Includes bibliographies and index.
Abstract:
Transforming Talk
Comments:
Abstract:
Transforming Work
Comments: print

ix, 256 pages ; 23 cm.

Katherine C. Little.

Includes bibliographical references (pages 237-248) and index.

Abstract:
Transversal Enterprises in the Drama of Shakespeare and His Contemporaries
Comments: print

xi, 271 p. ; 23 cm.

Bryan Reynolds.

Includes index.

Includes bibliographical references and index.

Abstract:
Trickster Makes This World
Comments: x, 417 p. : ill. ; 24 cm.

Includes bibliographical references (p. [389]-400) and index.
Abstract:
Tropics of Discourse
Comments: x, 287 p. ; 24 cm.

Includes bibliographical references and index.
Abstract:
Trust Is the Coin of the Realm
Comments: print

x, 354 p. : ill., maps ; 25 cm.

Edwina A. Thompson.

Includes bibliographical references (p. [298]-328) and index.

Abstract:
Trust in Modern Societies
Comments: print

vi, 296 p. ; 23 cm.

Barbara A. Misztal.

Includes bibliographical references (p. [270]-287) and index.

Abstract:
Tudor Economic Documents
Comments: print

3 v.

edited by R. H. Tawney and Eileen Power.

Abstract:
Tudor Economic Problems
Comments: 192 pages

Abstract:
Tudor and Stuart Lincoln
Comments: This book is the sequel to Medieval Lincoln. The author, Dr Hill, had an intimate knowledge of the city (of which he was a former mayor) and made a lifelong study of the records and sources which form the basis of his survey. An introductory chapter gives a description of the isolated Lincolnshire countryside during the period. The remainder of the book is on, a broadly chronological plan, recording the religious, political, economic and social affairs of the city, the lives of its peoples under the Tudors and Stuarts and its fortunes during the Civil War. There are appendices dealing with some particular aspects of the period, four maps and a number of fine illustrations.
Abstract:
Tudor and Stuart Town, The
Comments:
Abstract:
Understanding Agency
Comments: In this penetrating and assured book, one of the leading commentators in the field argues that social theory is moving in the wrong direction in its reflections on human freedom and autonomy. It has borrowed notions of 'agency' and 'choice' from everyday discourse, but increasingly it puts a misconceived individualistic gloss upon them. Against this, Barnes unequivocally identifies human beings as social agents in a profound sense, and emphasises the vital importance of their sociability. Notions of 'agency', 'freedom' and 'choice' have to be understood by reference to their role in communicative interaction; they are key components of the discourse through which human beings identify each other, and have effects upon each other, as soci
Abstract:
Understanding Foucault
Comments: Derided and disregarded by many of his contemporaries, Michel Foucault is now regarded as probably the most influential thinker of the twentieth century--his work is studied across the humanities and social sciences, among other disciplines. Readin
Abstract:
Understanding Popular Culture
Comments: xi, 206 p. : ill. ; 22 cm.

Includes index. Bibliography: p. [195]-200.
Abstract:
Understanding Quantitative History
Comments: xxv, 366 p. : ill. ; 24 cm.

"Published as part of an Alfred P. Sloan Foundation program"--P. facing t.p. Includes bibliographical references and index.
Abstract:
Understanding the Law of Obligations
Comments: 224 pages

Abstract:
Unravelling Gramsci
Comments: 'Powerful and clarifying ... The book's combination of careful argument and cogent illustration will make this a landmark volume in Gramscian studies.' John Agnew, University of California, Los Angeles, and author of Hegemony: The New Shape of Global Power 'Morton draws upon an impressive knowledge of Gramsci's writings to provide new insights into key processes in today's world order.' Anne Showstack Sassoon, Emeritus Professor, Kingston University and Visiting Professor, Birkbeck College, University of London Unravelling Gramsci makes extensive use of Antonio Gramsci's writings, including his much-overlooked pre-prison journalism, prison letters, as well as his prison notebooks, to provide a fresh approach to understanding his contemporary relevance in the current neoliberal world order. Adam Morton examines in detail the themes of hegemony, passive revolution and uneven development to provide a useful way of analysing the contemporary global political economy, the project of neoliberalism, processes of state formation, and practices of resistance. The book explores the theoretical and practical limitations of how Gramsci's ideas can be used today, offering a broad insight into state formation and the international factors shaping hegemony within a capitalist framework.
Abstract:
Unsettled
Comments:

Migrants made up a growing class of workers in late sixteenth- and seventeenth- century England. In fact, by 1650, half of England’s rural population consisted of homeless and itinerant laborers. Unsettled is an ambitious attempt to reconstruct the everyday lives of these dispossessed people. Patricia Fumerton offers an expansive portrait of unsettledness in early modern England that includes the homeless and housed alike.

            Fumerton begins by building on recent studies of vagrancy, poverty, and servants, placing all in the light of a new domestic economy of mobility. She then looks at representations of the vagrant in a variety of pamphlets and literature of the period. Since seamen were a particularly large and prominent class of mobile wage-laborers in the seventeenth century, Fumerton turns to seamen generally and to an individual poor seaman as a case study of the unsettled subject: Edward Barlow (b. 1642) provides a rare opportunity to see how the laboring poor fashioned themselves, for he authored a journal of over 225,000 words and 147 pages of drawings. Barlow’s journal, studied extensively here for the first time, vividly charts what he himself termed his “unsettled mind” and the perpetual anxieties of England’s working and wayfaring poor. Ultimately, Fumerton explores representations of seamen as unsettled in the broadside ballads of Barlow’s time.

Abstract:
Untying the Knot
Comments: print

xvi, 261 p. : ill. ; 21 cm.

Roderick Phillips.

Includes bibliographical references and index.

Abstract:
Urbane and Rustic England
Comments: print

xiv, 317 p. ; 25 cm.

Carl B. Estabrook.

Includes bibliographical references (p. 281-305) and index.

Abstract:
Using Computers in History
Comments: xiii, 248 p. : ill. ; 25 cm.

Title from e-book title screen (viewed October 15, 2007) Includes bibliographical references (p. 240-244) and index. Access restricted to University of Saskatchewan students, faculty and staff. Electronic reproduction.UK :MyiLibrary,2007Available via World Wide Web.Access may be limited to MIL affiliated libraries.
Abstract:
Utopia, Carnival, and Commonwealth in Renaissance England
Comments: vi, 382 p. : ill. ; 24 cm.

Includes bibliographical references (p. [333]-370) and index.
Abstract:
Varieties of Cultural History
Comments: print

x, 246 p. ; 23 cm.

Peter Burke.

Includes bibliographical references (p. [213]-240) and index.

Abstract:
Verdict According to Conscience
Comments: xx, 409 p. ; 24 cm.

Includes bibliographical references and indexes.
Abstract:
Vernacular Literature and Current Affairs in the Early Sixteenth Century
Comments: print

xxv, 211 p. : ill. ; 24 cm.

edited by Jennifer Britnell and Richard Britnell.

Includes bibliographical references (p. [184]-200) and index.

Abstract:
Village Bells
Comments:
Abstract:
Violence and Civilization
Comments: This book provides an introduction to the work of Norbert Elias. It is the first systematic appraisal of two central themes of his thought - violence and civilization. Although Elias is best known for his theory of civilizing processes, this study highlights the crucial importance of the concept of decivilizing processes. Fletcher argues that while Elias did not develop a theory of decivilizing processes, such a theory is logically implied in his perspective and is highly pertinent to an understanding of the most violent episodes of twentieth-century history, such as the Nazi genocides.

Elias's original synthesis of sociology and psychology is examined through an analysis of several key texts including "The Civilizing Process, The Established and the Outsiders" and "The Germans." Fletcher shows how Elias constructs his "figurational models" and applies these comparatively to specific historical examples drawn from England and Germany.

"Violence and Civilization" is an excellent introduction to Elias's work. It will appeal to students of sociology, anthropology, and history interested in understanding the phenomenon of violence in the modern world.

Abstract:
Violence and Social Orders
Comments: All societies must deal with the possibility of violence, and they do so in different ways. This book integrates the problem of violence into a larger social science and historical framework, showing how economic and political behavior are closely linked. Most societies, which we call natural states, limit violence by political manipulation of the economy to create privileged interests. These privileges limit the use of violence by powerful individuals, but doing so hinders both economic and political development. In contrast, modern societies create open access to economic and political organizations, fostering political and economic competition. The book provides a framework for understanding the two types of social orders, why open access societies are both politically and economically more developed, and how some 25 countries have made the transition between the two types.
Abstract:
Vision and Method in Historical Sociology
Comments: Some of the most important questions of the social sciences in the twentieth century have been posed by scholars working at the intersections of social theory and history viewed on a grand scale. The core essays of this book focus on the careers and contributions of nine of these scholars: Marc Bloch, Karl Polanyi, S. N. Eisenstadt, Reinhard Bendix, Perry Anderson, E. P. Thompson, Charles Tilly, Immanuel Wallerstein, and Barrington Moore, Jr. The essays convey a vivid sense of the vision and values each of these major scholars brings (or bought) to his work and analyze and evaluate the research designs and methods each used in his most important works. The introduction and conclusion discuss the long-running tradition of historically grounded research in sociology, while the conclusion also provides a detailed discussion and comparison of three recurrent strategies for bringing historical evidence and theoretical ideas to bear upon one another. informative, thought-provoking, and unusually practical, the book offers fascinating and relevant reading to sociologists, social historians, historically oriented political economists, and anthropologists - and, indeed, to anyone who wants to learn more about the ideas and methods of some of the best-known scholars in the modern social sciences.
Abstract:
Volatile Bodies : Towards a Corporeal Feminism
Comments: Book on feminist theory.
Abstract:
Walter Benjamin
Comments: Drawing upon a wealth of journal writings and personal correspondence, Esther Leslie presents a uniquely intimate portrait of one of the intellectual giants of the twentieth century, Walter Benjamin. She sets his life in the context of his middle-class upbringing; explores the social, political, and economic upheaval in Germany during and after World War I; and recounts Benjamin’s eccentric love of toys, trick-books, travel, and ships. From the Frankfurt School and his influential friendships with Theodore Adorno, Gershom Scholem, and Bertolt Brecht, to his travels across Europe, Walter Benjamin traces out the roots of Benjamin’s groundbreaking writings and their far-reaching impact in his own time. Leslie argues that Benjamin’s life challenges the stereotypical narrative of the tragic and lonely intellectual figure—instead positioning him as a man who relished the fierce combat of competing theories and ideas.
Closing with his death at the Spanish-French border in a desperate flight from the Nazis and Stalin, Walter Benjamin is a concise and concentrated account of a capacious intellect trapped by hostile circumstances.
Abstract:
War, Politics and Finance in Late Medieval English Towns
Comments: x, 264 p. : col. ill ; 24 cm.

Formerly CIP. Bibliography: p. 235-251. - Includes index.
Abstract:
Wealth and Society in Early Sixteenth Century England
Comments: xiv, 333 p. ; 23 cm.

Includes bibliography and index.
Abstract:
Wealth of Five Northamptonshire Families, 1540-1640, The
Comments: print

xix, 246 p. ports., geneal. tables, tables. 25 cm.

With a pref. by H. J. Habakkuk.

Without thesis note.

Thesis--Cambridge.

Bibliography: p. [204]-213.

Abstract:
Western Sexuality
Comments: 220p.

Abstract:
Wet Nursing
Comments: xx, 300 p. : ill. ; 24 cm.

Includes index. Bibliography: p. 281-290.
Abstract:
What Is Cultural History?
Comments: vi, 152 p. ; 23 cm.

Includes bibliographical references and index.
Abstract:
What Is Masculinity?: Historical Dynamics from Antiquity to the Contemporary World
Comments: 6.4"x9.3"x1.3"; 1.9 lb; 464 pages

Across history, the ideas and practices of male identity have varied much between time and place: masculinity proves to be a slippery concept, not available to all men, sometimes even applied to women. This book analyses the dynamics of "masculinity" as both an ideology and lived experience -- how men have tried, and failed, to be "Real Men."
Abstract:
When Death Do Us Part
Comments: The 17 essays contained in this volume provide insight into the probate records of early modern England, focusing on three principal sources: wills, inventories, and accounts. With an emphasis on method, approach, and interpretation—demonstrated through both general discussions and a range of case studies—this reference is ideal for a wide audience, including academics and students as well as local and family historians enagaged in the investigation of communities in England.
Abstract:
When Gossips Meet
Comments: print

vi, 398 p. ; 22 cm.

Bernard Capp.

Includes bibliographical references (p. [383]-385) and index.

Abstract:
Why Feminism?
Comments:

Three decades after the remarkable resurgence of feminism, gender issues have become ubiquitous in public debate. For some, feminism is the favorite scapegoat for multiple social ills; for others, the greatest success story of the closing century. The Janus face of feminism in the media reflects the competing images of women's lives today. Feminists themselves hold sharply opposing views on the success or failures of three decades of women's activism. Why Feminism? looks at the shifts in feminist thinking from the brash emergence of Women's Liberation at the close of the 1960s to the diverse and discordant feminisms of recent decades. Exploring feminism's troubled relations with psychology and psychoanalysis, the rise of new evolutionary theory, the impact of queer theorizing on gender categories, controversies over memory and trauma, and increasing anxieties about men and masculinity, Why Feminism? illustrates the continuing provocation and significance of feminist inquiry, laying out potentialities and pitfalls for the century ahead.

Abstract:
Why Things Matter to People
Comments: Andrew Sayer undertakes a fundamental critique of social science's difficulties in acknowledging that people's relation to the world is one of concern. As sentient beings, capable of flourishing and suffering, and particularly vulnerable to how others treat us, our view of the world is substantially evaluative. Yet modernist ways of thinking encourage the common but extraordinary belief that values are beyond reason, and merely subjective or matters of convention, with little or nothing to do with the kind of beings people are, the quality of their social relations, their material circumstances or well-being. The author shows how social theory and philosophy need to change to reflect the complexity of everyday ethical concerns and the importance people attach to dignity. He argues for a robustly critical social science that explains and evaluates social life from the standpoint of human flourishing.
Abstract:
Widening Gate, The
Comments: print

remote

xxvii, 464 p. : ill. ; 24 cm.

David Harris Sacks.

"A Centennial book."

A digital reproduction is available from E-Editions, a collaboration of the University of California Press and the California Digital Library's eScholarship program.

Includes bibliographical references (p. 365-451) and index.

Abstract:
Widowhood in Medieval and Early Modern Europe
Comments: This new collection of essays brings together brand new research on widowhood in medieval and early modern Europe. The volume opens with an introductory chapter by the Editors which looks generally at the conditions and constructions of widowhood in this period. This is followed by a range of essays which illuminate different dimensions of widowhood across Europe - in England, Italy, France, Germany and Spain. A particular attraction of the volume is the attention given to widowers, and the comparisons made between the male and female experience of widowhood. It is an exciting reinterpretation of the subject which will do much to undo the traditional stereotype of the widow.

Contributing to the volume are: Jodi Bilinkoff, Giulia Calvi, Sandra Cavallo, Isabelle Chabot, Julia Crick, Amy Erikson, Dagmar Freist, Elizabeth Foyster, Margaret Pelling, Pamela Sharpe,Tim Stretton, Barbara Todd, and Lyndan Warner.
Abstract:
Wilhelm Dilthey
Comments: viii, 197 p. ; 23 cm.

Includes indexes. Bibliography: p. 181-183.
Abstract:
Wiltshire Woollen Industry in the Sixteenth and Seventeenth Centuries, The
Comments: print

4 p. l., 140, [1] p. illus. (map) 23 cm.

by G. D. Ramsay.

"A note on sources": p. 147-149. Bibliographical foot-notes.

Abstract:
Women Players in England, 1500-1660 Beyond the All-Male Stage
Comments:

Abstract:
Women Traders in Cross-Cultural Perspective
Comments: print

xiii, 308 p. : ill. ; 24 cm.

Linda J. Seligmann, editor.

Includes bibliographical references (p. 271-297) and index.

Abstract:
Women and Property in Early Modern England
Comments: This ground-breaking book reveals the economic reality of ordinary women between the late 16th and early 18th centuries. Drawing on little-known sources, Amy Louise Erickson reconstructs day-to-day lives, showing how women owned, managed and inherited property on a scale previously unrecognised. Her complex and fascinating research, which contrasts the written laws with the actual practice, completely revises the traditional picture of women's economic status in pre-industrial England. Women and Property is essential reading for anyone interested in women, law and the past.
Abstract:
Women and Religion in England
Comments: Patricia Crawford explores how the study of gender can enhance our understanding of religious history, in this study of women and their apprehensions of God in early modern England. The book has three broad themes: the role of women in the religious upheaval in the period from the Reformation to the Restoration; the significance of religion to contemporary women, focusing on the range of practices and beliefs; and the role of gender in the period. The author argues that religion in the early modern period cannot be understood without a perception of the gendered nature of its beliefs, institutions and language. Contemporary religious ideology reinforced women's inferior position, but, as the author shows, it was possible for some women to transcend these beliefs and profoundly influence history.
Abstract:
Women in Early Modern England, 1500-1800
Comments: print

42 p. ; 30 cm.

Patricia Crawford, Helen Brash, and Claire Walker.

Abstract:
Women in English Society, 1500-1800
Comments: Provides a systematic analysis of various aspects of women's lives between 1500 and 1800, concentrating on detailed research into specific groups of women where it has been possible to build up a picture in some detail.
Abstract:
Women, Class, and the Feminist Imagination
Comments: Author note:Karen V. Hansenis a doctoral candidate in the Department of Sociology at the University of California, Berkeley.Ilene J. Philipsonis on the faculty of the Psychology Graduate Program at the New College of California, San Francisco.
Abstract:
Women, Crime And The Courts In Early Modern England
Comments: A study of women's criminal activity and how the English legal system and society perceived them between 1560 and 1750.
Abstract:
Women, Work, and Family
Comments: print

xiii, 233 p. ; 24 cm.

Angela Hattery.

Includes bibliographical references (p. 213-217) and index.

Abstract:
Wool Trade in Tudor and Stuart England, The
Comments: print

xviii, 242 p. maps. 23 cm.

by Peter J. Bowden.

"Distributed in the United States by International Scholarly Book Services, inc., Beaverton, Oregon."

Reprint of the 1962 ed.

Bibliography: p. [221]-228.

Abstract:
Work in Towns, 850-1850
Comments: print

xi, 250 p. : ill., maps ; 24 cm.

edited by Penelope J. Corfield and Derek Keene.

Papers from a conference held in London, July 9-11, 1987.

Includes bibliographical references (p. [231]-241) and index.

Abstract:
Working Life of Women in the Seventeenth Century
Comments: print

lix, 328 p. ; 22 cm.

Alice Clark.

Includes bibliographical references (p. [xliii]-lv) and index.

Abstract:
Working Women in English Society, 1300-1620
Comments: This study explores the diverse and changing ways in which English women participated in the market economy between 1300 and 1620. Marjorie Keniston McIntosh assesses women's activity by examining their engagement in the production and sale of goods, service work, credit relationships, and leasing of property. Using substantial new evidence from equity court petitions and microhistorical studies of five market centres, she challenges both traditional views of a 'golden age' for women's work and more recent critiques. She argues that the level of women's participation in the market economy fluctuated considerably during this period under the pressure of demographic, economic, social, and cultural change. Although women always faced gender-based handicaps, some of them enjoyed wider opportunities during the generations following the plague of 1348–9. By the late sixteenth century, however, these opportunities had largely disappeared and their work was concentrated at the bottom of the economic system.
Abstract:
Works of Richard Edwards, The
Comments: print

xiv, 269 p. : ill. ; 23 cm.

[edited by] Ros King.

Includes bibliographical references (p. [259]-260) and index.

Abstract:
World We Have Gained, The
Comments: print

x, 421 p. : ill. ; 24 cm.

edited by Lloyd Bonfield, Richard M. Smith, and Keith Wrightson.

Essays presented to Peter Laslett on his seventieth birthday.

Includes bibliographical references and index.

Abstract:
World We Have Lost, The
Comments: print

xiv, 325 p. facsims. (on lining papers). 23 cm.

Bibliography: p. [312]-317.

Abstract:
World of Christopher Marlowe, The
Comments: David Riggs evokes the atmosphere and texture of Marlowe's life, from the stench and poverty of a childhood spent near Canterbury's abattoirs to the fanatical pursuit of classical learning at school. Marlowe won a place at Cambridge University, where he entered its world of 18-hour working days, religious intrigue and twilight homosexuality, tolerated but unspoken. The gifted student was not immune to the passions and fears of the wider society, and Riggs describes the mood of England in those years when Elizabeth's crown was anything but secure, and Spain and the Papacy were determined to overthrow her regime. Looming above everything is the Elizabethan state and its spy rings, with which Marlowe was already involved by the time he left Cambridge. His undercover missions brought him into contact with Catholic conspirators who were plotting to kill the Queen; yet as a playwright and thinker he was attracted to the most unorthodox and threatening idea of all - atheism. Marlowe's brief life was enigmatic, contradictory and glorious - and this magisterial work of reconstruction and scholarship illuminates it with immense richness.
Abstract:
Worlds Apart
Comments: xvi, 262 p. ; 24 cm.

Includes index. Bibliography: p. 204-256.
Abstract:
Worlds Apart: Modernity Through the Prism of the Local
Comments: Worlds Apart is concerned with one of the new futures of anthropology, namely the advances in technologies which r eate an imagination of new global and local forms. It also analyses studies of the consumption of these forms and attempts to go beyond the assumptions that consumption either localises or fails to effect global forms and images.
Several of the chapters are written by anthropologists who have specialised in material culture studies and who examine the new forms, especially television and mass commodities, as well as some new uses of older forms, such as the body. The book also considers the ways in which people are increasingly not the primary creators of these images but have become secondary consumers.
Abstract:
Worlds Within Worlds
Comments: print

xv, 449 p. : ill. ; 24 cm.

Steve Rappaport.

Includes index.

Bibliography: p. 408-429.

Abstract:
Writing Under Tyranny
Comments: print

x, 556 p. ; 25 cm.

Greg Walker.

Includes bibliographical references and index.

Abstract:
Writing Women's History
Comments:

Anne Firor Scott's "The Southern Lady: From Pedestal to Politics, 1830-1930" stirred a keen interest among historians in both the approach and message of her book. Using women's diaries, letters, and other personal documents, Scott brought to life southern women as wives and mothers, as members of their communities and churches, and as sometimes sassy but rarely passive agents. She brilliantly demonstrated that the familiar dichotomies of the personal versus the public, the private versus the civic, which had dominated traditional scholarship about men, could not be made to fit women's lives. In doing so, she helped to open up vast terrains of women's experiences for historical scholarship.

This volume, based on papers presented at the University of Mississippi's annual Chancellor Porter L. Fortune Symposium in Southern History, brings together essays by scholars at the forefront of contemporary scholarship on American women's history. Each regards "The Southern Lady" as having shaped her historical perspective and inspired her choice of topics in important ways. These essays together demonstrate that the power of imagination and scholarly courage manifested in Scott's and other early American women historians' work has blossomed into a gracious plentitude.

Abstract:
Writing and Difference
Comments: print

xx, 342 p. ; 24 cm.

Jacques Derrida ; translated, with an introd. and additional notes by Alan Bass.

Translation of L'écriture et la différence.

Includes bibliographical references.

Abstract:
Writing of History, The
Comments:

A leading intellectual member of France's Freudian school, Michel de Certeau combined principles from the disciplines of religion, history, and psychoanalysis in order to redefine historiography and rethink the categories of history. In The Writing of History, de Certeau examines the West's changing conceptions of the very role and nature of history itself, from the seventeenth-century attempts to formulate a "history of man" to Freud's Moses and Monotheism with which de Certeau interprets historical practice as a function of mankind's feelings of loss, mourning, and absence. Exhaustively researched and stunningly innovative, The Writing of History is a crucial introduction to de Certeau's work and is destined to become a classic of modern thought.

Abstract:
Writing the English Republic
Comments: print

xiii, 509 p. : ill. ; 24 cm.

David Norbrook.

Includes bibliographical references and index.

Abstract:
Writing the Nation in Reformation England, 1530-1580
Comments: print

vi, 291 p. ; 23 cm.

Cathy Shrank.

Includes bibliographical references (p. [258]-280) and index.

Abstract:
Youth and Authority
Comments: print

viii, 459 p. ; 24 cm.

Paul Griffiths.

Includes bibliographical references (p. 403-435) and index.

Abstract: